Police Respond to Black Lives Matter


Tecumsehsbones
#31
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Out of all cops shootings so far this year only 17% of those who were shot were black.

What a travesty.

Maybe in Canada. In the U.S. it's 24%.
 
Cliffy
#32


Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Maybe in Canada. In the U.S. it's 24%.

What percentage of the population are black?
 
Tecumsehsbones
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by cliffy View Post




what percentage of the population are black?

12 1/2 - 13.
 
Cliffy
#34
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

12 1/2 - 13.

Then it is a disproportionate number being killed. Same in Canada.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#35
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Then it is a disproportionate number being killed. Same in Canada.

Ya think?
 
Locutus
#36
tragic
 
Curious Cdn
#37
"Forget it, Jake. It's America."
 
Ludlow
#38
Quit beatin it into the ground. You ain't doin nobody no good. ~ Paul Newman from the movie " Cool Hand Luke "
 
Remington1
#39
What about Toronto killings; " Black Life Matter here seem to be quite aggressive. Does anybody have statistics about Canadian cops murdering Blacks? It must be bad if we are being compared to the US; preventing our Mayor and cops to take part in parades!! One thing for sure, the hatred does not stop with cops/ Mayor, appears to be all white people, browns seem to be accepted okay, thank God. Prejudices is indeed an ugly character flaw, and unfortunately, the TO chapter of "Black Lives Matter" is very very prejudice. The truth might hurt, but it is however still the truth. I say provide numbers or shut up.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#40
Quote: Originally Posted by Remington1 View Post

What about Toronto killings; " Black Life Matter here seem to be quite aggressive. Does anybody have statistics about Canadian cops murdering Blacks? It must be bad if we are being compared to the US; preventing our Mayor and cops to take part in parades!! One thing for sure, the hatred does not stop with cops/ Mayor, appears to be all white people, browns seem to be accepted okay, thank God. Prejudices is indeed an ugly character flaw, and unfortunately, the TO chapter of "Black Lives Matter" is very very prejudice. The truth might hurt, but it is however still the truth. I say provide numbers or shut up.

All of those Toronto killings ... how many are they? The murder rate in Regina, Saskatoon, Winnipeg are times higher than they are in Toronto

I suppose that Sammy Yatim qualifies as coloured if you stretch the definition to include Arabs.
 
HarperCons
+1
#41
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

There are fake problems (like worrying about terrorism) and then there are real problems in America.


This is one of the real ones.

Racism is indeed endemic in Amerikkka and the police are a terrorist racist organization.
 
Ludlow
#42
Quote: Originally Posted by HarperCons View Post

Racism is indeed endemic in Amerikkka and the police are a terrorist racist organization.

A truly ignorant statement from an ignoramus.
 
petros
#43
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Maybe in Canada. In the U.S. it's 24%.

That is a US stat.
 
Curious Cdn
#44
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Out of all cops shootings so far this year only 17% of those who were shot were black.

What a travesty.

Maybe, they should extend the season.
 
Cliffy
#45
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Maybe, they should extend the season.

Only 2.5% of Canadians are black. 17% of police shootings are of black people. That is even worse than in the US.
 
petros
#46
17% is the US number.
 
gopher
+1
#47
Quote: Originally Posted by Locutus View Post

tragic



murder - even some local conservatives are pissed off at the fcukkin cops for this one
 
Locutus
#48
No biggie, says mainstream media...


...we'll turn Lavish and Philando into Bonnie and Clyde...
Police sources have confirmed that investigators have linked the cigarette tax stamps from a July 2nd (armed) robbery to the vehicle driven by Philando Castile and Lavish Reynolds.
Okay, BLM... you're up. Make it good, bro .

halls of macadamia: No biggie, says mainstream media...
 
spaminator
#49
Records show Minnesota officer in Philando Castile shooting had 2011 interaction with him
Doug Glass, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
First posted: Friday, July 22, 2016 01:55 PM EDT | Updated: Friday, July 22, 2016 03:42 PM EDT
MINNEAPOLIS -- A Minnesota police officer and the black motorist he shot to death during a traffic stop had interacted in a previous stop more than four years earlier, newly released records show.
Philando Castile, 32, died July 6 after he was pulled over by St. Anthony Police Officer Jeronimo Yanez in suburban St. Paul. Yanez's attorney has said the officer was reacting to seeing a gun. Castile's girlfriend, who streamed the aftermath of the shooting live on Facebook, said Castile was shot while reaching for his ID after telling the officer he had a gun permit and was armed.
Records released Thursday by the city of St. Anthony in response to a request from The Associated Press also include a report on a July 2 armed robbery at a Super USA convenience store that lists Yanez as one of two officers assigned to investigate. The robbery occurred a few blocks away from where the traffic stop took place four days later.
Yanez's attorney, Thomas Kelly, has said that when Yanez stopped Castile he was approaching someone he thought resembled a suspect in an armed robbery.
Castile's family has questioned that, saying his long history of traffic stops -- pulled over or ticketed at least 52 times in recent years -- suggested he was racially profiled.
The traffic stop included in Thursday's release was made in November 2011, with Castile pulled over for a defective brake light. He was arrested on a Hennepin County warrant for driving with a revoked license.
Yanez wasn't the arresting officer, but he was listed as one of two officers who drove Castile several miles to the county jail. It was just a few weeks after Yanez had joined the St. Anthony Police Department.
Yanez's attorney didn't respond to an email from AP.
The city also partially responded to a request for personnel data on Yanez and Officer Joseph Kauser, who also responded to the scene of Castile's shooting. The city said it had no record of complaints against either officer. Yanez joined the department in November 2011, and Kauser in January 2013.
The St. Anthony Police Department currently has 23 police officers and 14 reserve officers.
Records show Minnesota officer in Philando Castile shooting had 2011 interaction
 
spaminator
#50
Cop who shot man whose death was livestreamed charged
Kyle Potter and Amy Forliti, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
First posted: Wednesday, November 16, 2016 12:16 PM EST | Updated: Wednesday, November 16, 2016 12:20 PM EST
ST. PAUL, Minn. — A Minnesota police officer has been charged with second-degree manslaughter in the killing of a black man in a St. Paul suburb.
Prosecutors announced the charge against St. Anthony police officer Jeronimo Yanez on Wednesday.
Yanez fatally shot 32-year-old Philando Castile during a July 6 traffic stop in Falcon Heights. The shooting’s gruesome aftermath was streamed live on Facebook by Castile’s girlfriend, who was with him. She said Castile was shot while reaching for his ID after telling Yanez he had a gun permit and was armed.
Yanez is Latino. Castile was black.
Family members claim Castile was racially profiled. Yanez’s attorney has said the officer made the stop because Castile looked like a possible match for an armed robbery suspect, and Yanez reacted to the presence of a gun.
Cop who shot man whose death was livestreamed charged | World | News | Toronto S
 
Tecumsehsbones
#51
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

Family members claim Castile was racially profiled. Yanez’s attorney has said the officer made the stop because Castile looked like a possible match for an armed robbery suspect, and Yanez reacted to the presence of a gun.
Cop who shot man whose death was livestreamed charged | World | News | Toronto S

A legal, properly permitted gun that the cop was told about and never saw.
 
tay
#52
The Police Officer Who Killed Philando Castile Is Found Not Guilty

Even a liberal enclave like the one Castile lived in, even having a licensed gun, like Castile had, cannot bring worth to a black man’s life in the eyes of our racist justice system.


When we got to the governor’s house, on Summit Avenue in St. Paul, Minnesota, a hot rain exploded onto the protesters, the kind that offers no relief, no break in the weather, just an even worse humidity, if that’s possible in a Minnesota summer. I had walked along the protesters for a short distance, a block or two, from the elementary school where Philando Castile worked serving lunch to kids, to the governor’s house. At the front of the protest was Castile’s family and his girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds, crying as she held up a “Black Lives Matter” t-shirt—Reynolds, along with her 4-year-old daughter, witnessed a police officer shoot and kill Castile in his car after he announced to the officer that he had a licensed gun in the glove compartment

The protest was unlike any other I’d covered. It was truly diverse. There were so many residents of St. Paul’s black community there; the Castiles, a childhood friend told me, were “a big family” in St. Paul. And there were lots of people from his school, colleagues who attested to his warm and friendly character. He was one of those “perfect negroes,” I thought to myself, one of the ones you can’t mess up with a flimsy story about how he sold loose cigarettes, like Eric Garner was. “There probably wasn’t even a story raising questions about him stealing a cigarillo,” I thought to myself, sickly hopeful. Since all human beings are fallible, “perfect negroes” are an impossibility, but I thought, because I was desperate, that Philando Castile might be one. The only time I held out hope that there might be consequences for the police following the shooting death of a black American was for Tamir Rice, a child so young that to create a myth around him being a big, bad miscreant would be impossible. I was wrong there. And I’m wrong here.

The “perfect negro,” a description so unfair it’s absurd, doesn’t work. The not-guilty verdict, returned after an initial deadlocked jury and after more than 25 hours of deliberation, proves that even a liberal enclave like the one Castile worked in and lived in, that having a licensed gun, like the one Castile had, that having a 4-year-old girl in the back of the vehicle he was operating, cannot bring worth to a black man’s life in the eyes of a cruelly racist justice system. [...]

https://www.thenation.com/article/po...nd-not-guilty/
 
Danbones
#53
Riiiight, a criminal with a licensed gun!
lol!
Never happen unless he is elected to something!
 
tay
#54
There Is No Justice In America For Black People Killed By Cops

“The system continues to fail black people.”

On Friday, St. Anthony police Officer Jeronimo Yanez was found not guilty in Castile’s death.

In audio recording from just before the encounter, Yanez can be heard saying: “I’m going to stop a car. I’m going to check IDs. I have reason to pull it over. The two occupants just look like people that were involved in a robbery.”

“The driver looks more like one of our suspects, just ’cause of the wide-set nose,” Yanez continues. He later confirmed that he believed Castile matched the description of a suspect, something cops often say about black men.

Yanez pulled the car over. Things escalated. Yanez shot seven times into the vehicle. He thought Castile was reaching for his weapon, a gun that Castile was licensed to carry and that he had informed the officer about moments before. Castile’s girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds, says he was reaching for his wallet. She began filming on her phone . The resulting video, with Castile bleeding to death on camera as Reynolds calmly complies with the officer’s screamed instructions, is impossible to forget.

The officer was placed on leave. The officer was charged. And now, nearly a year later, the officer is acquitted and goes home to his family, unlike his victim.

It’s almost textbook.


https://twitter.com/hashtag/PhilandoCastile?src=hash
 
spaminator
#55
Stars vent outrage over Philando Castile police shooting acquittal | Celebrities
 
DaSleeper
#56
Blame it on trump!
Even if he wasn't president when the incident occurred!
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#57
What it’s like when the cops kill your son

By Kenithia Alston
JUNE 26, 2020

Here is what it’s like to have the police kill your son. One evening, you get a call from a friend on the scene at the time, saying that your 22-year-old son, Marqueese Alston, has been shot. No one from the police department contacts you until the next day, when officers show up at your door. They tell you that your son has been involved in an “incident” and extend their condolences — though they do not say he has been killed — and then hand you a business card for a sergeant at internal affairs and a printout with contact information for the District’s Medical Examiner’s Office.

By now, you know your son is dead; you know, from the phone calls of friends and family who have seen the news on TV, that the police encountered him in an alley, chased him and then shot him multiple times in broad daylight.

You try to get answers. Why did the police approach your son to begin with? Why did they fire at him so many times? The police keep changing their story in public statements: Officers approached him because he was acting suspiciously; no, they chased him after he reached into his waistband. They shot him because he drew a gun; no, they shot him after he shot at them first. (Contacted by a Washington Post editor, the D.C. police declined to comment for this story, pointing to ongoing litigation.)

You ask for the footage from their body cameras, but they refuse. They tell you Marqueese was an adult, and even though he’s dead, he’s the only one who has the right to see the footage. You ask for the results of their investigation; they tell you it’s underway, and they can’t release anything until it’s complete.

So you wait two months, then six; then 12, then 18; still no investigation report. You keep pushing to see the body cam video; they keep refusing. Finally, after pressure from local elected officials, the police give in a little. They require you to come into their precinct with only three people with you for support. You bring your lawyers and Marqueese’s brother, and they sit you in a room with an officer who plays a chopped-up and edited version of the footage. It tells you nothing. You ask for the full raw footage. They say no. You ask for the report on their investigation. They say it’s still not done. You ask just for the names of the officers who shot him. They say no. So now, two years have gone by, your son is still dead, and the police still won’t tell you why. They announce that they’ve cleared the officers involved but have yet to release their findings or give you any of the materials you requested.

Yet while the police know how to keep silent about their own, they are always quick to dredge up their victim’s past, pointing reporters to his robbery conviction, as if a previous brush with the law justifies killing someone. And through all this, they still protect the identities of those who killed him.

The truth is, like so many young men, black or white, rich or poor, Marqueese was just starting to make his way in the world. He had a young daughter, Lyric, whom he adored, a family that loved him, and a community that has seen far too many of its sons and daughters brutalized and killed by the police. To us, Marqueese’s life mattered; it still does.

This month, in the wake of George Floyd’s and Breonna Taylor’s deaths and nationwide protests demanding change, D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser painted “Black Lives Matter” across two city blocks to demonstrate her support for black communities. Symbols can be powerful, but without actions they are meaningless. If the mayor truly believes that black lives matter, for two years she had a chance to prove it to me when all I asked for was the truth about how and why the police killed my son. Now I’ve brought a wrongful-death lawsuit against the District in federal court.

I am done waiting; I am done being satisfied with symbolic gestures. The nation has been moved by protests demanding justice. That’s all I want for my son.