Teck oilsands mine.


Ron in Regina
Free Thinker
+4
#91
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Even at $75 a bbl there was little likelihood this project would be completed.

It was never a serious proposition.

I hear you. That would be why they spent over a BILLION Dollars and spent NINE YEARS to date on this project with a lifespan of 40 years minimum. What did a pack smokes or a jug of milk or a gallon of gas or a can of soup cost 40 years ago (?), or 30 years ago (?), or 10 years ago???
 
Most helpful post: The members here have rated this post as best reply.
Girth
+6
#92
Rex Murphy: The Teck decision is the culmination of Trudeau's anti-oil agenda
Rarely, if ever, has folly been granted such total rein, and incompetence a wider playground


Rex Murphy
February 24, 2020
2:28 PM EST

If one were to assemble a group of the most insidiously devious minds that this world has spawned (the Prof. Moriartys and Lex Luthors of the world) and ask them to devise the surest way to snap the bonds of Canadian Confederation, disenchant and alienate an entire productive region of the country, paralyze the nation’s transportation system and, while they were at it, deepen the rift with Canada’s Indigenous citizens, they’d report back in a heartbeat: “Sorry, we can’t come up with anything that beats what you’ve already got — the present Trudeau government.”

Teck Resources’ announcement that it is shelving its proposed Frontier oilsands mine is a political earthquake. It is the capstone of this government’s anti-oil and anti-Alberta policies. It shows that the turbulence of the past three weeks is about to be surpassed by something larger.

The cancellation follows the West Coast tanker ban, the stalled Trans Mountain and the Coastal GasLink pipelines, the rejection of Energy East and the dense thicket of always swelling regulations, assessments, protests and court cases. Teck is the last of a dark chain of projects that have been scrapped or strangled, which has resulted in billions of dollars being chased away from the country and tens of thousands of jobs aborted, while the Trudeau government danced and chattered away with its useless crusade against carbon-dioxide emissions. Rarely, if ever, has folly been granted such total rein, and incompetence a wider playground.


We don’t have a government in Ottawa; we have an Instagram page with executive authority. And it is a disaster, not because it is Liberal, but because it is led by a dilettante playacting the part of prime minister. The events of recent days show him palpably fading in authority, presence and capacity.


In the waning days of the SNC-Lavalin scandal, Trudeau was heard defending his interference with the rule of law by saying, “I will never apologize for standing up, fighting for Canadian jobs.” In what dream world was he inhabiting when he floated that boast? Say it out loud in Alberta today. Or Saskatchewan. Or say it to farmers or people in the forestry, construction or resource-development industries. They are all bearing the pain and carrying the cost of the government’s carbon taxes.

I hope the apology king has some apologies ready. He should apologize to the 7,000 Canadians who won’t get a job now that Teck is dead, to Canadian taxpayers for the billions in revenue the treasury will have to forgo from all the projects killed or chased away and for his obsession with global warming, which has fed the neglect, and even hostility, towards Canada’s industrial core.

There are some who, even in these early hours, are proclaiming that Teck’s announcement gets the Trudeau government “off the hook,” because now it doesn’t have to make the call over whether to approve the project. I would advise these thinkers to leave their burrows. This is the hook. There isn’t a single corner in this world — heck, they probably heard it in Senegal — that doesn’t know that Canada is now a place where investments go to die, where projects eagerly embraced become lost in some cavity of madly overzealous regulation, spend years getting revised and receiving additional conditions for approval, are mocked and slandered by busy climate cowboys and, after billions of dollars spent, simply go away.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney was right when he said that, “The factors that led to today’s decision further weaken national unity. The Government of Alberta agreed to every request and condition raised by the federal government for approving the Frontier project, including protecting bison and caribou habitat, regulation of oilsands emissions and securing full (unprecedented) Indigenous support.”


So was former B.C. premier Christy Clark when she said, “The Teck decision is a terrible turning point. Like Energy East, they were forced by ludicrously weak and confused fed policy to withdraw. Who will invest in Canada now??” Yes, who?

In all of this, however, my mind turns not to the leaders of industry or government, but to those who do not spout off on Twitter or drape ugly banners from bridges or high buildings. I think of the men and women who are fresh from trade schools and colleges, as well as older workers who have faced hardships due to the economic downturn. These people keep seeing glimpses of possible employment on the horizon and get animated by the fresh hope that work is on the way, only to see another project die, another dance of victory from the environmentalists and the anti-oil professionals. The job of these climate zealots is to make sure that no one else can get a job. And their job will never be finished, as there will always be another proposal to stop.

Rabid environmentalists put a blowtorch to the hopes and dreams of thousands of Canadian workers every time. They are gloating about their victory over Teck as we speak. It is a strange, strange world that would allow the amputation of our prospects, and leave unemployed people to worry their days away, while leaders head to Paris, or Davos, or even Senegal to chatter about “transitioning.”

It’s time to take the pot off the stove. It is boiling over with a fury.

National Post
 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
+4
#93
Another stick of wood to stoke the fires of separation
 
Hoid
#94
Oil Falls To $50 As Sentiment Sours
Oil prices erased early gains on Tuesday morning as fears of demand destruction continue to weigh on an already oversupplied market

https://oilprice.com/oil-price-charts#prices

Canadian Western Select is $28
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+2
#95
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

From what I understand, the approval has been sitting on Justin Trudeau's desk.....since July....after NINE YEARS of consultations and Environmental Hoops with some of the toughest regulations on the planet....stalling....and here we are. This is what I heard from Tech once the legalese is translated into plain and straight forward English:
"Sorry folks, but after the constantly moving goal posts, and the bureaucratic regulatory shell game of the Liberal Gov't, and the stalling....and then seeing the Done Deal that was the propane pipeline that just got opened up again for another 30 days of uncertainty....We'll eat our over a BILLION Dollars spent to date before we end up further tied to your Northern Banana Republic of Lawlessness and Ridiculousness. We'll take our TWENTY BILLION Dollars elsewhere like the other ONE HUNDRED & THIRTY BILLION Dollars that's already fled the Energy Sector in Canada in the last couple years and plant it somewhere saner like just over the border into the only country physically connected to your future third world joke of a country. Enjoy!!"

Tech should demand their money back that they had to layout for studies, assessments, consultation, permitting, and wasted time.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+4
#96
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Oil Falls To $50 As Sentiment Sours
Oil prices erased early gains on Tuesday morning as fears of demand destruction continue to weigh on an already oversupplied market
https://oilprice.com/oil-price-charts#prices


Canadian Western Select is $28

Pretty good deal compared to what your province paid for to get Saudi oil.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+2
#97
'Do what is necessary': Kenney hints at investment in major oil and gas project

Quote:

Premier Jason Kenney is suggesting the provincial government may financially back an oil and gas project.
In a Tuesday speech to the Edmonton Business Association luncheon — days after Teck Resources withdrew its application to build the $20-billion Frontier oilsands mine — Kenney said “uncertainty” on federal regulations is to blame for some energy projects pulling out of Alberta.
“I’m here to tell you today, as the premier of this province, that we are prepared to do what is necessary to ensure a future for this province’s economy, including for women and men, Indigenous people and new Canadians, and everyone who depends upon, either directly or indirectly, our energy industry,” said the premier. “I just say, stay tuned on that. I’ll give you a hint.”
Kenney then spoke about how former premier Peter Lougheed created the Alberta Energy Corporation (AEC) in the 1970s. That entity financed Syncrude Canada Ltd.

 
Hoid
#98
U.S. West Texas Intermediate fell 4% to trade at $46.91 per barrel, bringing the week’s decline to more than 12%, and the year-to-date loss to more than 23%. WTI is pacing for its fifth straight session of losses, and has tumbled even deeper into bear market territory, sitting 29% below its 52-week intraday high level of $66.60, reached last April.https://www.cnbc.com/2020/02/27/oil-...continues.html
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+2
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

U.S. West Texas Intermediate fell 4% to trade at $46.91 per barrel, bringing the week’s decline to more than 12%, and the year-to-date loss to more than 23%. WTI is pacing for its fifth straight session of losses, and has tumbled even deeper into bear market territory, sitting 29% below its 52-week intraday high level of $66.60, reached last April.https://www.cnbc.com/2020/02/27/oil-...continues.html

And this means what to you? And it has what to do with anything?
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#100
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

And this means what to you? And it has what to do with anything?

Oil is dead .
 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
+4
#101
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Oil is dead .


Dead, other than the fact that we would all be dead without it.


That's what you mean, right?
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#102
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Dead, other than the fact that we would all be dead without it.


That's what you mean, right?

That is true . Without oil how could I go to the Kootenaeys and home in one day ? A hundred years ago it took a week , one way .
 
Ron in Regina
Free Thinker
+3
#103
Decapoda's comment below is from two weeks ago:

Quote: Originally Posted by Decapoda View Post

Does anyone honestly believe this project is going to be approved? The Liberals have been clearly and concisely telegraphing their intent for the last two weeks with talks of aid packages for AB, headlines of Liberal MP's urging Trudeau to reject the mine....and now Liberal "special prairie representative" Jim Carr moving the goalposts by now declaring that the project must achieve zero emissions in order to be approved....a ridiculous and impossible requirement. Canadians are being played for fools by a circus clown who's currently on a world tour racking up the Canadian credit card, giving away millions of dollars we don't have to third world countries to promote gender equality.

My prediction...Trudeau and the Liberals will defer a decision and drag this out another couple of months, then they will kill it outright. Is there anyone out there who honestly believes this is going to go any other way? This country is being torn to shreds by Trudeau and his destructive foolishness.

Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Teck Resources pulls application from Frontier oil sands mine

http://tnc.news/2020/02/23/breaking-teck-resources-pulls-application-from-frontier-oil-sands-mine/

http://thestarphoenix.com/opinion/columnists/gormley-in-trudeau-land-maybe-this-really-is-post-national-canada
In 2015, newly minted Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, in an unguarded moment with the New York Times, glibly declared “Canada is the world’s first post-national state.”

He described Canadians’ “core values” as openness, respect, compassion, willingness to work hard, “being there for each other,” and seeking equality and justice. But Trudeau stated “there is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada.”

At the time, and since, it was easy to dismiss this as the undisciplined and pseudo-intellectual ramblings of an unserious mind. But in recent days there is a darker edge to this.

Perhaps in Justin Trudeau-land there really is no core Canadian identity; particularly in Western Canada nothing that anchors us — from longtime to new Canadians — to a common purpose or strives to unify us behind an ideal.

Intermittently since 2012, near B.C.’s Morice River, blockades have been erected by a tiny group of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs opposing Coastal GasLink’s natural gas pipeline, despite all 20 elected bands along the pipeline route supporting it, including the five Wet’suwet’en bands under the Indian Act. A band-owned business and many band members will work on the project.

In recent weeks, sympathy blockades have sprung up across the country. They invoke Indigenous rights and opposing pipelines in general, Coastal GasLink in particular and the shipment of liquid natural gas (LNG) to China. It is difficult to understand opposition to Canadian shipments to China of less carbon-dioxide intensive LNG to replace coal’s higher CO2 emissions and atmospheric pollution.

There are two reasons that Justin Trudeau bears responsibility for the growing activism, barricades and contempt for the law. First, his non-stop campaign of piety, virtue signalling, grandstanding and lecturing us on the holy troika of Indigenous reconciliation and “balancing the economy with the environment,” has been a green light for many activists to stop all oil and gas.

His second failing comes in his anemic response to the blockades, which have inconvenienced thousands of people and cost the Canadian economy billions of dollars. Absent in the early days while trolling for UN Security Council votes in Africa and Europe, Trudeau literally phoned in suggestions that the dispute be fixed by “dialogue, negotiation, alignment, engagement, and consultation.”



As the blockage of the CN mainline near Belleville, Ont., paralyzed passenger and freight service and resulted in many layoffs (1,500 railway employees alone), Trudeau supported the police decision to “keep the peace” by ignoring the enforcement of criminal, railway and trespass laws, and even allowing activists to flout court injunctions. What followed was the predictable deterioration of public order and respect for law.

Finally, Trudeau’s return to Canada was mired in inertia; the only decisive move was to bar Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer from a leaders’ meeting because of Scheer’s “unacceptable speech” which suggested blockades come down and the law be enforced. Three days later, a humbled Trudeau made the same decree but, as expected, it has since been largely ignored.



National Post columnist Jonathan Kay has observed that recently Canada’s identity has transformed to a country convinced that we are “a genocide state.” Canadian media, academic and political elites, Kay rightly points out, are obsessed with the narrative that we are “an ugly scar on traditional Indigenous lands,” and the “whole vocabulary — settler, neo-colonial, appropriation — declares that Canada is garbage, hoping that an attitude of self-abasement would somehow lead us to ‘reconciliation.’ We forgot that when garbage talks, no one listens.”



In the midst of this, just hours before it was expected to be axed by the Trudeau cabinet, Teck Resources withdrew its Frontier oilsands expansion, along with $21 billion in spending, 2,500 permanent jobs, and $70 billion in tax revenue. This pushes to $120 billion the value of resource projects cancelled in the last three years.

Given the events of recent days, who does not believe this is merely a rehearsal for the anarchy that will come if the Trudeau government-owned Trans Mountain pipeline extension ever tries to lay pipe?





 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+2
#104
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Another stick of wood to stoke the fires of separation

More like a whole truck load of logs and a superB of jet fuel.
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+2
#105
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

U.S. West Texas Intermediate fell 4% to trade at $46.91 per barrel, bringing the week’s decline to more than 12%, and the year-to-date loss to more than 23%. WTI is pacing for its fifth straight session of losses, and has tumbled even deeper into bear market territory, sitting 29% below its 52-week intraday high level of $66.60, reached last April.https://www.cnbc.com/2020/02/27/oil-...continues.html

Not bad. Still not as good as Tesla losing 15% overnight.
 
Hoid
#106
Let's see now - TSLA is up over $200 a share since New Years...
 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
+2
#107
That's from Musk et al taking out loans to prop up the share price.


Right now, the company shares are taking a gigantic nose-dive


It's a blood-bath
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
+2
#108



https://tnc.news/2020/02/24/david-su...bYRUk2EIuqa8Jo
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+4
#109
Teck Frontier cancellation should be ‘wake-up call’ for Canada: Freeland

Quote:

Teck Resource's decision to withdraw its Frontier mine application should be a "wake-up call" for Canadians, says Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland.
In an interview with The West Block's Mercedes Stephenson, Freeland said the country needs to take the decision as a turning point for a crucial conversation about the future of resource development in Canada.
“I think we need to treat Teck’s withdrawal as a wake up-call for our country and say, now is the time to do that hard work and actually face up to the fact that it’s a challenge — it’s a real challenge — to reconcile ambitious action on climate change and a strong economy and a strong oil and gas sector," she said.
"But we can do it and I think now is the moment for us to do that work."

Teck abandoned its bid to get federal cabinet approval for a proposed oilsands mining project worth roughly $20 billion last week.
Its CEO, Don Lindsay, wrote a public letter outlining the reasons for the decision, saying the company's application had "surfaced a broader debate over climate change and Canada’s role in addressing

"It is our hope that withdrawing from the process will allow Canadians to shift to a larger and more positive discussion about the path forward. Ultimately, that should take place without a looming regulatory deadline," he wrote.
The project had been billed by proponents as a litmus test of sorts for whether large-scale natural resource projects — specifically, those in the oil and gas sector — can get built under a government that has made tackling climate change a major part of their political agenda.

Teck's withdrawal prompted fierce criticism of the government from conservatives across the country who linked the uncertainty around the future of addressing climate change with the government's handling of three weeks of nationwide blockades.

Those were sparked by activists who declared themselves as acting in solidarity with the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs in B.C., who oppose a natural gas pipeline set to be built through their traditional territory with the consent of all elected chiefs from the impacted region.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has faced criticism for not condemning the blockades more quickly.
He only said they needed to come down roughly two weeks after the blockades had intermittently shut down railways, border crossings, roads and access to government buildings across the country.
Freeland said that decision was important.
“That was a crucial moment," she said of the statement by Trudeau calling for the blockades to come down.
"It was essential for him to say that and since then, what we have been seeing is progress — by no means concluded — but progress in getting the blockades dismantled.”
She said the challenge now must be addressing how to move forward.
“The tensions and the strains are absolutely real and now is the time for us to put our shoulder to the wheel and knit our country together," she said.
“What I think we need to do now is have a very urgent, very serious conversation between the federal government, the provincial government, the oil sector and indeed, the whole country talking about how do we achieve both of these perspectives.”

Can someone interpret for me what she is trying to say? All I got is blah, blah, blah Justin was right, blah, blah blah
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+3
#110
The first sentence is the only part that made any sense.It should serve as a wakeup call for everyone that cares about the future of our country. It is obvious that anyone on the left is not fit to govern the country.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#111
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Teck Frontier cancellation should be ‘wake-up call’ for Canada: Freeland



Can someone interpret for me what she is trying to say? All I got is blah, blah, blah Justin was right, blah, blah blah

It is challenging for the average Canadian to understand clear talking points . So I am uhh umm trying to ahhh respond to that umm ahh challenge .
 
petros
+3
#112
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Even at $75 a bbl there was little likelihood this project would be completed.
It was never a serious proposition.

Do we produce WTI?
 

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