Cancel Culture


Tecumsehsbones
#31
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

You are correct. Prejudice, bigotry and racism are not one in the same.

Depends on how one is using the term.

Funny thing about English. If you use the OED definition of each word, not much that gets said or written makes sense.
 
Girth
+2
#32
Cancel culture is coming for the Duke.




They ahve gone too far!
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#33
I opposed taking Woodrow Wilson’s name off our school. Here’s why I changed my mind.

Opinion by Christopher L. Eisgruber
June 27, 2020

Christopher L. Eisgruber is president of Princeton University.


The Princeton University Board of Trustees voted on Friday to remove Woodrow Wilson’s name from the university’s School of Public and International Affairs. It acted because Wilson’s racist opinions and policies make him an inappropriate namesake for a school whose scholars, students and alumni must stand firmly against racism and for equality and justice.

For my university, the decision was momentous. Wilson was an undergraduate alumnus of Princeton, a distinguished professor on its faculty and eventually its 13th president. He transformed the place from a sleepy college to a world-class research university.

During his eight-year term, he increased the size of the faculty by half and introduced curricular reforms that persist to this day. When Wilson tried to reform the university’s social clubs, the trustees fired him because his ideas were too progressive.

Wilson went on to become governor of New Jersey, president of the United States and a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. For decades, the university has celebrated Wilson’s record of public service and his achievements.

Wilson was also a racist. He discouraged black applicants from applying to Princeton. While president of the United States, Wilson segregated the previously integrated federal civil service, thereby moving the United States backward in its quest for racial justice and contributing to the systemic racism that continues to damage black lives and our country today.

On the Princeton campus, Wilson’s name was everywhere: on the prestigious School of Public and International Affairs, a residential college and the university’s highest award for undergraduate alumni. The first part of the university’s informal motto, “Princeton in the nation’s service,” was drawn from a Wilson speech.

In November 2015, student activists occupied my office, demanding, among other things, that Wilson’s name be removed from the school. At my request, the Board of Trustees formed a committee to consider the issue. After careful deliberation, consultation with leading scholars and engagement with the broad university community, the committee eventually recommended reforms to make Princeton more inclusive and to recount its history, including Wilson’s racism, more honestly.

The committee and the board, however, left Wilson’s name on the public policy school and the residential college. Until this month, I strongly agreed with that decision.

Wilson’s genuine achievements, I thought, gave Princeton sound reasons to honor him. He is a far different figure than John C. Calhoun or Robert E. Lee, people whose pro-slavery commitments defined their careers and who were sometimes honored for the purpose of supporting segregation or racism. Princeton honored Wilson without regard to, and perhaps even in ignorance of, his racism.

And that, I now believe, is precisely the problem. Princeton is part of an America that has too often disregarded, ignored and turned a blind eye to racism, allowing the persistence of systems that discriminate against black people. When Derek Chauvin knelt for nearly nine minutes on George Floyd’s neck while bystanders recorded his cruelty, he might have assumed that the system would disregard, ignore or excuse his conduct, as it had done in response to past complaints against him.

This searing moment in our national history should make clear to all of us our urgent responsibility to stand firmly against racism and for the integrity and value of black lives. That is why the Board of Trustees, on my recommendation, removed Wilson’s name from what will now be known as the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs.

When a university names its public policy school for a political leader, it inevitably offers the honoree as a role model for its students. However grand some of Wilson’s achievements may have been, his racism disqualifies him from that role.

To some, this decision will seem obvious and overdue. To others, it will seem an excess of political correctness, an unjust judgment upon a man from another era.

For me, the decision was wrenching but right. Wilson helped to create the university that I love. I do not pretend to know how to evaluate his life or his staggering combination of achievement and failure. I do know, however, that we cannot disregard or ignore racism when deciding whom we hold up to our students as heroes or role models. This is not the only step our university will be taking to confront the realities and legacies of racism, but it is an important one. Our commitment to eliminate racism must be unequivocal, and that is why we removed the name of Princeton’s modern-day founder from its School of Public and International Affairs.
 
pgs
#34
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

I opposed taking Woodrow Wilson’s name off our school. Here’s why I changed my mind.

Opinion by Christopher L. Eisgruber
June 27, 2020

Christopher L. Eisgruber is president of Princeton University.


The Princeton University Board of Trustees voted on Friday to remove Woodrow Wilson’s name from the university’s School of Public and International Affairs. It acted because Wilson’s racist opinions and policies make him an inappropriate namesake for a school whose scholars, students and alumni must stand firmly against racism and for equality and justice.

For my university, the decision was momentous. Wilson was an undergraduate alumnus of Princeton, a distinguished professor on its faculty and eventually its 13th president. He transformed the place from a sleepy college to a world-class research university.

During his eight-year term, he increased the size of the faculty by half and introduced curricular reforms that persist to this day. When Wilson tried to reform the university’s social clubs, the trustees fired him because his ideas were too progressive.

Wilson went on to become governor of New Jersey, president of the United States and a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. For decades, the university has celebrated Wilson’s record of public service and his achievements.

Wilson was also a racist. He discouraged black applicants from applying to Princeton. While president of the United States, Wilson segregated the previously integrated federal civil service, thereby moving the United States backward in its quest for racial justice and contributing to the systemic racism that continues to damage black lives and our country today.

On the Princeton campus, Wilson’s name was everywhere: on the prestigious School of Public and International Affairs, a residential college and the university’s highest award for undergraduate alumni. The first part of the university’s informal motto, “Princeton in the nation’s service,” was drawn from a Wilson speech.

In November 2015, student activists occupied my office, demanding, among other things, that Wilson’s name be removed from the school. At my request, the Board of Trustees formed a committee to consider the issue. After careful deliberation, consultation with leading scholars and engagement with the broad university community, the committee eventually recommended reforms to make Princeton more inclusive and to recount its history, including Wilson’s racism, more honestly.

The committee and the board, however, left Wilson’s name on the public policy school and the residential college. Until this month, I strongly agreed with that decision.

Wilson’s genuine achievements, I thought, gave Princeton sound reasons to honor him. He is a far different figure than John C. Calhoun or Robert E. Lee, people whose pro-slavery commitments defined their careers and who were sometimes honored for the purpose of supporting segregation or racism. Princeton honored Wilson without regard to, and perhaps even in ignorance of, his racism.

And that, I now believe, is precisely the problem. Princeton is part of an America that has too often disregarded, ignored and turned a blind eye to racism, allowing the persistence of systems that discriminate against black people. When Derek Chauvin knelt for nearly nine minutes on George Floyd’s neck while bystanders recorded his cruelty, he might have assumed that the system would disregard, ignore or excuse his conduct, as it had done in response to past complaints against him.

This searing moment in our national history should make clear to all of us our urgent responsibility to stand firmly against racism and for the integrity and value of black lives. That is why the Board of Trustees, on my recommendation, removed Wilson’s name from what will now be known as the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs.

When a university names its public policy school for a political leader, it inevitably offers the honoree as a role model for its students. However grand some of Wilson’s achievements may have been, his racism disqualifies him from that role.

To some, this decision will seem obvious and overdue. To others, it will seem an excess of political correctness, an unjust judgment upon a man from another era.

For me, the decision was wrenching but right. Wilson helped to create the university that I love. I do not pretend to know how to evaluate his life or his staggering combination of achievement and failure. I do know, however, that we cannot disregard or ignore racism when deciding whom we hold up to our students as heroes or role models. This is not the only step our university will be taking to confront the realities and legacies of racism, but it is an important one. Our commitment to eliminate racism must be unequivocal, and that is why we removed the name of Princeton’s modern-day founder from its School of Public and International Affairs.

Everyone has an opinion and that is his . Doesnít make him right , or wrong for that matter .
 
Jinentonix
+4
#35
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Of course not. There is no racism.

Except anti-White racism.

Wrong again kemosabe. There's just no anti-White racism. Here's Canada's BLM founder expressing her feelings.
Quote:

“Plz Allah give me strength to not cuss/kill these men and white folks out here today.”

Quote:

Whiteness is not humxness,” the statement begins. “infact, white skin is sub-humxn.” The post goes on to present a genetics-based argument centred on melanin and enzyme.

Sound familiar?



Quote:

White ppl are recessive genetic defects. this is factual,” the post reads towards the end.

Sound familiar again? "Sub-human" or as your nazi buddies like to call it, the untermenschen. Blaming all your ills on one group of people is just SOOOO 1930's Germany.
 
gerryh
#36
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Wrong again kemosabe. There's just no anti-White racism. Here's Canada's BLM founder expressing her feelings.
Sound familiar?
Sound familiar again? "Sub-human" or as your nazi buddies like to call it, the untermenschen. Blaming all your ills on one group of people is just SOOOO 1930's Germany.

Do you have a link to this?
 
Girth
+3
#37
I see the protesters want Lincoln statues removed. Nothing says supporting the BLM movement like toppling down a statue of the man who made it possible for your people to enjoy the right to be free from slavery.


https://www.wbur.org/news/2020/06/25...ests-boston-dc
 
spilledthebeer
+1
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Depends on how one is using the term.

Funny thing about English. If you use the OED definition of each word, not much that gets said or written makes sense.




Oh T-bonesforbrains! You EPITOMIZE all that is WRONG with modern LIE-beral language skills!


That you are DELIBERATELY OBTUSE and provocative IS ON YOU!


Not on the language!


Abnd YOU STILL HAVE NOT SHARED WITH US your alleged wisdom regarding what new training



that YOU CLAIM COPS NEED!


You blew that HORN SO HARD till I started asking simple questions!


That YOU CANNOT ANSWER!


But at least you have stopped commenting on yourmasturbation - that is a PLUS!
 
B00Mer
+2
#39
Never Take a knee to the Democrat mob.


Unless it's right in their groin..
 
B00Mer
#40
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Everyone has an opinion and that is his . Doesnít make him right , or wrong for that matter .

Opinions are like Assholes, everyone has one.. and yours stinks
 
Jinentonix
+5
#41
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryh View Post

Do you have a link to this?

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/james-..._14635896.html


https://torontosun.com/2017/02/11/bl...8-decfe73d1e52


Ironically, in 2018 she was awarded the Pam McConnell Award for Young Women in Leadership and good ol' John Tory was at the ceremony like the good little leftist dipshit he is, not minding in the least that the stupid, racist c*nt called him subhuman.
 
petros
+3
#42
It's okay, every face is known, every conversation they have is recorded and all their data use and texts compiled leading to more and more deadbeats who aided or conspired.

They think they're free.

LMFAO
 
spilledthebeer
#43
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Wrong again kemosabe. There's just no anti-White racism. Here's Canada's BLM founder expressing her feelings.
Sound familiar?



Sound familiar again? "Sub-human" or as your nazi buddies like to call it, the untermenschen. Blaming all your ills on one group of people is just SOOOO 1930's Germany.






POOR FOOLISH Jinentonix! He opens up a can of worms and then stupidly EATS THEM!


Our very own TVO/The Agenda actually played a clip explaining that many black people in North America are deficient in Vitamin D!


And that such a deficiency can affect emotional response and logic centres of the brain!


ALL humans absorb some Vitamin D from the Sunlight and of course Black people are geared to living in a VERY SUNNY CLIMATE!


Thus black people apparently often DO NOT ABSORB enough Vitamin D in our colder northern climates - especially when all



dressed up in winter clothing that protects the skin from cold - AND from weak winter SUN!



Oddly - the TVO documentary CAREFULLY AVOIDED SUGGESTING THAT THIS FINDING MIGHT EXPLAIN A GREAT DEAL


about the NUTBARS at Antifa! One has to wonder if we could largely eliminate Antifa simply by feeding people VITAMINS?






However the Psychology Today Journal tells us THIS about Vitamin D deficiency and mental illness!









Psychological Consequences of Vitamin D Deficiency

Vitamin D supplementation may help alleviate depression.

Posted Nov 14, 2011
Chances are you are not getting enough vitamin D.
An estimated 1 billion people worldwide have vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency. Individuals at high risk for vitamin D deficiency include those living far from the equator, those with conditions such as obesity, liver disease, celiac, and renal disease, the elderly, and those with darker skin.
Findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which included more than 15,000 adults, indicated that individuals with darker skin have lower vitamin D levels. Dark-skinned individuals' high level of melanin impairs absorption of vitamin D, which is made when skin is exposed to ultraviolet radiation found in natural sunlight.
Regardless of cause, deficiency of vitamin D has significant medical and psychological consequences. Every tissue in the body has vitamin D receptors, including the brain, heart, muscles, and immune system, which means vitamin D is needed at every level for the body to function.
Vitamin D is also the only vitamin that is a hormone. After it is consumed in the diet or absorbed (synthesized) in the skin, vitamin D is transported to the liver and kidneys where it is converted to its active hormone form. Vitamin D as a hormone assists with the absorption of calcium, helping to build strong bones, teeth and muscles.




NOTE::::In addition to its well-known role in calcium absorption, vitamin D activates genes that regulate the immune system and release neurotransmitters (e.g., dopamine, serotonin) that affect brain function and development. Researchers have found vitamin D receptors on a handful of cells located in regions in the brain-the same regions that are linked with depression.




NOTE: Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), a mood disorder featuring depressive symptoms, occurs during the dark times of the year when there is relatively little sunshine, coinciding with the sudden drop in vitamin D levels in the body. Several studies have suggested that the symptoms of SAD may be due to changing levels of vitamin D3, which may affect serotonin levels in the brain.


Due to vitamin D's connection to depression and mood, I test the vitamin D levels, specifically 25-hydroxy-vitamin D, of every new patient. For years, vitamin D blood levels of 20 ng/mL were accepted as normal. Many researchers and clinicians now consider this too low. More recently, the new normal level is anything greater than 30 ng/mL. However, I prefer to see 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels between 50 and 75 ng/mL. For those who are low, I recommend a supplement that may range from 2,000 IU to 10,000 IU. It's important to note that vitamin D supplementation needs to be monitored by blood testing every few months.
Although vitamin D supplementation may improve mood, vitamin D is only a small, but critical, part of treatment; depression has myriad causes. However, in my experience, vitamin D deficiency impairs and prolongs recovery from depression.
Various studies confirm the link between low vitamin D and mental illness. These studies provide evidence that optimizing vitamin D levels may improve positive psychological well-being:



AND THIS From "Diabetes Journals.org





The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes is disproportionately elevated in African Americans compared to other ethnic groups in the United States. Despite recent advances in diabetes treatment and management, the most significant escalation in incidence of type 2 diabetes has been in this group. Some studies suggest a possible role for vitamin D deficiency in the development of type 2 diabetes and that insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity are reduced when vitamin D levels are deficient.
Obesity, hyperglycemia, cardiovascular disease, and minority race are common among people with type 2 diabetes and vitamin D deficiency. These phenomena are known precursors to the development of type 2 diabetes and exacerbate the risk for complications where diabetes exists. Poverty, urban living settings, and lactose intolerance are also common among African Americans. These conditions promote opportunities for vitamin D deficiency to manifest and attenuate opportunities for participation in health-promoting behaviors by those affected. The common traits between vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes merit careful attention.
 
Jinentonix
+3
#44
I think our alphabet may be under attack next. You see, the lower case "t" looks an awful lot like the crosses the KKK were so fond of burning. Clearly the letter "t" is a hate symbol.
 
petros
+3
#45
I'm cancelling all my charitable contributions.

Non-profits are being used to steer society down the path of their billionaire backers choosing.
 
spilledthebeer
+1
#46
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Everyone has an opinion and that is his . Doesnít make him right , or wrong for that matter .






Actually IT DOES offer up opportunities to be right or wrong!


Would you accept that Adolf Hitler was right about much of anything?


How about Ghengis Khan? Just because HE COULD terrorize the ancient world - does that mean he should have been permitted?



Did Friedrich Nieztche nail it when he suggested that the STRONG AND WISE MAN HAD LESS MORAL RESPONSIBILITY


to society than the small and weak man?


Value judgements are all around you and we ALL MAKE value judgements on moral issues!


UNLESS WE ARE LIE-berals! Then - if we are LIE-berals - we PRETEND NOT to make value judgements - while ACTIVELY



and diligently seeking out those value judgements that we CAN MOST QUICKLY PROFIT FROM!
 
Girth
#47


Native Americans want Mount Rushmore to come down immediately.
 
Girth
#48
Word out of Washington, is the NFL Redskins will change their name by the end of the month, and this may be their new logo:

 
Dixie Cup
+3
#49
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

I think our alphabet may be under attack next. You see, the lower case "t" looks an awful lot like the crosses the KKK were so fond of burning. Clearly the letter "t" is a hate symbol.


If it isn't now, it will be - you've just given them the idea. Wonder how long it will take them to actually act on it?
 
B00Mer
+2
#50
I wear it every day or my MEGA hat just to offend Liberals

 
captain morgan
+4
#51
Quote: Originally Posted by Tygerbright View Post

Yeah anti-white attitudes are prejudices. Racism has a culturally ingrained systemic series of components.

If only there was some kind of gvt mandated program to provide preferential treatment for those demographics that are so cruelly subjected to prejudice and racism like a kinda Affirmative Action thingy or such


Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

I opposed taking Woodrow Wilsonís name off our school. Hereís why I changed my mind.


Gonna be interesting to observe what these kind of actions relative to Alumni contributions to the school and scholarship programs.

I wonder who will really pay the price in the end?


Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Wrong again kemosabe. There's just no anti-White racism. Here's Canada's BLM founder expressing her feelings.
Sound familiar?

Sound familiar again? "Sub-human" or as your nazi buddies like to call it, the untermenschen. Blaming all your ills on one group of people is just SOOOO 1930's Germany.


Genocide isn't technically racism, so it's OK
 
Walter
+2
#52
Ad in New York Times Calls for Yale to Be Renamed After Jeremiah Dummer
https://amgreatness.com/2020/07/02/a...remiah-dummer/

Brilliant.
 
Girth
#53
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Ad in New York Times Calls for Yale to Be Renamed After Jeremiah Dummer
https://amgreatness.com/2020/07/02/a...remiah-dummer/
Brilliant.

Why not Jeremiah Springfield? He fought a bear.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#54
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

If only there was some kind of gvt mandated program to provide preferential treatment for those demographics that are so cruelly subjected to prejudice and racism like a kinda Affirmative Action thingy or such

The funny part is you don't even know what affirmative action is. You read something somewhere, and so your certainty is matched only by your error. You actually think it's a quota programme.


Quote:

Gonna be interesting to observe what these kind of actions relative to Alumni contributions to the school and scholarship programs.
I wonder who will really pay the price in the end?

Betcha the effect is microscopic. But I like your idea of settling all debates by adding up the money.
 
taxslave
+1
#55
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

The funny part is you don't even know what affirmative action is. You read something somewhere, and so your certainty is matched only by your error. You actually think it's a quota programme.
Betcha the effect is microscopic. But I like your idea of settling all debates by adding up the money.

In Canada it is a quota program. Only they have a more PC name for it but the Federal government expects their workforce to mirror the general population.
 
taxslave
+1
#56
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Ad in New York Times Calls for Yale to Be Renamed After Jeremiah Dummer
https://amgreatness.com/2020/07/02/a...remiah-dummer/
Brilliant.

You spelled dumber wrong.
 
captain morgan
+3
#57
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

The funny part is you don't even know what affirmative action is. You read something somewhere, and so your certainty is matched only by your error. You actually think it's a quota programme.

Refrain from making any assumptions of what I might think, hell, you can't put a cogent argument together as is so attempting to speak on behalf of another is about as useful as teats on a bull.

That said, the tragedy in views like yours is that you get all caught up in the minutiae that results in missing the big picture entirely.

Fact is, any/all programs that promote a preferred positioning of any defined demographic is, by definition, discriminatory... Ironic that the solution to discrimination is to fix it with discrimination... I hope that wee bit of perspective doesn't offend your sensibilities re: equality

PS - affirmative action in many regions has a foundation in a quota based system.


Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Betcha the effect is microscopic. But I like your idea of settling all debates by adding up the money.


We'll be finding out soon enough, but thanks for the speculation all the same
 
Tecumsehsbones
-1
#58
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Fact is, any/all programs that promote a preferred positioning of any defined demographic is, by definition, discriminatory... Ironic that the solution to discrimination is to fix it with discrimination... I hope that wee bit of perspective doesn't offend your sensibilities re: equality

Not a bit. I agree.

Poor you. Poor, poor you. The White Man's Burden getting you down?
 
captain morgan
+2
#59
Love it!

No argument left so all that remains is to attack the messenger
 
Tecumsehsbones
#60
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Love it!
No argument left so all that remains is to attack the messenger

We have no argument. How many times to I have to rail against "positive" discrimination for y'all to get that I hate "positive" discrimination?

A body'd almost think y'all'd get it by now. Maybe expected too much of y'all.

After all, somebody who equates objecting to the one-sided lionization of racists with affirmative action ain't thinking real clearly.
 

Similar Threads

10
Cancel Telus .ca
by Walter | Oct 8th, 2016