The G7's only legal recreational marijuana law is almost ready


mentalfloss
#1
The G7's only legal recreational marijuana law is getting very close to the finish line

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government is sending his legal marijuana law back to the Senate in what are likely the final procedural steps that could see the bill be approved in coming days.

Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould said the government disagrees with more than a dozen amendments to Bill C-45 made by the Senate last week, according to a notice in the House of Commons official agenda for Wednesday. The government accepted two dozen other changes.

Trudeau’s Liberals campaigned three years ago on making Canada the first G-7 nation to legalize the use of recreational marijuana, and the prime minister has pushed for the market to open this summer. However, Conservative senators have slowed passage of the legislation before a summer recess set for June 22, adding to time pressure.

The House of Commons will now vote on Wilson-Raybould’s response, and the government’s majority means it will almost certainly pass. Such votes can be scheduled quickly. The Senate typically can respond in as little as a day or two, so if it drops its push for the changes rejected by the House, the pot law could be signed by the Governor General this week.

It would be rare for senators, who are appointed to the upper house, to halt bills sent from the elected lawmakers in the lower house.

“I don’t think that the Tories actually want to halt it or stop it,” Canopy Growth Corp. Chief Executive Officer Bruce Linton told BNN Bloomberg TV on Friday after the Senate passed the amended bill. “You really don’t win elections by telling 70 per cent of the electorate they are wrong” in their favourable view of a legal market, he said.

Marijuana sales could reach $7.2 billion in 2019 according to a report from Deloitte LLP. Provincial governments, who are in charge of setting up retail stores, have moved ahead with building some retail locations. Federal officials say it could take up to 12 weeks after the law passes for sales to begin.

The G7’s only legal recreational marijuana law is getting very close to the finish line | Financial Post
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#2
A whole shitload of Canadian tourists are going to end up in foreign slammers for thinking that the rest of the world is just as tolerant. Whoops! Death penalty in Singapore for trafficing dope! Oops! The brochure didn't mention that!

Anyway, our embassy and consular staff around the globe are going to be run off their feet trying to save naive Canadians. The really naive ones are about to find out what "zero tolerance" means.
 
petros
+2
#3  Top Rated Post
The impact on the environment is horrendous.

Creating a tropical environment and replacing the sun in Canadian winter is definitely not Green and its going to make exports too pricy.
 
White_Unifier
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

A whole shitload of Canadian tourists are going to end up in foreign slammers for thinking that the rest of the world is just as tolerant. Whoops! Death penalty in Singapore for trafficing dope! Oops! The brochure didn't mention that!

Anyway, our embassy and consular staff around the globe are going to be run off their feet trying to save naive Canadians. The really naive ones are about to find out what "zero tolerance" means.

Singapore probably doesn't want to be executing Canadians on a regular basis either since that could hurt their PR. Singapore might still allow Canadians to visit visa-free, but perhaps with a little more hesitation. Should they start killing off too many Canadians, they might then decide to introduce visitor visas to Canadians as an opportunity to assess whether they're dope-heads or not before they go.

I could see quite a few countries consider that for the same reason which in turn could reduce the value of the Canadian passport.

Thanks, Trudeau.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

Singapore probably doesn't want to be executing Canadians on a regular basis either since that could hurt their PR. Singapore might still allow Canadians to visit visa-free, but perhaps with a little more hesitation. Should they start killing off too many Canadians, they might then decide to introduce visitor visas to Canadians as an opportunity to assess whether they're dope-heads or not before they go.

I could see quite a few countries consider that for the same reason which in turn could reduce the value of the Canadian passport.

Thanks, Trudeau.

I don't believe that they've had any compunction about prosecuting Australians but maybe, they go a bit easier on them. There are some VERY NASTY corners of this Earth who will NOT appreciate Canadians with joints in their luggage.
 
JamesBondo
#6
sadly, the tax revenue that this creates will likely be squandered
 
Hoof Hearted
#7
Buy shares in Doritos!
 
petros
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by JamesBondo View Post

sadly, the tax revenue that this creates will likely be squandered

It'll take 5 years before Govt sees any money.
 
White_Unifier
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by JamesBondo View Post

sadly, the tax revenue that this creates will likely be squandered

It'll go towards lung cancer and addiction treatment, the justice system to deal with more toked drivers, mental-health, policing illegal sales, etc., and it still won't be enough to cover all of the costs.
Last edited by White_Unifier; Jun 19th, 2018 at 06:29 PM..
 
petros
+1
#10
No it won't and there won't be trillions upon trillions. Hell, there won't even be billions.
 
White_Unifier
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

No it won't and there won't be trillions upon trillions. Hell, there won't even be billions.

And that's a common problem. The Government is looking only at how much revenue marijuana sales will bring in, not at how much the expansion of marijuana use will cost in mental and physical health and other cost, let alone subtracting the cost from the revenue to do a cost-benefit analysis.
 
petros
+1
#12
Not in SK, they are looking to keep it cheap so the black market is no longer viable.

There wont be more people using and the health impact is minimal.
 
White_Unifier
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Not in SK, they are looking to keep it cheap so the black market is no longer viable.

There wont be more people using and the health impact is minimal.

Marijuana has around twice as much tar as tobacco, it is mildly addictive (but still addictive), and can impair faculties. Lung cancer, mental health, and accidents.

How can you say use won't increase with easier access?
 
petros
+1
#14
Are people smoking 25 joints a day?

Ever heard of vaping?

How does something that impairs facilities turn a shaking, stumbling, fumbling, stuttering MS patient turn into a steady, walking, talking, person in control of their hands?
 
mentalfloss
#15
What about vaping with the Guess Who in Saskatoon?
 
Jinentonix
No Party Affiliation
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

And that's a common problem. The Government is looking only at how much revenue marijuana sales will bring in, not at how much the expansion of marijuana use will cost in mental and physical health and other cost, let alone subtracting the cost from the revenue to do a cost-benefit analysis.

In over 10 years of legalization in Portugal, the cost savings in health care alone when it came to ODs and other synthetic drug related issues was more than worth it. Legal pot use also saw a decent decline in the use of other drugs.
 
mentalfloss
#17
Senate passes pot bill, paving way for legal cannabis in 8 to 12 weeks