World In 'Mass Extinction Spasm'


Scott Free
#1
Berkeley Scientists: World In 'Mass Extinction Spasm'


Devastating declines of amphibian species around the world are a sign of a biodiversity disaster larger than just the deaths of frogs and salamanders, University of California, Berkeley scientists said Tuesday.


Researchers said substantial die-offs of amphibians and other plant and animal species add up to a new mass extinction facing the planet, the scientists said in an online article this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"There's no question that we are in a mass extinction spasm right now," said David Wake, professor of integrative biology at UC Berkeley. "Amphibians have been around for about 250 million years. They made it through when the dinosaurs didn't. The fact that they're cutting out now should be a lesson for us."New species arise and old species die off all the time, but sometimes the extinction numbers far outweigh the emergence of new species, scientists said.Extreme cases of this are called mass extinction events. There have been only five in our planet's history, until now, scientists said.

The sixth mass extinction event, which Wake and others argue is happening currently, is different from the past events."My feeling is that behind all this lies the heavy hand of Homo sapiens," Wake said.The study was co-authored by Wake and Vance Vredenburg, research associate at the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at UC Berkeley and assistant professor of biology at San Francisco State University.There is no consensus among the scientific community about when the current mass extinction started, Wake said.It may have been 10,000 years ago, when humans first came from Asia to the Americas and hunted many of the large mammals to extinction.It may have started after the Industrial Revolution, when the human population exploded. Or, we might be seeing the start of it right now, Wake said.No matter what the start date, data show that extinction rates have dramatically increased over the last few decades, Wake said.The global amphibian extinction is a particularly bleak example of this drastic decline, he said.In 2004, researchers found that nearly one-third of amphibian species are threatened, and many of the non-threatened

More...

It seems that pesticides and other poisons are a likely culprit. I suspect the same problem is hurting bees and the oceans. We dump so much pesticide on this planet and release it into the air it seems absurd we would assume it is "safe." I'm sure car, industrial and airplane exhaust is playing a role too.

But with corporate lobbies so powerful I don't see how this mess can be cleaned up. Who the hell can f**k with Monsanto?

A mass extinction is be pretty bad news. It's hard to think what could be worse; nuclear war maybe?

That is the cycle though: an unchecked successful species expands until it's environment can't support it and then they die off en mass.
Last edited by Scott Free; Aug 13th, 2008 at 04:33 AM..
 
quandary121
#2
And with each and every death of a species ,another that lives on it suffers too,leading to yet another extinction and a spiralling downwards ,of yet more of the creatures that exist on the planet ,its called depoverished areas..
 
typingrandomstuff
#3
Oui. C'est l'histoire. Yes. It's the story.
 
typingrandomstuff
#4
Kum. There are population controls such as war, famine, and disease.

Oui. C'est l'histoire. Yes. It's the story.
 
lone wolf
#5
Dying out of frogs? You ought to see my front yard! This overly wet summer in Northern Ontario has been a tonic to them. Want frogs? C'mon by. I'll send a bootload of 'em home with ya!
 
L Gilbert
#6
Berkeley just found out? lol
Remember when Colorado killed off all their wolves? This resulted in a fairly largescale aging and dieoff of a few species of vegetation. The short of it is that no wolves resulted in massive upward spike of elk population which in turn resulted in a lot of new growth being eaten by the elk which in turn resulted in a list of aged and dying species. Everything is connected. Everything on the planet has a use and a job.
 
L Gilbert
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

Dying out of frogs? You ought to see my front yard! This overly wet summer in Northern Ontario has been a tonic to them. Want frogs? C'mon by. I'll send a bootload of 'em home with ya!

hehehe Starting to talk wit dat haxen dair?
 
typingrandomstuff
#8
Lone Wolf:
If you want to talk like an angry blacksmith, get some skills of the blacksmith.
 
Tonington
#9
Not only does everything have a job, losing species --whether because of encroaching human land use, or toxic chemicals that are building up, anoxic oceanic surface waters, or over harvesting --is destroying our heritage. We developed here on Earth, and at this time, with a cornucopia of species. They teach us how the Earth as a whole works, how nature solves problems too complex for our understanding, and we learn how to incorporate this knowledge into novel things like engineering, medicine, computing, waste reduction, and so many other things it boggles the mind.

Losing amphibians? Perhaps one very old species that has survived from the arrival of the amphibia class has natural defenses against a pathogen which has remained dormant somewhere. Or perhaps one has a very specific unknown cellular pump that allows the amphibian to recover from below the temperature where it's blood crystalizes, that is capable of functioning with human anatomy.

The list is so long. It's a shame what this Anthropocene might leave in it's wake.
 
typingrandomstuff
#10
 
L Gilbert
#11
And TRS is happy about it all, I guess.
 
coldstream
#12
...uhh.. it's utter nonsense.. it's from the same scientific paradigm that has given us Global Warming... all of it based on a profound pessimism, really an ecological religious article of faith, as to the pestilential effect of man on the pristine planet.

Where is the scientific method, the empirical proof .. it's all lost to blind faith in the cult of the disease of 'man'. The only thing that's becoming extinct is real science, replaced by moribund superstition.. and rampant fear mongering (okay, prophesies of doom in the religious parlance).

No useful technologies will be produced by this type of 'voodoo' conjuring (what's the use, we're all going to die, sacrificed on the alter of Mother Earth ) . Without technological progress science has lost its fundamental inspiration. It's replaced by gibberish like this. We have a major problem here, but it has nothing to do with the planet.. it has everything to do with a scientific establishment that has been taken over by a cult priesthood which is deeply antipathetic to humanity.
Last edited by coldstream; Aug 15th, 2008 at 07:38 AM..
 
lone wolf
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by typingrandomstuff View Post

Lone Wolf:
If you want to talk like an angry blacksmith, get some skills of the blacksmith.

Got some.... Care to lay your tenderlies on my anvil?
Last edited by lone wolf; Aug 15th, 2008 at 07:02 AM..
 
earth_as_one
#14
Of course we are in the middle of a mass extinction. Its not just frogs.

Quote:

The Current Mass Extinction:
Human beings are currently causing the greatest
mass extinction of species since the extinction of
the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. If present trends
continue one half of all species of life on earth will
be extinct in less than 100 years, as a result of
habitat destruction, pollution, invasive species,
and climate change. (For details see links below.)

http://www.well.com/user/davidu/extinction.html

In the longrun this is a bigger problem than global warming. Eventually we may be able to undo global warming or adapt, but how do we bring a species back from extinction?
 
darkbeaver
#15
"There is no consensus among the scientific community about when the current mass extinction started, Wake said.It may have been 10,000 years ago, when humans first came from Asia to the Americas and hunted many of the large mammals to extinction."

Carbon dating places humans in South America twenty thousand years ago, conclusivly. Some talk of thirty-five thousand years. The mass extinction of large mamals in north America occured 12,800 years ago, it was caused by a comet, the remains can still be found in permafrost in Alaska and the western Yukon. Frozen herds of meats jammed into the sides of mountains.
Extinction proceeds nevertheless.
 
lone wolf
#16
Yet ... this summer we've had a lot of weird elongated bee-like fuzzy bugs doing bee-like things in the flowers. I'm not into getting stung so that's about as scientific as I'm getting about them.
 
Scott Free
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

Dying out of frogs? You ought to see my front yard! This overly wet summer in Northern Ontario has been a tonic to them. Want frogs? C'mon by. I'll send a bootload of 'em home with ya!

Where I live in BC there once were so many frogs they were a hazard on the roads. Now I never see them.
 
Scott Free
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by L Gilbert View Post

Berkeley just found out? lol
Remember when Colorado killed off all their wolves? This resulted in a fairly largescale aging and dieoff of a few species of vegetation. The short of it is that no wolves resulted in massive upward spike of elk population which in turn resulted in a lot of new growth being eaten by the elk which in turn resulted in a list of aged and dying species. Everything is connected. Everything on the planet has a use and a job.

I can't help but wonder if our campaign against mosquitoes isn't causing some kind of similar problem? It seems like mosquitoes are a bad thing but maybe they are a cornerstone of the ecosystem. Certainly frogs eat them.
 
Lester
#19
Lot of dead zones in the oceans too, apparently huge swaths of the oceans are dead because of the lack of oxygen.
 
lone wolf
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Scott Free View Post

Where I live in BC there once were so many frogs they were a hazard on the roads. Now I never see them.

I wonder how much of the frog population is disappearing as we de-water the wetlands. Here in Sudbury district, frogs are a sign of an ecosystem recovering from a half-century's worth of sulphur dioxide and nickle oxide emissions from the smelters - but they don't sing at night like froggies did when I was a kid....
 
gullyfourmyle
#21
As it happens I've done years of research into this issue. I call it Chemical Winter. I have been trying to alert scientists to the problem of Volatile Organic Compounds since 2003. While there are still pockets of seemingly normal life around as stated by lone wolf but unfortunately, that is becoming more and more rare.

The problem is that when oil based fuel is burned, it doesn't burn cleanly. The emissions contain small amounts of the benzene family of chemicals. This is a highly corrosive substance that has only one purpose. That purpose is to disolve what it touches. The molecules are so small that they are known as transdermals. That means they pass through dermal (skin) membranes with little or no difficulty. They literally dissolve their way through for as long as they maintain viable strength.

Obviously the concentration is not high. But so much crude oil based fuel is being burned all over the planet that we are transforming our atmosphere from oxygen based to solvent based. When you inhale, each breath you take includes solvents in micro amounts. Each breath is a chemical assault on your person.

Babies from the age of zero to two years do not have an intact membrane barrier between their brains and the atmosphere. The olefactory nerve penetrates the skull through a perforated section just above the bridge of your nose. Where the nerves pass through, there is a tiny space all around the nerve sheath. After the age of two that space fills in with the membrane. Until it does, the baby's brain is exposed to the minute amounts of solvents. Depending on physiology and local atmospheric conditions, the baby is vulnerable to brain cancer. The risk is based on the density of the solvents and other corrosive chemicals floating about in the air. There is nowhere on earth that is safe from them except under water. And that is another truly ugly story.

Anyway, older people are also at higher risk because their immune systems are wearing out. But just because you happen to be between the age of 2 and 65 doesn't mean you're safe. Houses and commercial building interiors are almost 100% toxic unless they've been built with all natural materials. The trend to tighten up buildings, especially houses by eliminating drafts is the height of lunacy. As bad as outside air is, inside air is infinitely worse. Stopping drafts is the long form of committing suicide in a gruesome manner.

Going back to the natural world, all of our food crops and our domestic food animals are continually being bathed in the solvents. The solvent level in everything is increasing in lockstep as the planet becomes less able to support life of any sort. It doesn't matter whether or not you wash your food because the chemcials penetrate the skin.

The animals at the bottom of the food chain like caterpillars have not yet been told to wash their food before they eat it. So they are chowing down happily on their leaves that have a toxic coating on every surface. Some survive some don't. Those that are eaten by other creatures add their chemical burden to the food chain.

We are at the top of the food chain. We are becoming more and more toxic as lethal chemicals build up in every cell of our bodies. Since these are not grains of sand, these chemicals are not just sitting around thinking about kicking into action. No. These are chemicals who are every minute of every day attempting to turn your tissue into a puddle.

Once your organs have begun to break down in this fashion, you as an organism are in big trouble.

Smaller species are being affected first. The pollinating insects as a group, not just bees, are in serious trouble. A VOC molecule to an entity the size of a human is a tiny thing but to a small insect, it's another story altogether. VOC's to them are a big deal in terms of scale and degree of damage inflicted. So things like mayflies that are a major source of prey for fish are mostly wiped out. A very few decades ago, when they hatched, they carpeted the landscape. They were a very nutritious meal for all predators and ensured the fertility of the earth in a very natural way. The loss of the mayflies is a serious blow to all higher forms of life in eastern North America. The bees are as well due to their importance as pollinators, not just for crops but for trees as well. Those trees supply us with oxygen.

The frogs are another step up the food chain. Not only are they eating a steady diet of poison insects, they breathe through their skin. Their skin can't handle the solvents. It cools on impact, then burns. It doesn't wash off and even if it did, it's such a slow process they don't realize what's going on and the next thing they're dead.

That's how I discovered the phenomenon of Chemical Winter. A scientist by the name of Karen Lips was working in the tropics in isolated areas discovering one new species after the other in 1993. When she returned in 1995, instead of live frogs, she was seeing frog corpses everywhere. They were literally dying all around her. She literally watched rare species of frogs found no where else on earth go extinct right before her eyes.

Frog corpses don't happen in nature. They don't die of old age. They are eaten by something else - whole. Nothing left until their bones are excreted out the other end. Even they don't last long. So for Karen to be seeing dead frogs, that was a major serious event that made headlines around the world at the time.

Scientists everywhere scratched their heads. Me being an amateur scientist and also being into racing and working on cars, I had a pretty good idea what was going on. I checked with a neighbour who used to formulate jet fuel for Texaco and asked what had been done to the fuel recipe in like say, the five years before Karen discovered the frogs dying.

"Nothing." was his first respose. I didn't believe him and kept badgering him with more questions. In the end he admitted that in 1989, Texaco was the last big oil company to add solvents to jet fuel. Before that jet fuel was straight kerosene. The solvents were added to increase power and mileage.

When you look at a global map showing aviation routes, you can readily see the terrible impact aviation has on the planet. One look and I stopped thinking of aircraft as a means of transportation and saw them for what they really are - giant pesticide applicators. Pesticides by the way are made from those same solvents as are sprayed from the exhaust of every internal combustion engine. No matter what sort of machine you use, from an electric kettle to a car to an electric nose trimmer, at some point each and every thing we use generates poison into the atmosphere. Nothing we do has no deadly impact.

As the article stated, we are in the early stages of the sixth extinction. As a species, we will be extremely fortunate if any of us survives. Those that do will be those that live closest to the land and still understand how to make a living from it. That ain't most of us.

The point of no return is 2050. My contention has always been that is about 10 years too late. The bees won't last that long. If they don't we don't.

After my neighbour explained about the solvents, I started writing articles about Chemical Winter and tried to get them published in Science Journals. No one would listen. They thought I was nuts. Then I started phoning scientists all over North America. I convinced a number of them but had to stop due to lack of financial resources.

In 2005 I went to Trinidad due to a death in the family. While there I noticed there were no insects. I'd noticed the same thing in Canada in numerous areas. That year my windshield only killed two insects the entire summer. But Trinidad is right on the equator. It's covered in lush vegetation. When I was there in 1979/80, there were bugs everywhere. My former father in law is a biologist. When I mentioned the lack of bugs to him, he didn't believe it. But he did after we visited the Trinidad Zoo and saw none.

I was back earlier this year. Same thing, no bugs and no shore birds.

Chemicals are not the only problem. Cell phone towers and Hydro right of ways are leaking current as well and the death toll on wildlife and human life is staggering and easily equal to the destruction of the chemicals. One the fastest and best things we could do to delay the extinction is to get rid of the cell phone towers - take a step back in time and efficiency. It would mean huge sacrifices but it would buy us time while we figure out how to wean ourselves from oil. We don't have much time.

Sadly, most of you reading this don't have the benefit of having seen the planet as it was in the mid-twentieth century. It was in rough shape then but nothing like now. Most people see signs of progress. I see signs of destruction and a near total lack of comprehension from 99% of the public who think they are becoming "greener".

And those greener people are still out numbered on a vast scale by people who just do not get it. The only satisfaction to be gained from that is to be present to see the look of dawning comprehension and horror when they finally wake up and it's too late to turn back. Small comfort.
Last edited by gullyfourmyle; Aug 15th, 2008 at 09:49 PM..Reason: finish article
 
Walter
#22
Bloody homo sapiens.
 
darkbeaver
#23
Same thing where I live in Nova Scotia gullyfourmile, very few insects and very few birds and an even worse reptile and amphibian scarcity. I don't think recovery is possible as a matter of fact I think extermination is being purposely helped along.
 
gullyfourmyle
#24
While all the toxic material is floating in the air, gravity does as gravity always does at some point - it causes what went up to come down. So toxic material including corrosive solvents are constantly settling out of the atmosphere. As result, everything on the planet is acquiring an industrial strength coating much like a coat of paint that is steadily increasing in strength. Rather than build up on the surface, some evaporates, some is digested by organisms in soil and water and some are absorbed.

It has always been understood that chemicals settle out of the air and legislation allows for that. But the permission to pollute is based on the fact that the chemicals are dissipated within three days. Unfortunately those fine folks overlooked the fact that the chemicals are not released at three day intervals, they are released every minute of every day. Make that second or split second rather than minute. As you might expect, the organisms expected to do their jobs and deal with our mess have been overwhelmed. The more overwhelmed they become, the more damage is done.

Consequently we have the frog and insect die offs. Actually, it's not just frogs and insects. Those are just the species the media chooses to talk about. Really, all species up to and including us are taking a substantial hit.

We can record our chemical impacts because we have hospitals and medical recording systems. We call the chemical impacts cancer. But since the scientists and doctors are still having a terrible time getting their heads around the concept of poison falling from the sky and being absorbed into our bodies through every oriface and even where no orifaces exist, they are in space cadet mode and not telling the public the information that could make a crucial difference to our ability to survive as a species.

Other species are not even that lucky. For the most part, most species are being decimated without anyone paying the slightest attention. For some reason the birds aren't monitoring their own actuarial tables. The insects could care less. And when was the last time you heard a caterpillar telling his leaf mates to wash all their little handses and feets as well as the leaves they are standing on 30' above the ground with no clean water in sight?

Meanwhile the science community is slugging its collective head against the nearest boulder trying to identify specific viruses that are killing bees. They are totally overlooking the fact that it's everything, not just bees. There aren't enough scientists and facilities on earth to come up with a pill for every single immune system breakdown in every species. So it only makes sense to look at the problem in terms of what is killing everything at once.

That's when we go back to me being a science nut and a car nut. Apparently I'm unique. After talking as I mentioned, to scientists all over the world, I discovered that the scientists who study the natural world know squat about chemicals. What they know about solvents can be summed up in one word - NOTHING. How's that for scary? You probably thought that all these gifted bright guys all over the world were working assiduously to solve the problem of the extinctions based on common sense. Well you can only do that if you have some common sense to begin with and professional scientists are idiot savants when it comes to common sense.

In my case, since I already had a strong biological, zoological science base and since I work on cars and write how to automotive articles that demand I know my way around the chemcials used and the hazards they present, I was thoroughly equipped to make the connection between crude oil based solvents and the on-going destruction of life on earth. This didn't happen by design, I just have an unusually broad range of interests and a design background that demands that in order to pursue that occupation, you make a practice of thinking of things no one else does. And that's why I'm so interested in talking to Unforgiven. He challenges my thought process like no one else can generally speaking and that keeps me honest and on track. (But this subject isn't what I want to talk to him about.)

Anyway, the animal kingdom is literally dying all around us and we aren't paying attention. We're fooled because some species seem to be having unreasonable population explosions. Could that be because their predators have disappeared? Believe it or not, the animal that keeps bear populations in check is not man. It's wolves. So bears that live near urban centres escape wolf predation because wolves have learned to stay away even if it means starving to death. Bears still not accepted human dominance so they barge in and get shot.

My brother who lives in the BC interior told me that bears were going to start invading the towns two years ago. He said they'd come hungry - have a last meal - possibly of a human being and then ultimately be shot. As of right now, that's exactly what's happening. The bear invasion is being blamed on the berry crop collapse. But my brother didn't know two years ago that the berry crop would collapse this year. There's more going on than just the berries. Berries don't add anything to the fat layer bears need to hibernate. They provide a mid summer immediate energy supply to tide them over until more fatty meals are available. As it turns out, the best part of that fatty food source is grubs, caterpillars and adult bugs. Where do you suppose those are now? Ever heard of arial spray programs?

Another contributor to the problem is natural gas emissions. Our chimnies exhaust unburned natural gas and soot in relatively small quantities. But when you consider how the cumulative total amount on a country wide and world wide scale, the amount is mind boggling. Natural gas doesn't contain benzenes. But it's still 100% toxic. It's saving grace is that it burns cleaner than any other fuel. But when you have enough of anything, adding too much to exceed saturation is only going to cause problems. And consider this - we as a species intend to burn every single drop of crude that is in the ground no matter where it is. We are going to turn every drop of oil and every chunk of coal into air pollution in quantities that can't be handled by any process. We are turning the planet chemically inside out.

If you put the process into a fast forward video the planet would resemble a quickly rotting orange. Ever see an orange cure itself of mold? Me neither. Since mother nature hates to invent new processes, you can bet you life that she is repeating the mold process on earth using us as the agents of destruction.

Our government's answer to this is to encourage you to stop the drafts entering your house to keep your house warm with less fuel so poison yourselves in the process. They don't plan to tell you that though because it's bad for the economy. When you die, you boost income streams for every professional discipline between your corpse and the hole they stick you in or the polluting incinerator they shove you into. Having expired, you make room for an immigrant who, being from a tropical country had no emissions footprint. Each and every one of them that takes up residence here adds about 22 tons more pollution to the atmosphere.

The loss of that immigrant causes an intellectual, cultural and financial loss to the home country and ensures third world countries will stay third world countries.

Of course our economy is faltering so the government answer to that is to bring in more immigrants. Our economy is based on bringing in immigrants with money to spend here so they can have trees cut down in their honour to build them false-economically affordable housing while committing ecological crimes to do it.

The answer of course to the entire matter is a sudden and decisive human population die-off as mentioned in the lead article. It will come as that article stated as surely as night follows day and most people alive today will live to see it. Sadly most won't live to see the end of it.

The year 2050 mentioned earlier that I disputed isn't when everything is going to die. One or the other of those years is merely the tipping point - the point beyond which if we haven't already gotten rid of enough people and licked Chemical Winter, our species and most others will peter out. As Einstein famously said, World War III will be fought with modern weapons. The next war will be fought with sticks and stones - if anyone survives those people will be back in the stone age.

"There is no consensus among the scientific community about when the current mass extinction started, Wake said.It may have been 10,000 years ago, when humans first came from Asia to the Americas and hunted many of the large mammals to extinction."

That is not correct. It is generally accepted that the current mass extinction started when man gained the ability to move beyond the hunter gatherer stage. At that point, humanoids began altering the environment to suit themselves at the expense of and with no regard for other speices. Even today, despite the blabbering about green this and green that, the carnage continues. The green trend is good, but very few, myself included have the foggiest notion of how to go about actually slamming on the brakes without a holocaust. Since we are too squeamish to initiate a designer holocaust, nature will do it for us and those that are most vulnerable will pay the price and the Third Horseman's footsteps will march up the economic scale and levy a tariff that will become a modern Noah's Ark scenario.

On the bright side, those that properly anticipate the die-off properly will not only save themselves, but make a huge temporary profit in the process.

Steven King's The Stand is a pretty good analogy and Stephen R. Donaldson's Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, The Unbeliever series is another even sharper tale.

My advice is to start learning basic skills and recording them so there is a record for whoever survives to build from. The younger generation today is a collective sitting duck and could not last much more than a month or so of true economic collapse.

Once we're gone, within two weeks the planet will begin to recover and won't miss us a bit. Then some other species will evolve and start the process all over again.

At some point a speices will evolve that is versatile enough to be able to withstand the length of time involved in migrating from Earth to another planet before our sun goes Nova. We are merely contributors in that process. It won't be us because our physiology isn't capable of the rigors of long term space travel. But we do know species that can do it - insects. Most likely super intelligent cockroaches.

Who knew Gary Larson was such a brilliant prophet? I'll bet all this time you thought he was just drawing cartoons.
 
L Gilbert
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

I wonder how much of the frog population is disappearing as we de-water the wetlands. Here in Sudbury district, frogs are a sign of an ecosystem recovering from a half-century's worth of sulphur dioxide and nickle oxide emissions from the smelters - but they don't sing at night like froggies did when I was a kid....

A lot. We keep growing more and more people and we seem to like fresh water. Fresh water is not endless. Freshwater habitat is dwindling. Developers hate wetlands and love asphalt and concrete.

A few stats for you folks:
3% of the world's surface water supply is fresh water. About 65% of that is ice. About 30% is underground. map of freshwater stress
40% of the world's fish are fresh water species.
About 12% of ALL animal species need fresh water.
About a 3rd of the endangered or threatened species in North America inhabit wetlands.
20% of the world's humans have no access to fresh water for drinking.

Maybe this is just a cycle like global warming and there is nothing to be concerned about.
 
L Gilbert
#26
Perhaps some people refuse to believe that things are connected on this planet, but the evidence is overwhelmingly to the contrary. Others believe that because there's a big uproar about shrinking biodiversity that it must be a load of BS. Personally, I think people like this have a few missing nuts in the tree.
 
lone wolf
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by L Gilbert View Post

A lot. We keep growing more and more people and we seem to like fresh water. Fresh water is not endless. Freshwater habitat is dwindling. Developers hate wetlands and love asphalt and concrete.

A few stats for you folks:
3% of the world's surface water supply is fresh water. About 65% of that is ice. About 30% is underground. map of freshwater stress
40% of the world's fish are fresh water species.
About 12% of ALL animal species need fresh water.
About a 3rd of the endangered or threatened species in North America inhabit wetlands.
20% of the world's humans have no access to fresh water for drinking.

Maybe this is just a cycle like global warming and there is nothing to be concerned about.

Not so much a natural cycle as it is one of need. All you have to see is a hoe out in the middle of a marshland to know more land will soon be under cultivation - to replace land ten times as fertile that has succumbed to that land cancer we call urban sprawl.

Locally, we have calcium chloride being mixed into road salt so it works at lower temperatures. It saves the expense of cleaning up more efficient and environmentally friendly sand - all so some yuppie can blast through winter at 100 miles an hour in his Beamer. Meanwhile, calcium chloride works by drawing moisture - thus killing roadside vegetation and damaging wetlands. Isn't that why purple luistrife was declared a dangerous weed? Of course, any animal who chances to lick it up with the salt risks dehydration. No doubt, the frogs who inhabit those ditches are losing out to bare asphalt policies.
Last edited by lone wolf; Aug 16th, 2008 at 11:39 PM..
 
typingrandomstuff
#28
Yes. Frogs are dying and so is everything else. Wow.
 
Tonington
+2
#29
Thread necro.

North American freshwater fishes at present have an extinction rate 877 times the background geologic rate. In the last 114 years, 57 species and subspecies have gone extinct, along with 3 unique populations.

North American freshwater fishes race to extinction: Rate of loss of species exceeds that of terrestrial animals
 
L Gilbert
+2
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Tonington View Post

Thread necro.

North American freshwater fishes at present have an extinction rate 877 times the background geologic rate. In the last 114 years, 57 species and subspecies have gone extinct, along with 3 unique populations.

North American freshwater fishes race to extinction: Rate of loss of species exceeds that of terrestrial animals

Scary stuff, alright.
Had a kokanee problem here in Kootenay Lake a few years back. And this area is pretty green as far as mining and forestry areas go.
 

Similar Threads

0
Aurochs to be Returned From Extinction
by Bar Sinister | Jan 19th, 2010
15
Mass extinction
by Walter | Jan 6th, 2010
26
Extinction
by china | Jun 26th, 2007
16
Voluntary Human Extinction Movement
by MMMike | Nov 17th, 2005