Heritage: Tell us about your roots


Haggis McBagpipe
#1
Peapod asked me a question that seems ideal for a thread of its very own: the subject of our heritage.

Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

Haggis I just have to ask, with a name like haggis are you scottish. My grandfather was a Fraser from inverness.

Peapod, I am Canadian, from the land where one foot is shorter than the other (West Van) (hilly). I have a solid Scottish background, both sides of the family, with clans Lamont, Morrison, Gair, McKechnie to name a few. My dad was 1st generation Canadian, born in Vancouver in 1917.

My uncle paid a small fortune to trace the family tree back to some ungodly long time ago, the 15th century or something, and true to his Scottish nature he refused to tell anybody else what he discovered because, he said, "If you want to know then you'll have to pay for your own bloody search!" 8-)
 
American Voice
#2
Or maybe he discovered someone had been hanged for stealing a horse.

Dead ancestors thread, eh? One thing I discovered when I undertook a genealogy project several years ago, and that is this: that there is NOTHING so interesting as my dead ancestors, and NOTHING so boring as yours!

But seriously, it is a fascinating subject. For years, now and then, I have been working on a dramatic biography of one of mine, with the idea of maybe producing a 90 minute film, as well. But I'd have to get a grant for that.

I have documentation on all of my direct lineal ancestors going back five generations, across the board. I have a couple of lines going back even farther. I am mostly German, some French, Swiss, and one line of English. All of my ancestors were settled here in Columbus before the Civil War, with the exception of my Dad's mother, who came from a county north of here, and whose people had been there since frontier days.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by American Voice

there is NOTHING so interesting as my dead ancestors, and NOTHING so boring as yours!

This made me smile! There is some truth to it in that I have no desire to read reams of information about the history of others... yet I love these quick snapshots of people.

I forgot to mention, I had ancestors in Boston during the American Revolution, they were United Empire Loyalists, and that is how that particular branch came to be in Canada (Nova Scotia).
 
Numure
#4
My ancesters, the ones I know of (Mothers side), came here in 1651 from France (Pitou to be precise). They settled near Québec City (on the farm lands around it at the time). On father sides, we have traced them to 1480, in Lisbonne (Portugal), apparently, the migrated to France, and then my ancesters left for the new world (they went to Acadie). They escaped the massive deportation when the English took over Acadie, and moved to New-France (Québec).

I think I'll dig up the vulumes my oncles and aunts made a few years back on my families history. Always instresting .
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#5
My god, Numure, since 1651! That is very impressive. The diaries of your uncles and aunts are truly a piece of Canadian history, and would be very interesting.
 
American Voice
#6
Haggis wrote: "I forgot to mention, I had ancestors in Boston during the American Revolution, they were United Empire Loyalists, and that is how that particular branch came to be in Canada (Nova Scotia)."

My ancestor Thomas Whitaker was born in Cecil, Maryland.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Family Group 98


196 Thomas Whittaker B May 29 1731(Maryland) D Jul 21 1791(PA)
(son of Robert Whittaker and Mary MSU) FG196
married Jan 2 1760 St. Maryannes Parish, Cecil, Maryland
197 Elizabeth Rogers B
(daughter of Rowland Rogers and Ann MSU) FG197
residence St. Maryannes Parish, Cecil, Maryland
98 son Thomas B Jun 17 1763 D 1783 FG49
m. Catherine Wells? (cf. FG49)
49 dau Catherine B Mar 2 1782 D Nov 21 1870 FG24
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Family Group 49


98 Thomas Whitaker B Jun 17 1763(MD) D 1783
(son of Thomas Whittaker and Elizabeth Rogers) FG98
married poss. St. Maryannes Parish, Cecil, Maryland
99 Catherine Wells? poss. based on names found in FG24
(daughter of Unknown; poss. surname Wells, and Unknown) FG99
residence Burgettstown, Washington Co., Pennsylvania
49 dau Catherine B Mar 2 1782 D Nov 21 1870 FG24
m. James Comly Mar 1 1801 (1779-1827) FG48
24 son Bezaleel Wells B Aug 28 1804 D Oct 13 1855 FG12
(eight other children)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Although the grandson of Quaker immigrants from England, in 1777, Thomas Whitaker joined the colonial militia in Maryland, and served one year as a fifer. In 1778, he signed up with the militia in Pennsylvania. He shouldered a musket with Gibson's Company, Third Battalion, Cumberland County Militia, the Pennsylvania Line, under the command of Gen. "Mad" Anthony Wayne. As payment for his service, he received title to a piece of land on the western frontier, just east of what is now Youngstown, Ohio.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#7
Another long-standing North American. This is making me wish I had a clearer picture of my history. Oh, I do have an illustrious ancestor, Alexander Graham Bell.
 
American Voice
#8
Without whom we couldn't be doing this thing here!
 
Numure
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Haggis McBagpipe

My god, Numure, since 1651! That is very impressive. The diaries of your uncles and aunts are truly a piece of Canadian history, and would be very interesting.

They we're some of the first settlers so to speak. Québec City was established in 1608. And yes, the volumes are something. Though I never read them all, its work that goes down generations, tring to trace my families roots, how they lived, their brothers and sisters... Pretty much everything about them.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Numure

its work that goes down generations, tring to trace my families roots, how they lived, their brothers and sisters... Pretty much everything about them.

You are very fortunate to have this, what a wonderful thing!
 
peapod
#11
This is so interesting. I to started my family genealogy, and became completely obessed. It got so bad that instead of braking at garage sales I was braking at graveyards. For a long time I knew the birth and death dates of several generations of ancestors but forget these dates with living family. It really consumes you. At one point I started putting the tree on the wall in my computer room in black marker.

My mothers father's family came to canada on the highland clearances and settled in Nova Scotia, some of the family members a few generations later settled in eastern seaboard of the untied states. My grandmothers family came from England to Quebec in the late 1800's when they were giving land away to attract settlers.

On my scottish side of the family I found an entire fond in the nova scotia archives on one of my ancestors. A very brave lass who went to Armenia to assist refugees during the the ottoman reign. She assisted thousand of refugees, setting up a hospital and school in Varna Bulgaria. The archbishop of malachia the patriarch of the armenians in turkey bestowed upon her his ecumenical blessing. This said to be a most unusual thing, very rarely is the ecumenical blessing bestowed upon anyone outside the armenian church. All of this before the age of 30. I even was able to have the photographs of her in the fond copied and sent to me.

My father's family is still a mystery to me, although I have made attempts to learn more. Its very difficult because I do not speak french. My father and his family were from Quebec city and came to canada from france in the 1600's. My dad left home when he was 12, I suspect it was not a good home, as he never returned or saw his 7 brothers and sisters again. My dad never spoke french to us and would not teach it to us. This is really sad for me, because that part of my hertiage is lost to me, and it appears that it is a rich hertiage and culture. I must stop now because I will go on hours.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#12
I'm glad you asked me that question last night! This is proving to be good fun. That's sad about your dad not allowing French to be spoken, but you could still learn it.
 
peapod
#13
Haggis what is the name of the loyalist you mention that settled in nova scotia. I have alot of genealogy software, and there is alot of information on this group, if you don't mind giving me the name I can check it out for you.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

Haggis what is the name of the loyalist you mention that settled in nova scotia. I have alot of genealogy software, and there is alot of information on this group, if you don't mind giving me the name I can check it out for you.

Hey, Peapod, that is awfully nice of you! I am not sure I have the name, I have a jumbled mess of stuff that is kicking around somewhere in a box, bits and pieces from my mum and so on. My mum was born in Eureka, Nova Scotia in 1917, but they were somewhere else in Nova Scotia before that. They had a sheep farm, I believe. I will see if I can find that box of stuff. Thanks again!
 
researchok
#15
Short version.

Antecedants left Spain for Holland in the early 1500's. Left for England in the late 1500's ( I think those wooden shoes just killed em).

Branch of family moved to Quebec City in early 1700's. Been in North America ever since.
 
peapod
#16
Haggis your town is in Pitcou county, not surprised it is steeped in scottish roots. It is also where my Fraser roots come from. I sure hope the name is not as common as "fraser" this clan was very busy making merry and they had a limited slection of naming, John was their favorite, makes for long and difficult sleuthing.

Eureka This village was named after the Eureka Milling Company located near here in Pitcou county.

Each province is divided into counties, some have awesome genelaogy sites with lots of free information, others not so much and want payment. Your county genealogy website is awesome and it has tons of information. Here is the website...but be careful you are about to enter into a addiction.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~nspictou/
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

Haggis your town is in Pitcou county, not surprised it is steeped in scottish roots. It is also where my Fraser roots come from. I sure hope the name is not as common as "fraser" this clan was very busy making merry :D and they had a limited slection of naming, John was their favorite, makes for long and difficult sleuthing.

Eureka This village was named after the Eureka Milling Company located near here in Pitcou county.

Each province is divided into counties, some have awesome genelaogy sites with lots of free information, others not so much and want payment. Your county genealogy website is awesome and it has tons of information. Here is the website...but be careful you are about to enter into a addiction.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~nspictou/

Whoa! Thank you, that site is going to effectively end any chance for work today. 8-) There is one unique thing that could help, name-wise... the name Cornelia has been given as a first or second name for the women for years, and there for sure would have been a Cornelia in Pitcou county. Well, at least the name is unusual - maybe not so much in those days, eh - even if it isn't a surname. I think the Morrison/Gair/Randall/Prowse side come from that area, but as you can see, I am not very up on this stuff at all.
 
researchok
#18
OK, have to ask.

Anyone of you Scots have Mclain family ties?

Especially in the south.

Ask and I shall answer.
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by researchok

OK, have to ask.

Anyone of you Scots have Mclain family ties?

Especially in the south.

Ask and I shall answer.

Nah, everybody hates the Mclains. KIDDING! No, I don't have any ties to that clan at all. And indeed, consider yourself asked!
 
American Voice
#20
Photographs are treasured finds. When my Dad's first cousin died, hearing that I was probing the family history, his sister who had the keeping of her grandmother's photograph album gave it to me. There are fifty-three photographs in it, and three tin-types. Only a handful were labelled, and no one had much of a clue what the labels meant. It took a while, but I have identified all but four of the people in the pictures.

One identification was curious. It appears that a great grandfather on my fathers side was well-acquainted with a great great great uncle on my mother's. A photo of Georg Urs Fründ is found in the album of the wife of Henry Geiszler. Georg was brother-in-law to my great great grandfather, Christoph Deubel, who was a stonemason. As it happens, Henry Geiszler was also a stonemason. From records in the Catholic Diocese archives, I know that Christoph participated in the laying of the foundation of Holy Cross Church, in 1846. I wonder if that is how he and young Henry met? I can drive past that church, there on Rich Street, and feel a sense of belonging. Then again, I can stand in the middle of the old section of Mount Calvary Catholic Cemetery, look in every direction, and see the names of ancestors and cousins everywhere. It feels good, to be among the old ones.
 
researchok
#21
The one 'who got away' was a Mclain.

A truly extraordinary woman.

Theres a great story there....
 
peapod
#22
Haggis what have you started here I should be working to, but I keep going back to check this thread. American voice I know what you mean about the photographs, I was lucky enough to find a relative that had a cache of them. Its very strange the effect they have on you. Twenty years ago they would not have had this effect. Researchok you must tell us about the the mclain that got away.
Haggis my fraser uncles do not like the mention of "Campbell" I seem to recall them calling them the "black campbells" do you know the story behind this?
 
Haggis McBagpipe
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by peapod

Haggis what have you started here :D I should be working to, but I keep going back to check this thread. American voice I know what you mean about the photographs, I was lucky enough to find a relative that had a cache of them. Its very strange the effect they have on you. Twenty years ago they would not have had this effect. Researchok you must tell us about the the mclain that got away.
Haggis my fraser uncles do not like the mention of "Campbell" I seem to recall them calling them the "black campbells" do you know the story behind this?

The dreaded Campbell name! I grew up hearing the same thing. The Campbells laid waste to many clans, they were a brutal gang with no respect for other clans, and traitorous to boot. Many of the surnames such as Black, White, Green, and others were taken by the Lamonts and other clans in order to hide from the brutality of the Campbells. I wish I did have more details, but this is recalled from when I was a child, tales my father told me.
 
Numure
#24
Quote:

Pictou County is located on the central north shore of Nova Scotia, Canada. The first settlers arrived from Philadelphia on June 10, 1767 on the brigantine Betsey. In September, 1773 about 200 immigrants arrived from Scotland on the Hector. Much of the culture of the County today can be attributed to these Scottish immigrants.

Many soldiers of the 82nd Hamilton Regiment began settling in Pictou County in the fall of 1783 after peace was made with the United States.

From 1767 to 1849, the great period of British emigration; approximately 120 ships arrived in Pictou County carrying immigrants from Scotland, England and Ireland.


This is grosly ridiculous. They wernt the first settlers. The Acadiens we're(French). They we're there since 1590 or so... But we all know what happen when the British took over....
 
researchok
#25
Numure, I think he was referring to the Scots.

More on the Mclain that got away later, I promise.
 
Numure
#26
That was on the Pitcou website. Pitcou is in Nova Scotia.
 
Diamond Sun
#27
Wow, you all know so much about your family tree. I know virtually nothing. My dad's family hails from Switzerland and my mom's from Scotland and Sweeden. My dad is first generation Canadian, my mom second. Does that make me second and a half?
 
peapod
#28
Diamond sun there is now a database at the national archives which I think is online and you would be able to see what ship they came on, and for the price of photo-copying and postage you would be able to records, just a thought if you are interested.
 
American Voice
#29
Researchok (Rok, for short?), you mention that you live in North Carolina. I remember one of my favorite old radio shows: Fiona Ritchie's "Thistle and Shamrock," produced at WFAE, at UNC Charlotte. The Squirrel Nut Zippers hail from down that way, too.

Anyway, what I wanted to ask: were your family there in NC at the time of the Civil War? A great grandfather of mine was with the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry Regiment. On the morning of September 15, 1862, his brigade were deployed opposite an infantry brigade from North Carolina, at a place called Fox's Gap.
 
researchok
#30
Sorry, AV-- I'm just another Canadian export from Montreal.

I'm in Raleigh now-- really, a beautiful city.

As for local programming, I used to watch the fishing shows-- till I realized they all end in the same way.

They let the fish go.

Took all the mystery out of it.
 

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