Ontario was right to eliminate electric car subsidies


petros
#91
Oh yes it can bubba. "Fast charge" isn't a full charge and the cuts your battery life in half.

Batteries hate high amp charging.

Another thing, you have to park in a heated garage. There goes any environmental benefits right there.
 
Hoid
#92
you would be best to avoid all technical subjects.
 
Ron in Regina
#93
The 110V Charger charges at 2-3%/hour of a 100% full charge for a Tesla. Look at a map of Western Canada. A gerry can will get me to the next service station to fill my fuel tank. There's not 220V Electric Charging Stations (at this point anyway) accessible to the general public in almost every town like there are for gas and diesel vehicles.
 
Hoid
#94
The argument was not about whether the 110v charger was fast it was whether it existed or not.

It only became about how long it took when the goalposts were moved because obviously they exist.

The new goal post move is that super chargers decease battery life - which is moot since all tesla batterys have an 8 year unlimited mileage warranty.

I eagerly await the next moving of the goal posts.
Last edited by Hoid; Sep 23rd, 2018 at 03:01 PM..
 
Ron in Regina
#95
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

"it can take day s to get a full charge for a Tesla. "

stop writing stupid shit

you clearly have no idea what you are even talking about.


This is from a Forum of Tesla Owners, but they
must all be Clowns too for buying Tesla's and
posting their experiences for other Tesla owners
in a conspiracy against you...
Last edited by Ron in Regina; Sep 23rd, 2018 at 03:03 PM..Reason: spacing
 
Hoid
#96
So there is such a thing as 110v charging?

its odd that Ron from Regina did not take issue with this piece of wisdom

"Like phones and tools, plugs batteries chargers and accessories are proprietary and are 240V and up."

Come on Ron!

Save Petros from his own stupidity willya.
Last edited by Hoid; Sep 23rd, 2018 at 03:11 PM..
 
Ron in Regina
#97
Now, the above talks about someone commuting 6
miles to work, and he (or she) gets about 30 miles
of charge in 8hrs at 110V. The guy I'm talking about
lives east of Regina a bit and bought a Tesla. Look
where he had to go to buy one from a dealer:

What goalposts are you talking about?
Last edited by Ron in Regina; Sep 23rd, 2018 at 03:10 PM..Reason: spacing
 
Hoid
#98
Not to worry Ron.

Its way over your head
 
Ron in Regina
+1
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

So there is such a thing as 110v charging?

its odd that Ron from Regina did not take issue with this piece of wisdom

"Like phones and tools, plugs batteries chargers and accessories are proprietary and are 240V and up."

Come on Ron!

Save Petros from his own stupidity willya.


Ugh....talk about moving goal posts. I stated that at 110V
it can take days (plural) to fully charge a Tesla battery.
That would imply that there is such a thing as a 110V
charger for these vehicles. Come on Man! Now you're
being deliberately obtuse.

You stated that I was a clown for stating this. There's
your moving goal post.
Last edited by Ron in Regina; Sep 23rd, 2018 at 03:17 PM..Reason: spacing
 
Ron in Regina
#100
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Not to worry Ron.

Its way over your head

Really? Dispute what I've stated. Provide links.
 
Hoid
#101
issue was whether or not 110V chargers existed.
you are now raving about charging times and distance to dealerships.
every time one of the arguments is proven false you create different arguments.
That is what "moving the goalposts" means.
here is an example post:
"Oh yes it can bubba. "Fast charge" isn't a full charge and the cuts your battery life in half.
Batteries hate high amp charging.
Another thing, you have to park in a heated garage. There goes any environmental benefits right there."

not satisfied with lying about 110v chargers and battery life Really Stupid Guy is compelled to thrown in some sort of bullshit about heated garages and environmental benefits.
Last edited by Hoid; Sep 23rd, 2018 at 03:26 PM..
 
petros
#102
110V 12A "trickle charger". Trickle as in days to charge.

When we speak of "trickle charging" the Tesla, we mean 12A @ 120V. That's a "trickle", compared to the 80A @ 240V the HPWC can deliver

Big difference.

That 12A will barely cover vampire draw.
 
Hoid
#103
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

110V 2A "trickle charger". Trickle as in days to charge.

but but but all chargers are 240v and up???
 
Ron in Regina
#104



My statement, your reply. Dispute my statement.
 
Hoid
#105
Why does how long it takes to charge enter into the discussion of whether they exist or not?


See?

That's the stupid part.
 
Ron in Regina
#106
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Why does how long it takes to charge enter into the discussion of whether they exist or not?


See?

That's the stupid part.

Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Days is it?

lol

When are you clowns going to grow up?

This the part that I question you about. Your
quote. Your statement 'disputing' mine. State
your case.
 
Hoid
#107
are you saying that 110v chargers do not exist?
 
petros
#108
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

are you saying that 110v chargers do not exist?

Are you basing shit off this?

Quote:

Wakie wakie hands off snakie.
You are dreaming if you think it's ANY outlet.

Like phones and tools, plugs batteries chargers and accessories are proprietary and are 240V and up.

Can I plug the car in directly to a wall socket or do I need proprietary accessories?
 
Ron in Regina
#109
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

are you saying that 110v chargers do not exist?

Are you deliberately being obtuse? Do you
think that's what I'm saying as I talk about
charging times on a Tesla at 110V?


You're throwing out the insults. Dispute me.
Last edited by Ron in Regina; Sep 23rd, 2018 at 04:09 PM..Reason: spacing
 
Hoid
#110
https://www.futurenissan.com/nissan-leaf/

Nissan Leaf takes about 20 hours to charge on 110V

happy now Ron?
 
Ron in Regina
#111
 
Ron in Regina
#112
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

https://www.futurenissan.com/nissan-leaf/

Nissan Leaf takes about 20 hours to charge on 110V

happy now Ron?


Interesting. How about the Tesla Model S?
 
Hoid
#113
Is 20 hours days and days?
 
Hoid
#114
Mini Cooper Countryman

about 6 hours to full charge in level one (110v)

is 6 hours "days and days"

maybe on Mercury
 
Hoid
#115
re Tesla S : wouldn't you need to specify which battery is in it?
Last edited by Hoid; Sep 23rd, 2018 at 04:31 PM..
 
petros
#116
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

https://www.futurenissan.com/nissan-leaf/
Nissan Leaf takes about 20 hours to charge on 110V
happy now Ron?

From the link you provided.

Quote:

The LEAF is powered by an 80kW electric motor and 24kWh lithium-ion battery pack, enabling it to travel approximately 100 miles on a charge.

20hrs of charging to go 160km.

Stellar!
 
Hoid
#117
Nissan leaf full charge in 20 hours

Mini Cooper full charge in 6 hours

Questions?
 
petros
#118
What's the range at -30C with the heater on?
 
petros
#119
One more.

Why do they deserve subsidies?
 
petros
#120
https://www.caa.ca/electric-vehicles...tric-vehicles/

Frequently Asked Questions

What’s the difference between battery electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles?

Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) are powered solely by electricity. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are powered by both gasoline and electricity. When a hybrid vehicle’s battery runs out of electricity, an internal combustion engine takes over to supply power. All electric vehicles also produce electricity through a process known as regenerative braking, which uses the vehicle’s electric motor to assist in slowing the vehicle, and to recover some of the energy normally converted to heat by the brakes.

What kinds of hybrid electric vehicles are there?

There are two types of hybrid electric vehicles on the market: hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Vehicles commonly known as Hybrids (HEVs) on the road today have two complementary drive systems and regenerate their own electricity to feed their batteries. They use a gasoline engine with a fuel tank, and an electric motor, battery and controls. Plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) run on a battery and electric drive train that depends on the power grid to charge the battery via plug-ins. They also have the support of an internal combustion engine that may be used to recharge the vehicle’s battery and/or to replace the electric drive train when the battery is low and more power is required. Typically, because plug-in hybrids use electricity from the power grid, consumers realize more savings than they would with a traditional hybrid car.

How do you recharge an electric vehicle?

Electric vehicles can typically be charged overnight from any regular household outlet. This takes approximately the same amount of energy as it would to heat a 40€‘gallon (150-litre) hot water tank. There is an ever-expanding network of charging stations that provide 240V chargers and effectively cut charging time in half. A car needs a J1772 connecter to plug into a 240V outlet. Installation of this connector costs about $1,200. Some manufacturers also offer up to 480V fast chargers that provide an 80% recharge in 20 to 30 minutes. There are two types of fast recharge connectors: CHAdeMo and COMBO. Some manufacturers offer one or the other as an option. Retrofits are not possible if the vehicle is delivered without one.

How far can I drive before having to recharge my electric vehicle?

While range is affected by road conditions and driving habits, the current average is 140 to 450 km (depending on the make). Drivers of EVs generally adopt habits, like coasting to a stop, that dramatically reduce power consumption and stretch out the distance that can be travelled on a full charge.

How fast can an electric car go?

This largely depends on the vehicle’s make and model and the type of electric motor powering it. However, highway-capable electric vehicles can drive up to about 140 kilometers per hour, with acceleration comparable or superior to those running on internal combustion engines. Just like sub-compacts with internal combustion engines, smaller electric vehicles have lower rates of speed and acceleration.

Are electric vehicles safe?

Yes. Manufacturers of electric vehicles must meet all the same federal safety requirements as any vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine. Because manufacturers have a vested interest in the success and sustainability of the electric vehicle industry, demonstrating that these vehicles are safe is a top priority. The Tesla Model S, for example, received the highest safety rating ever awarded to a vehicle under NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) tests.

How long do batteries last, and how much does it cost to replace them?

Electric vehicle batteries are covered by 8-year manufacture warranties, but the batteries can last much longer. At approximately 1/3 the cost of the car, they are expensive to replace, but prices are expected to drop substantially by 2020.

How well do electric vehicles do in winter?

The primary effect of cold weather on electric cars is a reduction in their range: one vehicle that was tested dropped from a range of 155 km on a warm day to just over 100 km average in the winter, and approximately 75 km in extreme cold weather (-25C).

Doesn’t the damage to the environment done by producing electricity outweigh the benefits of reducing gasoline and diesel consumption?

The bottom line is that the reduction of greenhouse gasses resulting from the utilization of electric cars more than offsets these concerns. To find out how much an EV generates in greenhouse gasses in your province, click here.

Why can’t I find an electric vehicle charging station near me on the map?

New charging stations are continually becoming available. We update the map data on a regular basis with new information about EV charging stations across the country. To let us know about a charging station, please email us.