Religion of Peace in action


spaminator
#571
'American Taliban' John Walker Lindh to be released
Associated Press
Published:
May 22, 2019
Updated:
May 22, 2019 7:03 PM EDT
John Walker Lindh is seen in these two file photos.Alexandria Sheriff's Office via AP / AP Photo, File
ALEXANDRIA, Va. — John Walker Lindh, the young Californian who became known as the American Taliban after he was captured by U.S. forces in the invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, is set to go free after nearly two decades in prison.
But conditions imposed recently on Lindh’s release, slated for Thursday, make clear that authorities remain concerned about the threat he could pose once free.
Lindh, now 38, converted to Islam as a teenager after seeing the film Malcolm X and went overseas to study Arabic and the Qur’an. In November 2000, he went to Pakistan and from there made his way to Afghanistan. He joined the Taliban and was with them on Sept. 11, 2001, when al-Qaida terrorists attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
The U.S. attacked Afghanistan after the country failed to turn over al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden. Lindh was captured in a battle with Northern Alliance fighters in late 2001. He was present when a group of Taliban prisoners launched an attack that killed Johnny Micheal “Mike” Spann, a CIA officer who had been interrogating Lindh and other Taliban prisoners.
Television footage of a bearded, wounded Lindh captured among Taliban fighters created an international sensation, and he was brought to the U.S. to face charges of conspiring to kill Spann and providing support to terrorists. Eventually, he struck a plea bargain in which he admitted illegally providing support to the Taliban but denied a role in Spann’s death.
This file image taken Dec. 1, 2001, from television footage in Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan, shows John Walker Lindh, right, claiming to be an American Taliban volunteer. AP Video, File
Lindh received a 20-year prison sentence. He served roughly 17 years and five months, including two months when he was in military detention. Federal inmates who exhibit good behaviour typically serve 85% of their sentence.
His probation officer asked the court to impose additional restrictions on Lindh while he remains on supervised release for the next three years. Lindh initially opposed but eventually acquiesced to the restrictions, which include monitoring software on his internet devices; requiring that his online communications be conducted in English and that he undergo mental health counselling; and forbidding him from possessing or viewing extremist material, holding a passport of any kind or leaving the U.S.
Authorities never specified their rationale for seeking such restrictions. A hearing on the issue was cancelled after Lindh agreed to them.
The Bureau of Prisons said Lindh rejected an interview request submitted by The Associated Press, and his lawyer declined to comment. But there have been reports that Lindh’s behaviour in prison has created cause for concern. Foreign Policy magazine reported in 2017 that an investigation by the National Counterterrorism Center found that Lindh “continued to advocate for global jihad and to write and translate violent extremist texts.”
A former inmate who knew Lindh from the time they spent at the same federal prison said he never heard Lindh espouse support for al-Qaida or indicate a risk for violence, but he found Lindh to be anti-social and awkward around others, with an unyielding, black-and-white view of religion. The inmate spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because he wanted to avoid further stigmatization from his time in Lindh’s prison unit.
Michael Jensen, a terrorism researcher at the University of Maryland’s National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism, said it’s clear the government has concerns about Lindh’s mindset.
“For three years he’s going to be watched like a hawk,” Jensen said.
He said Lindh represents an interesting test case, as he is on the leading edge of dozens of inmates who were convicted on terror-related offences in the aftermath of Sept. 11 and are eligible for release in the next five years. He said there’s little research to indicate the efficacy of de-radicalizing inmates with connections to radical Islam, but he said the research shows that recidivism rates for those connected to white supremacy and other forms of extremism are high.
Lindh has been housed in Terre Haute, Indiana, with other Muslim inmates convicted on terror-related charges. The rationale was to keep those inmates from radicalizing others in the general prison population, Jensen said. Those inside the unit were supposed to be limited in their ability to communicate with each other.
“But the reality is these guys still talk to each other,” he said.
Lindh, for his part, admitted his role and his wrongdoing in supporting the Taliban, but he and his family have bristled at any notion that he should be considered a terrorist. When he was sentenced, Lindh said he never would have joined the Taliban if he fully understood what they were about. He also issued a short essay condemning acts of violence in the name of Islam that kill or harm innocent civilians.
Lindh’s time in prison has provided only a few clues about his current outlook. He filed multiple lawsuits, which were largely successful, challenging prison rules he found discriminatory against Muslims. In the more recent lawsuits, he used the name Yahya Lindh. One lawsuit won the right to pray in groups at the prison in Terre Haute. A second lawsuit reversed a policy requiring strip searches for inmates receiving visitors, and a third won the right to wear prison pants above the ankle, which Lindh said is in accordance with Islamic principles.
In the strip-search lawsuit, Lindh offered a discussion of Islamic rules prohibiting exposure of the body. If he’s compelled to reveal himself, he said, he’s also compelled under his religion to fight the rules requiring him to sin.
Some have criticized Lindh’s pending release. In March, the legislature in Alabama, where Spann grew up, adopted a resolution calling it “an insult” to Spann’s “heroic legacy and his remaining family members.”
In addition, Republican Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby and Democratic New Hampshire Sen. Maggie Hassan wrote a letter last week to the Bureau of Prisons expressing concern.
“We must consider the security and safety implications for our citizens and communities who will receive individuals like John Walker Lindh who continue to openly call for extremist violence,” they wrote.
On Monday, Spann’s father, Johnny Spann, wrote a letter requesting that Lindh be investigated before he’s released, citing the National Counterterrorism Center’s investigation as his rationale for concern.
http://torontosun.com/news/world/ame...to-be-released
 
spaminator
#572
'American Taliban' John Walker Lindh freed after 17 years in prison
Associated Press
Published:
May 23, 2019
Updated:
May 23, 2019 5:10 PM EDT
In this file image taken from video broadcast Dec. 19, 2001.CNN via AP, File
John Walker Lindh, the Californian who took up arms for the Taliban and was captured by U.S. forces in Afghanistan in 2001, got out of prison Thursday after more than 17 years, released under tight restrictions that reflected government fears he still harbours radical views.
U.S. President Donald Trump reacted by saying, “I don’t like it at all.”
“Here’s a man who has not given up his proclamation of terror,” he said.
Lindh, 38, left a federal penitentiary in Terre Haute, Indiana, after getting time off for good behaviour from the 20-year sentence he received when he pleaded guilty to providing support to the Taliban.
It was not immediately clear where the man known as the “American Taliban” will live or what he will do. He turned down an interview request last week, and his attorney declined to comment Thursday.
In a Fox News interview, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo decried his early release as “unexplainable and unconscionable” and called for a review of prison system policies.
The president said he asked lawyers whether there was anything that could be done to block Lindh from getting out but was told no. Trump said the U.S. will closely monitor him.
Under restrictions imposed by a federal judge in Alexandria, Va., Lindh’s internet devices must have monitoring software; his online communications must be conducted in English; he must undergo mental health counselling; he is forbidden to possess or view extremist material; and he cannot hold a passport or leave the U.S.
John Walker Lindh is seen in these two file photos. Alexandria Sheriff's Office via AP / AP Photo, File
FBI counterterrorism officials work with federal prison authorities to determine what risk a soon-to-be-released inmate might pose.
Probation officers never explained why they sought the restrictions against Lindh. But in 2017, Foreign Policy magazine cited a National Counterterrorism Center report that said Lindh “continued to advocate for global jihad and to write and translate violent extremist texts.”
On Wednesday, NBC reported that Lindh, in a letter to a producer from Los Angeles-based affiliate KNBC, wrote in 2015 that the Islamic State group was “doing a spectacular job.”
Lindh converted to Islam as a teenager after seeing the movie “Malcolm X” and eventually made his way to Pakistan and Afghanistan and joined the Taliban. He met Osama bin Laden and was with the Taliban on Sept. 11, 2001, when al-Qaida terrorists attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
Lindh was captured on the battlefield after the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan following 9-11 and was initially charged with conspiring to kill Mike Spann, a CIA operative who died during an uprising of Taliban prisoners shortly after interrogating Lindh.
Lindh denied any role in Spann’s death. But he admitted carrying an assault rifle and two grenades.
Spann’s daughter Alison Spann, now a journalist in Mississippi, posted a letter on Twitter that she said she had sent to Trump. In it, she called Lindh’s early release “a slap in the face” to everyone killed on 9/11 and in the war on terror since then, along with “the millions of Muslims worldwide who don’t support radical extremists.”
I wrote this letter to @POTUS asking that the early release of John Walker Lindh be stopped. He’s going to be released on May 23, despite reports that he has continued to “advocate for global jihad.” This is not a reformed prisoner… pic.twitter.com/HVOryefVIE
— Alison Spann (@newsgirlalison) May 21, 2019
Republican Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby and Democratic New Hampshire Sen. Maggie Hassan also expressed concern about Lindh’s release in a letter last week to the federal Bureau of Prisons.
“We must consider the security and safety implications for our citizens and communities who will receive individuals like John Walker Lindh who continue to openly call for extremist violence,” they wrote.
The bureau defended itself Thursday in a statement that said Lindh’s release followed federal laws and guidelines. It said it works closely with outside agencies “to reduce the risk terrorist offenders pose inside and outside of prisons,” and added that no radicalized inmate has returned to federal prison on terrorism-related charges.
This file image taken Dec. 1, 2001, from television footage in Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan, shows John Walker Lindh, right, claiming to be an American Taliban volunteer. AP Video, File
Moazzam Begg, a former detainee at Guantanamo who now serves as director of outreach for London-based CAGE, which supports the rights of those accused of terror-related crimes, said the criticism over Lindh’s early release is misguided. If anything, Begg said, Lindh was imprisoned too long.
He noted that many of the other Taliban fighters who were sent to Guantanamo as enemy combatants were released much earlier.
As for Lindh’s letter in support of the Islamic State, Begg noted that it was written four years ago and that Lindh might not have had full knowledge of the group’s atrocities from behind bars.
“Nobody really knows what his views are right now in 2019,” he said.
In a statement, Begg said: “It is now time for him to be allowed to restart his life in peace and freedom.”

http://torontosun.com/news/world/ame...ears-in-prison
 
spaminator
#573
Daughter tweeted of 'torture' hours before she died in explosion at Kincora home
Kevin Martin
Published:
May 27, 2019
Updated:
May 27, 2019 11:33 PM EDT
Dorsa Dehdari, 22, was killed in a house fire in the northwest Calgary community of Kincora, which is now being investigated by homicide and arson detectives. Supplied photo
Two hours before she died in a fiery explosion police are investigating as a domestic homicide, a Calgary woman tweeted she wished her father was dead.
In the tweet, translated from Farsi for Postmedia by Shervin Ashraf, a court interpreter, Dorsa Dehdari said she was being “tortured” by her father, Heidar Dehdari.
“I wish it from bottom of my heart that my dad drops dead at once so he wouldn’t torture us anymore,” Dorsa, 22, wrote on her Twitter account @dorsad96.
“I don’t have nerve to tolerate it anymore.”
The tweet was posted at 11:55 a.m. on Saturday. At about 2 p.m., emergency crews found the bodies of Dorsa and, presumably, her father inside the home on Kincora Drive N.W. after an explosion and fire.
A memorial grows outside the home on Kincora Drive N.W. on Monday. Gavin Young/Postmedia
Dorsa’s 15-year-old sister, Dorna, was found badly injured outside the home. She is in hospital in critical condition.
A friend said Dorsa was a student at the University of Calgary and her younger sister attends Sir Winston Churchill High School.
Police said they are not looking for any suspects and friends of the sisters said the father died in the fire.
Dorsa’s Twitter feed also includes retweets about recent changes to abortion law in the U.S. One was from actress Alyssa Milano, who posted: “Not one uterus. NOT ONE UTERUS,” regarding Alabama’s new abortion law.
Another retweet, from U.S. writer Kashana Cauley said: “Kinda weird that all the pro-life movement does is kill women.”
On April 23, the girls’ mother Leila Dehdari filed for divorce, and on May 2, Heidar Dehdari was served the documents at the Kincora residence. The couple had been married for nearly 27 years, according to court documents.
In the documents, Leila Dehdari seeks primary care of their teenage daughter with the father “to have fair and liberal parenting time.”
Friends of a girl killed in an explosion in Kincora lay flowers at a memorial in front of the home. Darren Makowichuk / DARREN MAKOWICHUK/Postmedia
The mother also sought child support under the Federal Child Support Guidelines.
The documents do not mention any acrimony between the parents, who were married in Tehran on May 11, 1992.
But it does note both father and mother had the same birth surname.
“Please note the last name will be addressed within an affidavit for the record,” said a printed comment on one of the court documents, followed by the words “arrange marriage” in brackets.
The case was to be in court this Thursday for a disclosure application on behalf of the mother, seeking financial records, including tax returns, from the father.
Meanwhile, a cousin of the father’s, Mike Dehdari, said Monday night he had just talked to Heidar two days ago and “there was no indication” of any problems.
“I was shocked,” he said.
Over the weekend, friends of the two sisters told Postmedia that the siblings were very close to each other.
“People thought they were twins,” said Fariha Rahad, a close friend of Dorna’s.
Dorna had talked to their friend group about the strained relationship she had with her father, Rahad said, adding the sisters’ parents “did not have a good relationship in the house the last couple of years.”
Residents of the Kincora neighbourhood and friends of the sisters continued to visit the front yard of the family home on Monday, leaving flowers at a memorial.
KMartin@postmedia.com
On Twitter: @KMartinCourts
http://torontosun.com/news/crime/dea...ed-for-divorce
 
Cliffy
+1
#574
 
DaSleeper
#575

Philippines: Dutch
Birdwatcher Murdered
after 7 Years in Captivity
 
spaminator
+1
#576
Three men sentenced to life in India for rape, murder of girl, 8
Reuters
Published:
June 10, 2019
Updated:
June 10, 2019 8:54 AM EDT
Media gather around a Punjab Police vehicle carrying the seven accused for the rape and murder of an eight-year-old nomadic girl in Kathua in Jammu and Kashmir, as verdict is expected to be delivered at the district court in Pathankot on June 10, 2019. NARINDER NANU/AFP/Getty Images
PATHANKOT — An Indian court on Monday sentenced three men to life imprisonment for the rape and murder of an eight-year-old Muslim girl in Jammu and Kashmir state last year, a lawyer for the defense said, in a case that sparked outrage across the country.
Three other men also convicted in the case were given a five-year prison sentence, lawyer Vinod Mahajan told reporters outside the courtroom in the northern town of Pathankot.
The girl, from a nomadic Muslim community that roams the forests of Kashmir, was drugged, held captive in a temple and sexually assaulted for a week before being strangled and battered to death with a stone in January 2018.
http://torontosun.com/news/world/thr...ld-rape-murder
 
spaminator
+1
#577
Iraqi-Canadian man sentenced for role in deadly attack on U.S. base
Reuters
Published:
June 19, 2019
Updated:
June 19, 2019 10:12 AM EDT
A woman bikes by the Federal District Court in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Dec. 15, 2015.Kena Betancur / AFP / Getty Images / Files
An Iraqi-Canadian man was sentenced to 26 years in prison by a federal judge in Brooklyn on Tuesday for his role in orchestrating the April 2009 truck bombing of a U.S. base in Mosul, Iraq, that killed five soldiers, officials said.
Two Iraqi police officers also died in the explosion.
Faruq Khalil Muhammad ‘Isa, 51, pleaded guilty in March 2018 to one count of conspiring to murder Americans. The charge carries a maximum sentence of life but prosecutors agreed to a sentence of 26 years under a plea deal, U.S. Justice Department officials said.
“Today’s sentence brings some measure of earthly justice to an individual involved in the deaths of five service members,” Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Demers said in a press release.
Artist drawing of Faruq Khalil Muhammad ‘Isa by Jennifer Poburano, Jan. 20, 2011. (DRAWING BY JENNIFER POBURANO/Postmedia)
“But it cannot begin to compensate for the evil he contributed to or alleviate the pain of those family members whose lives he changed forever,” he said.
Prosecutors have said that, while living in Canada, ‘Isa conspired with a group of militants that carried out a suicide truck bombing on April 10, 2009, at the United States’ Forward Operating Base Marez in Mosul.
The jihadists ‘Isa conspired with drove a truck loaded with explosives to the gate of the military base, officials said.
The blast left a 60-foot crater, officials said in the release.
‘Isa, who was born in Iraq and is an Iraqi and Canadian citizen, was arrested in Edmonton in 2011. He is also known as Sayfildin Tahir Sharif, officials said.
http://torontosun.com/news/world/ira...ck-on-u-s-base
Last edited by spaminator; 4 weeks ago at 10:21 AM..
 
spaminator
+2
#578
Canadian jihadi jailed 26 years for conspiring to murder U.S. soldiers
Graeme Gordon
Published:
June 19, 2019
Updated:
June 19, 2019 6:30 PM EDT
Faruq Khalil Muhammad 'Isa received 26 years in a U.S. prison for his role in planning a 2009 bombing in Iraq that killed five American soldiers. (U.S. Attorney`s Office.)
A U.S. federal judge sentenced an Iraqi-Canadian man to 26 years in prison for his role in planning a 2009 suicide bombing that killed five American soldiers, two Iraqis and injured 70 others.
Faruq Khalil Muhammad ‘Isa pleaded guilty to helping plan a suicide truck bombing where more than 900 kilograms of explosives were detonated outside an entrance of a major military base in Mosul, a northern city of Iraq*.
“These five families will never be whole again,” said Becky Johnson, the mother of 24-year-old Gary Lee Woods Jr., who died in the April 2009 bombing.
Gary Lee Woods Jr. was one of five American soldiers killed in a bomb attack in Mosul, a northern city of Iraq*. (YouTube)
According to the Daily Mail, Johnson said she was “appalled” by a plea deal that resulted in Tuesday’s sentence. Johnson argued prosecuters should’ve pushed for a life sentence.
Other parents of the murdered American soldiers were also displeased with the plea deal.
U.S. District Judge Roslynn Mauskopf explained that ‘Isa had a “comparatively limited role” in the bomb attack.
‘Isa, formerly of Edmonton, was a member of a multinational terrorist group that assisted would-be suicide bombers to get to Iraq.
In 2015, he was charged with conspiring to kill Americans abroad, murdering Americans abroad, and providing material support to terrorists. He was born in Iraq and moved to Toronto in 1993, becoming a Canadian citizen four years later.
“Today’s sentence brings some measure of earthly justice to an individual involved in the deaths of five service members,” said John Demers, assistant attorney general for National Security.
The five American soldiers killed in the suicide bombing were: Sgt. Bryan E. Hall, 32, of Elk Grove, Calif.; Staff-Sgt. Gary L. Woods, 24, of Lebanon Junction, Ky.; Cpl. Jason G. Pautsch, 20, of Davenport, Iowa; Sgt. Edward W. Forrest Jr., 25, of St. Louis, Mo.; and Pte. Bryce E. Gaultier, 22, of Cyprus, Calif.
U.S. airmen transfer coffin containing the body of Army corporal Jason G. Pautsch at Dover Air Force Base back in 2009. (Tim Shaffer/Reuters)
http://macleans.ca/opinion/how-terro...it-lone-wolves
http://torontosun.com/news/crime/can...r-u-s-soldiers
 
Walter
#579
Syrian Refugee Accused Of Plotting Attack On Pa. Church
https://www.oann.com/syrian-refugee-...-on-pa-church/

Cut his balls off.
 
spaminator
#580
MANDEL: Mentally-ill attacker who targeted Canadian soldiers a terrorist — Crown
Michele Mandel
Published:
June 20, 2019
Updated:
June 20, 2019 9:18 PM EDT
Ayanle Hassan Ali.
A man with schizophrenia who attacked soldiers at a North York recruitment centre in 2016 is mentally ill, but that doesn’t mean he wasn’t a mentally ill terrorist.
Federal prosecutors will go to the Ontario Court of Appeal next week to argue Ayanle Hassan Ali should be retried after a judge found that the anti-terrorism section of the Criminal Code enacted after 9/11 isn’t designed to capture a “lone wolf” involved in terror activity and acquitted him on nine terrorism charges.
“Lone-wolf terrorists are a serious problem in Canada and abroad and their recent ‘successes’ may inspire others,” prosecutors argue in their factum filed with the appeal court ahead of Monday’s hearing. “The trial judge’s interpretation impedes the ability to arrest and charge the lone wolf.”
Ayanle Hassan Ali arrives in a police car at a Toronto courthouse on March 15, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
Regardless of the outcome of the appeal, little would change for Ali, who’s currently being held in the secure forensic unit at Hamilton’s St. Joseph’s Healthcare for treatment. The Crown agrees he’s mentally ill and should be found NCR on the terror charges. The difference, though, is that he would now be labelled a terrorist.
“The trial judge’s approach would erase the distinction between lone wolf terrorists and ordinary criminals,” prosecutors said. “A lone actor who commits an act of serious violence for a religious or ideological purpose, intending to intimidate the public, should be stigmatized with a Section 83 terrorism conviction.”
The attack lasted less than a minute.
On Mar. 14, 2016, Ali forced his way into the Yonge St. recruiting centre intent on becoming a jihadi martyr. “I have a licence to kill, I have a green light to kill,” Ali had written in his diary. “One soldier is all it takes, just one.”
He punched the first soldier repeatedly in the head, took a large kitchen knife from his folder and lunged at him, leaving a three-inch gash in the corporal’s arm.
When a sergeant rushed out of her office, Ali gave chase and narrowly missed slicing the back of her neck. He then tried to slash and stab at another sergeant, who in the chaos, had slipped on spilled coffee and fallen to the ground.
With his first blow, the blade hit the floor. Ali then continued stabbing him in the head and torso, but luckily, was now using the wrong end of his weapon.
After he was disarmed and restrained, Ali “appeared to be laughing, smiling, and giggling, and on something.” Others describe him as “not present” and “lost in the clouds.”
He told a paramedic Allah sent him “to kill people.” He told forensic psychiatrists who later examined him that soldiers were a “legitimate target.”
Ali was charged with three counts of attempted murder, three counts of assault with a weapon, two counts of assault causing bodily harm and one count of carrying a weapon — all “for the benefit of, at the direction of or in association with a terrorist group.”
MANDEL: Toronto van attack accused won’t have to face his peers
MANDEL: Extradition of med student accused of sextortion upheld on appeal
MANDEL: Boxing legend George Chuvalo’s wife wins first round in ugly family battle
Last year, Justice Ian MacDonnell acquitted him on all terror charges and not criminally responsible for the lesser included offences of attempted murder, assault and weapons offences. “The intention of Parliament in enacting (the relevant terror legislation) was not to capture the kind of lone-wolf criminal behaviour engaged in by the defendant,” MacDonnell said.
Ali’s lawyers argue that the trial judge got it right and the Crown’s appeal argument is absurd and should be dismissed. “From both a common sense and legal perspective, this was a just result. Mr. Ali is mentally ill — not a terrorist,” they wrote in their factum.
This isn’t the only decision regarding Ali under appeal by the Crown.
Federal prosecutors are also contesting a decision by the Ontario Review Board last July that would eventually allow Ali to go unaccompanied to Mohawk College across the street from the psychiatric hospital.
His psychiatrist described Ali as a “kind, careful, considerate, soft spoken person” but conceded his “risk includes his potential to act out on political or radical ideas and that there is no treatment for that.”
Funny, but isn’t that the definition of a terrorist?
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...ist-says-crown
 
spaminator
#581
Toronto imam accused of sex assault arrested boarding flight
Bryan Passifiume
Published:
June 20, 2019
Updated:
June 20, 2019 7:05 AM EDT
Imam Syed Zaidi, 49Toronto police handout
An imam accused of sexually assaulting a parishioner was arrested Tuesday while attempting to leave the country, according to Toronto Police.
Syed Zaidi, 49, was taken into custody at Pearson Airport while trying to board a flight out of Canada.
A woman approached police earlier this year about an ongoing campaign of sexual abuse spanning several years, according to the allegations.
First meeting the accused at a mosque in 2008, he allegedly convinced the victim she was possessed and needed his help, said police.
Victim ‘vindicated’ as her ex-cop rapist loses appeal
Anti-abortion preacher busted for alleged sexual abuse of teen
Police seek suspect in two TTC sex assaults
Brought to his living quarters, the woman was allegedly sexually abused under the guise of a religious ceremony.
Police said the abuse continued over several years and the victim was threatened with physical harm and exposure to the congregation and community as a means of control.
Zaidi faces a number of charges, including sexual assault and threatening death.
bpassifiume@postmedia.com
On Twitter: @bryanpassifiume
http://torontosun.com/news/crime/tor...oarding-flight
 
B00Mer
+1
#582
 
MHz
#583
Who said Muslims couldn't be trained' to act like a 'Westerner'?
https://sputniknews.com/middleeast/2...-wife-reports/
Wife of UAE Sheikh Runs Away from Country With Huge Sum Of Money, US Media Claims

Unconfirmed reports suggest that a junior wife of the ruler of Dubai, who also serves as vice president and prime minister of the UAE, has fled the country and is seeking asylum in Europe. UAE officials have yet to comment on the reports.

Princess Haya bint Hussein, one of the six wives of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, has allegedly run away with her 7-year-old son and 11-year-old daughter, according to the Daily Beast.
Princess Haya, 45, who is the daughter of the late King Hussein of Jordan, is said to have initially fled to Germany, taking nearly $40 million with her to start a new life.
The princess, who was last seen in public in May, requested asylum and Germany has approved her application “in principle”, the Daily Beast reports citing anonymous sources familiar with the matter.
Berlin is alleged to have turned down a request from Sheikh Maktoum to bring his wife back to Dubai – a move that could potentially cause a diplomatic crisis between the two countries.
It is claimed that she is currently hiding at a secret location in London. Her social media accounts have been inactive since February.
 
darkbeaver
#584
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

Canadian jihadi jailed 26 years for conspiring to murder U.S. soldiers
Graeme Gordon
Published:
June 19, 2019
Updated:
June 19, 2019 6:30 PM EDT
Faruq Khalil Muhammad 'Isa received 26 years in a U.S. prison for his role in planning a 2009 bombing in Iraq that killed five American soldiers. (U.S. Attorney`s Office.)
A U.S. federal judge sentenced an Iraqi-Canadian man to 26 years in prison for his role in planning a 2009 suicide bombing that killed five American soldiers, two Iraqis and injured 70 others.
Faruq Khalil Muhammad ‘Isa pleaded guilty to helping plan a suicide truck bombing where more than 900 kilograms of explosives were detonated outside an entrance of a major military base in Mosul, a northern city of Iraq*.
“These five families will never be whole again,” said Becky Johnson, the mother of 24-year-old Gary Lee Woods Jr., who died in the April 2009 bombing.
Gary Lee Woods Jr. was one of five American soldiers killed in a bomb attack in Mosul, a northern city of Iraq*. (YouTube)
According to the Daily Mail, Johnson said she was “appalled” by a plea deal that resulted in Tuesday’s sentence. Johnson argued prosecuters should’ve pushed for a life sentence.
Other parents of the murdered American soldiers were also displeased with the plea deal.
U.S. District Judge Roslynn Mauskopf explained that ‘Isa had a “comparatively limited role” in the bomb attack.
‘Isa, formerly of Edmonton, was a member of a multinational terrorist group that assisted would-be suicide bombers to get to Iraq.
In 2015, he was charged with conspiring to kill Americans abroad, murdering Americans abroad, and providing material support to terrorists. He was born in Iraq and moved to Toronto in 1993, becoming a Canadian citizen four years later.
“Today’s sentence brings some measure of earthly justice to an individual involved in the deaths of five service members,” said John Demers, assistant attorney general for National Security.
The five American soldiers killed in the suicide bombing were: Sgt. Bryan E. Hall, 32, of Elk Grove, Calif.; Staff-Sgt. Gary L. Woods, 24, of Lebanon Junction, Ky.; Cpl. Jason G. Pautsch, 20, of Davenport, Iowa; Sgt. Edward W. Forrest Jr., 25, of St. Louis, Mo.; and Pte. Bryce E. Gaultier, 22, of Cyprus, Calif.
U.S. airmen transfer coffin containing the body of Army corporal Jason G. Pautsch at Dover Air Force Base back in 2009. (Tim Shaffer/Reuters)
http://macleans.ca/opinion/how-terro...it-lone-wolves
http://torontosun.com/news/crime/can...r-u-s-soldiers


An obvious miscarriage of justice.
 
Cliffy
#585
 
spaminator
#586
MANDEL: Canada refuses to help secure justice for murdered Toronto man
Michele Mandel
Published:
July 12, 2019
Updated:
July 12, 2019 6:46 PM EDT
Accused killer Sepehr Yeganehfathollah, 26. Fleeing to his native Iran after allegedly killing Nader Fadaei in 2018, the Canadian government is refusing to turn over evidence that would see him tried for he murder in an Iranian courtroom. Toronto police handout
The man wanted for hacking a Toronto father to death last year with a machete sits in an Iranian prison — but not for much longer.
Hair stylist Sepehr Yeganehfathollah, 26, fled back to his Iranian homeland just hours after he allegedly killed construction worker Nader Fadaei at a Yonge St. Tim Hortons south of Steeles Ave. in what the victim’s friends insist was an unprovoked attack.
On the evening of Sept. 19, 2018, as on many evenings, Fadaei, 44, had gone to have coffee with his friends.
But this time would be tragically different.
An altercation broke out in the parking lot at about 8 p.m. when Fadaei was confronted by a man who accused him of insulting his mother.
According to witnesses, Yeganehfathollah’s mother had wrongly identified Fadaei as someone who had done her wrong.
“It was a case of mistaken identity,” says Shawn, the family’s spokesman who is too fearful to have his last name used.
“The last thing Nader said was ‘I don’t know your mother.’”
Fadaei, a father of two and sole breadwinner of the family, was first allegedly punched by Yeganehfathollah.
When he threw his coffee to defend himself, his attacker drew a 72-cm machete from his pants and slashed Fadaei from his shoulder through to his rib cage in a gruesome blow.
He died shortly after arriving in hospital.
Murder victim Nader Fadaei, 44 Supplied photo
Before Toronto Police could put out a Canada-wide warrant for his arrest with a warning that he was armed and dangerous, Yeganehfathollah was already on a plane bound for Turkey and then Iran.
Toronto Police told them their hands were tied. They passed the information on to Interpol, which issued a red notice for his arrest on charges of first-degree murder.
This past February, a homicide officer contacted them with wonderful news: Yeganehfathollah had been picked up in Iran.
Fadaei’s family and friends were thrilled. They believed justice was at hand.
They were wrong.
Yeganehfathollah was denying any part in Fadaei’s death. There’s no extradition treaty with Iran, but authorities there were prepared to prosecute him if they received the evidence gathered by Toronto Police, including the security video that had captured the killing.
The homicide detectives were happy to hand it over, but this was above their pay grade.
They’d have to get authorization from the attorney general — authorization that was ultimately denied.
Man wanted in deadly attack in North York
T.O.’S DEADLIEST YEAR: On track for most blood spilled
“I know that this situation is frustrating. We have been working many hours on this case. We have really done everything possible at our level to secure some form of justice for Nader and his family,” Det. Const. Charles Crangle wrote Shawn in a March email.
“Please understand that the decision to send or not send documents and our evidentiary files does not rest with us (police.) This decision rests with the Attorney General and the Department of Justice. They decide on these types of political matters.”
Shawn believes the Canadian government is refusing to send the evidence because Yeganehfathollah could face the death penalty if convicted.
But Shawn insists that sentence would be commuted to life because the family has agreed to accept compensation from him in return.
“His widow is in dire straits. She needs the money,” he explained.
But Canada appears to be more worried about an accused killer, Shawn argues.
“We have to save an alleged murderer who ran away from our justice system? Canada wants to go the extra mile to save the life of an accused killer rather than help a widow left with two kids?” he demands.
The family’s lawyer Rocco Achampong has just learned that Iranian police will only hold Yeganehfathollah for one more week unless they receive the Toronto evidence.
He can file a freedom of information request but that will take months.
“I don’t have that time. I need help to get these documents to Iran,” the lawyer says.
“I need to send it as soon as possible to assist them in holding this man accountable – or else an alleged killer is going to walk free and disappear.”
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...ed-toronto-man
 
spaminator
#587
MANDEL: No one errs on side of caution in military stabber's case
Michele Mandel
Published:
July 16, 2019
Updated:
July 16, 2019 6:58 PM EDT
Ayanle Hassan Ali.
Fresh off his big win at the Ontario Court of Appeal this week, college-bound military stabber Ayanle Hassan Ali has another annual hearing Wednesday before the Ontario Review Board.
Found not criminally responsible for his 2016 stabbing frenzy at a Canadian Forces recruiting centre, Ali is already cleared to attend classes at Mohawk College across the street from his Hamilton psychiatric hospital without supervision — a privilege challenged by the Crown but just upheld by Ontario’s top court.
What further freedoms will his legal team be asking for now, just 15 months after he was found not criminally responsible for his crime.
Ali, 31, has been diagnosed with schizophrenia and held in the secure forensic unit at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in Hamilton ever since he burst into the North York recruiting office wielding a large kitchen knife.
“I have a licence to kill; I have a green light to kill,” Ali had written in his diary. “One soldier is all it takes, just one.”
He began his sudden attack by punching, slashing and stabbing a corporal at the entrance to the Yonge St. recruiting centre.
When a sergeant came out of her office to find out what was wrong, Ali chased her and narrowly missed slicing the back of her neck. He then tried to slash and stab another sergeant who’d slipped and fallen to the ground, but fortunately Ali was using the wrong end of his knife.
“The attack was motivated by his radical religious and ideological beliefs, in large part precipitated by mental disorder, which led him to believe that killing Canadian military personnel was justified because of Canadian military actions overseas and that he would obtain martyrdom in doing so,” the Crown had argued on appealing his college privileges.
Originally facing nine charges — including three counts of attempted murder — all “for the benefit of, at the direction of or in association with a terrorist group,” Ali was acquitted in May 2018 on the terror part of the indictment after the judge found no evidence he was acting on behalf of any group. He was instead found not criminally responsible (NCR) by reason of mental disorder of the lesser, included offences.
The Crown also appealed his acquittal on the terror charges last month and a decision is still outstanding.
Committed to ORB oversight, Ali must have a review hearing every year to assess his progress and ensure he’s under the least onerous conditions.
At his first hearing last July, the ORB stunned many — including the Crown — by allowing Ali to attend college classes, first under supervision, but eventually on his own, despite their finding that he “still poses a significant threat to the safety of the public” and “holds some of the same delusions, that he experienced at the time of the (attack).”
The Crown accused the ORB of failing to properly take public safety into account by accelerating Ali from lockdown with zero privileges to walking alone around campus within the year — especially when this was his first review and he had no track record of compliance.
Ruling allowing military stabber to attend college on own upheld
MANDEL: Mentally-ill attacker who targeted Canadian soldiers a terrorist — Crown
MANDEL: Mentally ill stabber in army recruiting centre attack to be allowed into community
Why the rush? Why was no one erring on the side of caution just months after he was found NCR?
The appeal court, though, ruled Monday that there was nothing wrong with the ORB plan, finding their “decision was not unreasonable.”
Did anyone ask Ali’s fellow students if they feel the same way?
Mohawk College wouldn’t confirm whether Ali attended classes this year, has registered for the fall session or whether students and faculty would be notified.
“We still will not comment on any student’s applicant status as every student has a right to privacy,” said spokesman Sean Coffey.
Hopefully, we’ll get more answers about Ali’s scholastic career at his next hearing. As to what privileges are next, could unsupervised visits into the community be far behind?
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...-stabbers-case
 
spaminator
#588
Ruling allowing military stabber to attend college on own upheld
Canadian Press
Published:
July 16, 2019
Updated:
July 16, 2019 8:38 AM EDT
Ayanle Hassan Ali.
Ontario’s top court has upheld a decision allowing a man found not criminally responsible in a knife attack at a Toronto military recruitment centre to eventually take college classes on his own.
The appeal court says the Ontario Review Board considered all the required factors last year in granting Ayanle Hassan Ali permission to attend Mohawk College unaccompanied when staff at the secure Hamilton hospital where he’s detained deem he is ready.
The three-judge appeal panel further says it was “not unreasonable” for the board to ban Ali from known military facilities or centres rather than the more restrictive measure sought by the Crown — a prohibition from contacting any military personnel.
Prosecutors had challenged the board’s ruling, saying too much consideration had been given to Ali’s needs and too little to public safety.
They argued awarding such privileges was unreasonable given that it was Ali’s first review and he had no track record to rely on.
Mentally-ill attacker who targeted Canadian soldiers a terrorist: Crown
Crown opposes bid to let mentally-ill stabber attend college
Stabber in army recruiting centre attack allowed to attend Mohawk College
The Crown said Ali’s compliance with the rules on his highly restricted hospital ward is not the same as having “unsupervised access” to the college.
The review board — which annually evaluates the status of anyone found not criminally responsible or unfit to stand trial for criminal offences due to mental illness — found Ali continues to pose a significant threat to the public and should remain at the hospital.
But it also granted him gradually increasing privileges that began with permission to travel through the hospital and grounds with staff, then with an approved companion, and eventually under “indirect supervision,” which means being unaccompanied.
If that went well, Ali could then follow similar steps into the community for education purposes, specifically to go to Mohawk College, which is across the street from the hospital, the board said.
In a decision released Monday, the Appeal Court said arguments related to public safety were made at the hearing and, as such, were weighed by the board.
“It is clear from the reasons of the board and the conduct of the hearing that the board carefully considered all of the required factors in making its disposition regarding the limited indirect supervision privilege and made no error of law. Its decision was not unreasonable,” the appeal court said.
“The limited extension of indirectly supervised access only to the local college shows that the board was extending only a very limited privilege, both geographically and in terms of time away, that reflected its concern for public safety but balanced with the need to facilitate Mr. Ali’s reintegration into society.”
At the initial hearing, the Crown had sought an order barring Ali from contacting any military personnel, but his lawyers argued Ali would not know if someone in plain clothes might be in the military. At the appeal, prosecutors said the condition could have been modified to avoid such concerns by prohibiting contact with uniformed personnel.
The Appeal Court noted Ali is scheduled to appear before the board on Wednesday and such a condition may be discussed at that time.
Ali attacked several uniformed military personnel with a large knife in March 2016 and wounded at least two people before he was overpowered and subdued.
He was charged with attempted murder, assault causing bodily harm and assault with a weapon, as well as carrying a weapon, all for the benefit of a terrorist group.
Last year, an Ontario judge found that while Ali carried out the attack based on his extremist beliefs, the formation of those beliefs was precipitated by mental illness. The judge also found Ali was not acting on behalf of or for the benefit of a terrorist group.
As a result, Ali was cleared on the terror element of the charges and found not criminally responsible on the lesser included offences.
Prosecutors are also appealing that finding, arguing Ali should be considered a terrorist even though he acted alone. They say Ali should still be considered not criminally responsible, but on the terror charges rather than the lesser ones, and are seeking a new trial on that issue.
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...-on-own-upheld
 
MHz
#589
Family feuds are now terrorist events, if it involves Muslims only??? Welcome to the Jewish version of Canada. Next we will be doing medical experiments on our least protected people. I'm pretty sure that kills more in a week than Muslims have killed in Canada in a 100 years.
 
spaminator
#590
MANDEL: NCR stabber wants passes and overnight stays with Toronto family
Michele Mandel
Published:
July 17, 2019
Updated:
July 17, 2019 8:32 PM EDT
Ayanle Hassan Ali.
HAMILTON — Following negative media publicity and a blowback from some staff, students and their parents, the mentally-ill man who attacked soldiers at a Toronto military recruiting office won’t be bound for Mohawk College after all.
He’ll likely be heading somewhere else.
Found not criminally responsible (NCR) last year for the 2016 stabbing attack, Ayanle Hassan Ali, 31, sat quietly in a grey suit before the Ontario Review Board in the locked forensic unit at St. Joseph’s Healthcare where he’s lived since his arrest.
At his second annual review, everyone around the boardroom table agreed Ali, who suffers from schizophrenia, has made good progress but continues to pose a “significant threat.”
And then they went on to discuss all the added privileges they believe he should be eligible to earn over the upcoming year.
The hospital and his psychiatrist, Dr. Gary Chaimowitz, recommended the board clear him to have unaccompanied passes into southern Ontario and travel within a 50-kilometre radius of Hamilton for education or employment. They also agreed with a request by his lawyer Maureen Addie that he be eligible for 48-hour overnight passes to Toronto under the supervision of his father or sister.
None of these would be automatic, they hastened to add, but would be implemented slowly by the hospital as Ali improves. “We take risk to the community as our priority,” insisted Chaimowitz.
Yet he decried the community uproar about their plans to allow Ali to attend Mohawk College across the street from the hospital. The story – first revealed here last year – was back in the news this week after the Court of Appeal upheld the ORB’s controversial decision to allow him to enrol and eventually go on his own.
Those plans have now been scuttled, Chaimowitz told the board, because the “unflattering” media coverage led them to worry that Ali himself might be in danger from another student.
But what of the danger he poses?
Only Crown attorney Craig Fraser opposed the extension of Ali’s privileges in the face of continuing concerns about his mental health.
According to his psychiatrist, Ali continues to get messages from the Internet and TV that the military is keeping tabs on him and still believes Canadian soldiers are legitimate targets due to their missions to Muslim lands. “His psychotic disorder is not completely treated,” conceded Chaimowitz. “I still have work in the future.”
In fact, Ali’s belief system hasn’t changed much since he stormed into the Yonge St. office armed with a kitchen knife.
“He still feels it is his obligation to do something about it,” Fraser warned.
MANDEL: No one errs on side of caution in military stabber’s case
MANDEL: Mentally-ill attacker who targeted Canadian soldiers a terrorist — Crown
“The essence of risk remains and as long as the essence of risk remains, the paramount consideration for the board is the protection of the public,” he argued. “If the essence of risk is unchanged, why should the disposition change?”
Chaimowitz maintained that Ali’s risk is being well managed by anti-psychotic medication and chats with a local imam as well as a Saudi psychiatrist here on a fellowship.
While the patient still has thoughts of martyrdom and his “obligation” to do something, Ali’s symptoms have “not abated but are significantly reduced” and the psychiatrist believes there’s a “low likelihood” he’ll act on those thoughts and attack another soldier.
But just to be cautious, he agreed with Fraser that there should be a no-contact order with uniformed military personnel.
As for Ali venturing unaccompanied into the community, all but the Crown thought that was a grand idea for the upcoming year.
The ORB has reserved its decision.
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...toronto-family
 
spaminator
#591
12 Israeli youths arrested in Cyprus in alleged rape of British tourist
Reuters
Published:
July 18, 2019
Updated:
July 18, 2019 9:36 AM EDT
Twelve Israeli tourists, suspected of raping a 19-year-old British girl in Ayia Napa, arrive to the court premises with their faces covered in Paralimni on July 18, 2019, for a remand hearing conducted behind closed doors. - The suspects were held in Cyprus police custody as the authorities investigate claims by a British teenager that she was gang raped at her hotel in the popular holiday resort of Ayia Napa on July 17. The suspects appeared before a district court in Paralimni where the judge agreed to a police request to detain them in custody for eight days while investigators complete their enquiries into possible charges of rape and conspiracy to rape.- / AFP/Getty Images
ATHENS — A court in Cyprus on Thursday remanded 12 Israeli youths in custody on suspicion of an alleged rape of a 19-year-old British tourist at a holiday resort on the island.
The youths, aged between 16 and 18, are alleged to have raped the woman in a hotel room in Ayia Napa, a resort on the southeastern coast popular with holidaymakers.
The woman told police the incident happened on Wednesday morning in her hotel room. Medical examiners said they found bruises and scratches on the woman.
The suspects and the alleged victim had been holidaying in Ayia Napa, which is known for its all-night party lifestyle.
The suspects, who have not been charged, were taken before a district court in the nearby town of Paralimni on Thursday where a local magistrate remanded them in custody for eight days, pending completion of inquiries.
In accordance with Cypriot law on rape cases and because some of the suspects are legally minors, proceedings were conducted behind closed doors.
The suspects covered their faces with their T-shirts as they were being escorted in and out of the court building. One was in tears, according to SigmaLive, a Cypriot news portal.
http://torontosun.com/news/crime/12-...ritish-tourist
 
MHz
#592
All these types of threads are showing is that a few members of the flock are bonkers in all religions. What will be hard to uncover is why the Bible is still a mystery after it was finished 2,000 years ago and 1,000's upon 1,000's have studied it and not one sane version exists in print today? That takes a lot of effort on the part of the ones who should be the shepherds, the governments of the nations were left in charge and they will pay a price for being slack.
The false teaching all come from one source.
 
Cliffy
+1
#593
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

All these types of threads are showing is that a few members of the flock are bonkers in all religions. What will be hard to uncover is why the Bible is still a mystery after it was finished 2,000 years ago and 1,000's upon 1,000's have studied it and not one sane version exists in print today? That takes a lot of effort on the part of the ones who should be the shepherds, the governments of the nations were left in charge and they will pay a price for being slack.
The false teaching all come from one source.

You?
 
spaminator
#594
Breast ironing is abuse and could lead to jail: U.K. prosecutors
Reuters
Published:
July 19, 2019
Updated:
July 19, 2019 8:15 AM EDT
A official checks the passport of a passenger recently arrived from Mumbai in India in Terminal 2 at Heathrow Airport in London on July 16, 2019, part of Operation Limelight, a national multi-agency safeguarding operation at the UK border that focuses on harmful practices. - In collaboration with Border Force, specialist officers from the Met's Continuous Policing Improvement Command will be carrying out preventative and detection work in relation to inbound flights that have travelled from or via 'countries of prevalence' for forced marriage, female genital mutilation (FGM) and honour based abuse and breast ironing.DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS / AFP/Getty Images
By Lin Taylor
LONDON, July 19 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Breast ironing – where a young girl’s breasts are compressed to stop them developing – is child abuse and could lead to 10 years in jail, British prosecutors said on Friday.
The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said it issued new guidance to give victims, police and prosecutors the confidence to sentence those who perform breast ironing, which is designed to stop adolescent girls attracting male attention.
It is most prevalent in West African communities.
“Our message is simple: breast ironing is child abuse,” said Jaswant Narwal, a chief crown prosecutor. “The practice inflicts serious damage on young girls and can leave them scarred physically and mentally for the rest of their lives.”
Britain has no specific law banning the practice, but it could fall under the offenses of child cruelty and causing or allowing a child to suffer serious harm, the CPS said. Both crimes are punishable by up to 10 years in prison.
Assault charges could also be brought, the legal guidance said.
“Although this abuse often occurs in a family setting, the CPS is clear that a crime is committed when actual harm is caused to a girl – regardless of consent. It is not possible to consent to serious assault,” Narwal said in a statement.
There is no official data on how many girls have undergone breast ironing in Britain. The Came Women and Girls Development Organisation, a British charity that helps people from disadvantaged communities, estimates it is about 1,000 girls.
British-based charity Forward, which supports survivors of female genital mutilation (FGM) in African communities, said it had not come across breast ironing cases in the country so far.
Breast ironing can lead to psychological trauma and serious health effects, including cysts, infection and scarring, according to Britain’s National FGM Centre.
Some families use large heated stones to compress a girl’s breast tissue and some also tightly bind the girl’s breasts to prevent them from growing, said the Centre, run by children’s charity Barnardo’s and the Local Government Association.
“At a time when they should be enjoying being young, no girl should be subject to these harmful practices, which cannot be justified for any reason,” said Leethen Bartholomew, head of the National FGM Centre, in a statement.
“We hope (the guidance) will be useful not just to those in the legal profession, but will help inform families and communities that breast-ironing and flattening are illegal.”
http://torontosun.com/news/world/bre...-k-prosecutors
 

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