Americans head to Canada to buy cheap insulin, leading to worries about supply


spaminator
#1
Americans head to Canada to buy cheap insulin, leading to worries about supply
Canadian Press
Published:
June 28, 2019
Updated:
June 28, 2019 1:04 PM EDT
Soila Solano prepares to inject herself with insulin at her home in Las Vegas on April 18, 2017. John Locher / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORONTO — The soaring cost of insulin in the United States prompted a group of American diabetics to head to Canada on Friday to buy the non-prescription drug at a fraction of the price.
The group of about 25 left Minneapolis, Minn., for London, Ont., where they also plan to hold a press conference to draw attention to the affordability plight.
One of the organizers, Quinn Nystrom, who is making her second such expedition, said insulin prices south of the border have skyrocketed in two decades.
“One in four Americans are rationing their insulin because they cannot afford it, so people are dying,” Nystrom, 33, said in an interview as she prepared to leave. “It’s a tragedy.”
When she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes 20 years ago, Nystrom said, the price of insulin was around US$16 for a vial. Now it costs US$340 — roughly 10 times the price in Canada.
Nystrom, with the group Minnesota #insulin4all, said Americans can take home a maximum three-month personal supply, but some can only afford a vial or two. One vial of insulin, which helps regulate blood-sugar levels, generally lasts from a few days to a couple of weeks, depending on the patient.
While insulin tourism to Canada is still relatively small scale, it is sparking some concern.
“Any time you have a large population such as the U.S … coming to Canada to access medications that are earmarked for the Canadian market, there’s potential for disruption of some sort,” said Barry Power, a senior director with the Canadian Pharmacists Association. “We see it as a risk that we want to bring to the attention of the federal government.”
Four states including Florida have passed legislation allowing for wholesale or individual imports of medications.
“That’s worrying to us, because if people see it as sanctioned by the U.S. government, then there could be a lot of pressure on Canadian pharmacists and the supply chain,” said Power, a pharmacist in Ottawa.
Health Canada and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration need to put their heads together to start addressing the situation, Power said. Ideally, Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor would talk to her American counterpart to ensure the drug supply in Canada is safeguarded, and manufacturers could do more to limit exports, he said.
Petitpas Taylor had no immediate comment.
Because insulin is non-prescription in Canada, there is no tracking mechanism of how much might be heading south.
“I do not want to be a bad neighbour,” Nystrom said. “I would never come to Canada if there was a drug shortage (and) I do not think going to Canada is a long-term solution. It’s like putting a Band-Aid on a gunshot wound.”
The Minnesota group is planning to visit Banting House in London, where Sir Frederick Banting came up with his idea that led to the discovery of insulin 99 years ago. They plan a news conference on Saturday to raise awareness.
Ironically, Nystrom said, Banting sold his patent for $1 because he believed his discovery belonged to the world and should not be for profit.
“That’s crucial for us to show all Americans: Look at what it’s become in the U.S. It become greed and corruption,” Nystrom said. “It’s gotten out of control with the price, and they increase it every year and we’re held hostage.”
Canada, in line with other industrialized countries, regulates drug prices through the quasi-judicial patented medicine prices review board whose mandate is to prevent gouging. Market forces — essentially whatever people will pay — operate in the U.S.
Expert panel calls for single-payer national pharmacare plan
http://torontosun.com/news/national/...s-about-supply
 
MHz
#2
Isn't it on ebay.ca?? If not why not??
 
taxslave
#3
With that price difference one would think there would be several companies jumping at entering the US market, bring the price down.
 
Hoid
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

With that price difference one would think there would be several companies jumping at entering the US market, bring the price down.

because the high price of drugs in America is due to supply constraints?

grow the **** up.
 
MHz
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

With that price difference one would think there would be several companies jumping at entering the US market, bring the price down.

HAHAHAHAHA Stupid score of 11teenhundred. A new record folks. Hahahaha.

 
Dixie Cup
+3
#6  Top Rated Post
That is truly disgusting as the pharmaceutical companies can't say the high price is due to R&D! What does one do? What the gov't needs to do is get rid of all the lobbyists.
 
MHz
#7
Why would they take away their own 'bonus money'? The cleanup is in the hands of the ones they abuse the most. Don't expect that revolt to happen. Their downfall will come from the inside, just like any successful coup it has the Military as their main supporter. Rock against paper, who wins every time?
 
Danbones
#8
The bullet, bandaid, and tombstone sellers.

oh...and the faknews war side commentators.

All part of the same business model as the gangs and the cartels.
 
spaminator
#9
Bernie Sanders plans trip to Canada with group seeking cheaper insulin
Canadian Press
Published:
July 11, 2019
Updated:
July 11, 2019 4:18 PM EDT
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks to the media after the second night of the first Democratic presidential debate on June 27, 2019 in Miami.Cliff Hawkins / Getty Images
TORONTO — American presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders said on Thursday that he would soon be coming to Canada with a group of diabetics to buy cheaper insulin.
The Vermont senator said in a tweet that he planned to make the trip toward the end of this month.
Typically, a vial of insulin Type 1 diabetics need to regulate their blood sugar costs about US$340 in the United States, roughly 10 times the price in Canada.
“We can’t wait for drug companies to lower prices,” Sanders tweeted on Thursday. “Americans need relief now!”
Sanders, who has long targeted pharmaceutical companies for the cost of prescription drugs, made a similar medication trip to Canada in 1999. He has accused the industry of being antithetical to the interests of the American public.
“In 1999, I took working-class women, struggling with breast cancer, to Canada to buy the same medication for 1/10th of the price they were paying in the U.S.,” Sanders tweeted.
The Democratic presidential candidate’s campaign did not immediately respond to a request to discuss the trip.
According to CNN, Sanders and the diabetics will make the trip as part of his efforts to highlight the hardships some Americans face when it comes to drug purchases. The plan is to head to Windsor, Ont., from Detroit.
Late last month, a group of Type 1 diabetics from Minnesota crossed the border to buy insulin in London, Ont. One of the organizers, Quinn Nystrom, who was making her second such expedition, said insulin prices south of the border have skyrocketed in two decades.
“One in four Americans are rationing their insulin because they cannot afford it, so people are dying,” Nystrom, 33, said in a recent interview.
Current rules allow Americans to take home a maximum three-month personal supply of medicines bought in Canada, and four states — Florida among them — have passed legislation allowing for wholesale or individual imports of medications. Because insulin is non-prescription in Canada, there is no tracking mechanism of how much might be heading south.
Although still relatively small-scale, the drug tourism has sparked concerns in Canada.
Barry Power, a senior director with the Canadian Pharmacists Association, has warned of potential disruption if large numbers of Americans flood the Canadian market and called on the Canadian government to look at the issue. A spokeswoman for the federal health minister said the government was monitoring the situation.
Canada, in line with other industrialized countries, regulates drug prices through the quasi-judicial patented medicine prices review board whose mandate is to prevent gouging. Market forces operate in the U.S.
In an interview with CNN on Thursday, Sanders attributed the rising cost of drugs in the United States and the disparity with prices in Canada to the difference between the health-care systems in the two countries.
“Canada has a nationalized, single-payer system that allows them to negotiate much better prices with the drug companies,” Sanders said. “In our country it is a much different story.”
http://lfpress.com/news/local-news/c...don-birthplace
http://cnn.com/2019/07/11/politics/b...cription-drugs
http://torontosun.com/news/world/ber...heaper-insulin
 
petros
+2
#10
Insulin is free in the US from drug manufacturers if you are financially marginalized.

Apply for assistance
You may qualify for the federal government’s Extra Help program, for your state health insurance assistance program, for one of the new insulin assistance programs offered by drug companies or for other help from groups like NeedyMeds, The Partnership for Prescription Assistance.

In addition, Rx Assist; Rx Hope; and for seniors, BenefitsCheckUp can help you find assistance programs. Insulin makers are also doing more to help people get the insulin they need.

Learn more at:

Eli Lilly
Novo Nordisk
Sanofi
 
Danbones
#11
U.S. insulin costs per patient nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016: study

(Reuters) - The cost of insulin for treating type 1 diabetes in the United States nearly doubled over a five-year period, underscoring a national outcry over rising drug prices, according to a new analysis shared with Reuters.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-u...-idUSKCN1PG136




Last month, the powerful Senate Finance Committee asked the three dominant insulin makers detailed questions about the drugs' price increases. The price for one vial of Eli Lilly's Humalog surged from $35 in 2001 to $234 in 2015. From 2013 to this year, Novo Nordisk's Novolog jumped from $289 to $540 and Sanofi’s Lantus from $244 to $431, according to a committee letter.
https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/ne...se/3196757002/

enron strikes again
Last edited by Danbones; 1 week ago at 08:11 AM..
 
petros
#12
$25 an Rx at WalMart

A vial of Novolin ReliOn Insulin N cost $24.88 at WalMart when this story was written in late 2018.

https://www.ontrackdiabetes.com/live...your-prescript
 
DaSleeper
#13
It's a conspiracy.....I keed you not!
 
spilledthebeer
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Isn't it on ebay.ca?? If not why not??






IDIOT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!


Drug companies want their PROFITS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!


They dont mind selling small quantities to the modest sized Cdn market!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


But if huge numbers of Yankees come here.....................................


buying up LARGE QUANTITIES of drugs...............................


it will make a mess for everybody!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!


Only a loon would buy generic drugs off the internet!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


AND DONT TELL ME...........................................


let me guess........................................


MHz gets his LSD OFF THE INTERNET...............................


which explains a LOT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!
 

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