Trumps win is major defeat for Christian Right


Kreskin
+1
#91
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Trump is a Christian! He says he is so he must be a good one.

Real Christians grab women by the pu__y, all of the time, right Walter?

He's the best! You won't even believe it how good he is!
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#92
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

He does want women back in the kitchen with just enough chain to reach the bedroom so that makes him popular with the evangelicals

You made that up silly boy .
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#93
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Why wouldn't they.

Oh, I see! Not only are you a Catholic, You're a goddam Catholic Bishop!

Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Trump is not running around quoting the bible and acting saintly .

He's still bulsh1tting the Republicans that he's even a Christizn, at all. You can't join their club without perfoming that bit of theatre.
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
+1
#94
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
#95
Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

Many evangelical Christian leaders, both progressive and conservative, express profound, faith-based opposition to Donald Trump.


But the reasons for our opposition mainly differ. This difference is often lost on outside observers.

Progressive evangelicals mainly worry over Donald Trump’s xenophobia and bigotry, considering these a violation of core Christian moral values. Conservative evangelicals mainly worry over Trump’s disinterest in a conservative Christian social policy agenda, also believed to be at the heart of Christian moral values. (Both worry over his character and temperament.)

One way to tell the difference between these two kinds of opposition is to consider our conflicting reactions to the departure of Ted Cruz from the presidential race.

As a progressive evangelical Christian, there was very little about Ted Cruz or his platform that appealed to me. I thought Senator Cruz was one of the most effective Christian Right/social conservative Republican candidates for president to be seen since the rise of the Christian Right in the late 1970s. The script was old; the messenger was new, and ruthlessly effective. He did much, much better than the other Christian Right candidates on offer in 2016, including Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum.

That Christian Right script is worth recalling, if only to consider its contrast to the message of Donald Trump:

here

Trump victory marks major defeat for Christian Right agenda | Religion News Service

Sorry just not seeing a downside to that.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+1
#96
Even though the crazed Michelle Bachmann told us Dump is God's chosen candidate for the White House, many right wing television evangelist "Christian" politicians have withdrawn their support for him:



Here's A List Of All The Trump "Unendorsements" Of The Last 24 Hours



The list of Republicans rushing to retract their endorsements of Donald Trump expanded “bigly” as the candidate might say, growing from one singer-songwriter in April to include 28 GOP congressman, Senators, Governors and former presidential nominees. It’s all documented in detail on Wikipedia as Trump’s own party races to cover their own behinds, after misleading the American public into thinking that Donald Trump was actually, somehow in any way shape or form fit to be President of the United States.

Leading the list is 2008 nominee Sen. John McCain, who really has had so many chances to unendorse Trump, but instead painfully carried water for the cruel candidate who mocked him, insisting that his “heroes don’t get captured.” Former 2016 contender Carly Fiorina whose face and looks Trump famously insulted finally noticed that the Republican nominee is horrendous.

Even Salem Radio host and MSNBC personality Hugh Hewitt finally gave up supporting this year’s Republican nominee after publicly changing his position in June once it became apparent that Trump would survive the Republican National Convention as his party’s nominee. Hewitt moderated one of the Republican primary debates earlier this year for CNN. This list of politicians who endorsed and now un-endorse sure to grow:

Kelly Ayotte, U.S. Senator from New Hampshire (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Robert J. Bentley, 53rd Governor of Alabama (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Bradley Byrne, U.S. Representative for Alabama’s 1st congressional district(retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Aaron Carter, singer (retracted Apr. 29, 2016)
Jason Chaffetz, U.S. representative for Utah’s 3rd congressional district (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Mike Crapo, U.S. Senator from Idaho(retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Rodney Davis, U.S. Representative for Illinois’s 13th congressional district (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Dennis Daugaard, Governor of South Dakota (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Carly Fiorina, former CEO of Hewlett Packard, former 2016 candidate for president (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Deb Fischer, U.S. Senator from Nebraska (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Jeff Fortenberry, U.S. Representative for Nevada’s 1st congressional district (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Cory Gardner, Senator from Colorado (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Cresent Hardy, U.S. Representative for Nevada’s 4th congressional district (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Joe Heck, U.S. Representative for Nevada’s 3rd congressional district (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Gary Herbert, 17th Governor of Utah (retracted Oct. 7, 2016)
Hugh Hewitt, radio host (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Jon Huntsman Jr., 16th Governor of Utah (2005–2009) (retracted Oct. 7, 2016)
John McCain, Senator from Arizona (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Lisa Murkowski, Senator from Alaska (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Tim Pawlenty, 39th Governor of Minnesota (2003–2011) (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Michael Reagan, son of the 40th President Ronald Reagan (retracted Oct. 2, 2016)
Martha Roby, U.S. Representative for Alabama’s 2nd congressional district (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Tom Rooney, U.S. Representative for Florida’s 16th congressional district (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Brian Sandoval, Governor of Nevada (retracted June 7, 2016)
Chris Stewart, U.S. Representative for Utah’s 2nd congressional district. (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
Dan Sullivan, Senator from Alaska (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
John Thune, U.S. Senator from South Dakota (retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
David Valadao, U.S. Representative from California’s 21st congressional district (retracted June 22, 2016)
Ann Wagner, U.S. Representative for Missouri’s 2nd congressional district(retracted Oct. 8, 2016)
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#97
What will fill a big Christian vaccumn, feathers? hot air? the undigestables I'm a christian, I have never met another?
 
MHz
#98
It is better if we don't bunch up. That doesn't seem to do any other group any good during 'hard times'.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Im not to sure of that there's billions of perspective about where as well as why and when and whatfor, who the fukj kniows

Einstien sucked.
 
MHz
#100
I take that back, if you look at the 'big picture' two people tagging up isn't overdoing the 'grouping up' bit. I stand corrected. Did somebody let a cold draft in??
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
+1
#101
 
davesmom
+1
#102
Maybe they stand like that because it's a proper way for a lady to stand in front of a public audience.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
#103
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post





they are guarding against a p◇ssy attack
 
tay
#104
Jerry Falwell Jr. Axed Anti-Trump Story from Liberty University’s School Newspaper

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/10/18/jerry-falwell-axes-anti-trump-story-from-liberty-university-s-student-newspaper.html?via=twitter_page



 
EagleSmack
#105
Quote: Originally Posted by davesmom View Post

Maybe they stand like that because it's a proper way for a lady to stand in front of a public audience.

As if Cliffy would know that.
 
tay
+2
#106
 
Ludlow
No Party Affiliation
#107
Murcans be b stoopid we be dumbed down too much cain't even figger thangs out no mo we be fooked in the hayds.
 
tay
#108
End Times Pastor: Donald Trump Could Be The Messiah Or His Forerunner






They’re looking at Donald Trump” as the messiah, Horn said of “the rabbis,” saying that Trump’s name “actually means ‘messiah.’”

Among the clues that Trump may be the messiah, he said, is that the president-elect is a kingly and warrior-like leader committed to protecting Israel and, according to Horn, rebuilding the Temple of Jerusalem.

Horn said that if Trump is not the messiah, then he is likely “the forerunner” to the messiah who “will start the message in the wilderness and the messiah is going to come in on his heels.”

If Trump turns out to only be a John the Baptist-like figure, Horn explained, then his inauguration will signal the beginning of the “countdown to the appearance of the messiah.”

But the “rabbis” who “do think he is the messiah,” Horn said, are looking for proof that Trump’s “bloodline goes back to the Davidic dynasty.”

Horn added that the Antichrist is also about to materialize, but is definitely not Trump.

video

End Times Pastor: Donald Trump Could Be The Messiah Or His Forerunner | Right Wing Watch
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#109
Pure Americana.

Love it.
 
tay
#110
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Pure Americana.

Love it.

Oh but wait, there's more. You see Trump was seen as a no gooder for the thumpers because he's not religious, but they really like Pence and Bannon, born agains and some of the others in Trump's Team...

Jim Bakker: Trump’s Election Is ‘The Greatest Miracle I Have Ever Seen’




Jim Bakker continues to gush over Donald Trump and extol his election as president , but this time with a new twist: Trump, he said, may usher in the Last Days.

While hawking his survivalist products, the right-wing televangelist said that Trump may rebuild the Temple in Jerusalem and hasten Jewish immigration to Israel, citing two articles from an End Times outlet called “Breaking Israel News.”
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#111
Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

Oh but wait, there's more. You see Trump was seen as a no gooder for the thumpers because he's not religious, but they really like Pence and Bannon, born agains and some of the others in Trump's Team...

Jim Bakker: Trump’s Election Is ‘The Greatest Miracle I Have Ever Seen’




Jim Bakker continues to gush over Donald Trump and extol his election as president , but this time with a new twist: Trump, he said, may usher in the Last Days.

While hawking his survivalist products, the right-wing televangelist said that Trump may rebuild the Temple in Jerusalem and hasten Jewish immigration to Israel, citing two articles from an End Times outlet called “Breaking Israel News.”

They invested the same sort of hope in George Dubya and his band of Merry Men, whom they hoped would begin Armageddon and bring on the glorious end times, hence the invasion of Iraq where "the Plain of Megiddo" or Armageddon is thought to be.
 
Ludlow
No Party Affiliation
#112
Praise the Troomp.
 
tay
#113
While the relatively few mainstream media and alternative media covers of the CNP have typically described the group as merely “conservative”, that hardly sums things up.

Over the years, these would-be masters of the world have included a number of leaders from the Christian Reconstructionism movement who advocate the imposition of strict biblical law including execution for adultery, blasphemy, homosexuality, and witchcraft (and a much longer list of offenses).

In effect, the CNP is command central for the culture wars that have since the mid 1970s wracked America ; it is the organizational center for a movement engaged in a slow-motion “soft revolution” to “reclaim” America and return it to its alleged “Judeo-Christian” roots.

The time is long overdue for mainstream media to stop pooh-poohing this movement ; especially because that crass dereliction of journalistic duty has helped pave the way for the rise of Donald Trump.

Back in 2011, a gang of mainstream media pundits (such as Ross Douthat, Michael Gerson, Mark Pinsky, Lisa Miller, and others) launched an all-out effort to poo-pooh (see 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ) reporting, especially from the website I co-founded in 2005 with Frederick Clarkson, concerning ties between various GOP presidential hopefuls ( such as Rick Perry ) in the 2012 election and the movement referred to as “dominionism”.

Another term for “dominionism” is “Christian supremacy” ; it’s a tendency on the spectrum that runs towards theocracy.

Now, the dominionists are running Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.

As it happens, Donald Trump has just appointed Stephen K. Bannon and Kellyanne Conway to head his faltering presidential campaign.

Both are listed 2014 members of the most powerful and influential dominionist organization in America, the Council For National Policy .

We know this because, conveniently (for secular America at least ), last May 2016 the Southern Poverty Law Center made public an official 2014 membership directory of the secretive, far right, dominionist Council For National Policy.

It was a startling intelligence coup — for years, fragmentary lists of the CNP had sporadically emerged. Now, here it was — the official CNP handbook.

While Bannon was just a CNP member, Conway was listed as being a member of the CNP Executive Committee.

Close religious right observer Sarah Posner covered the CNP in this useful Alternet story on the group. To get a sense of what’s discussed at CNP meetings, click on the various meeting descriptions at this CNP website page .

In October 2015, a number of 2016 election GOP nominee contenders addressed the CNP . Donald Trump, it seems, was not invited.

In effect, the CNP is command central for the culture wars that have since the mid 1970s wracked America ; it is the organizational center for a movement engaged in a slow-motion “soft revolution” to “reclaim” America and return it to its alleged “Judeo-Christian” roots.

The time is long overdue for mainstream media to stop pooh-poohing this movement ; especially because that crass dereliction of journalistic duty has helped pave the way for the rise of Donald Trump.

And, in the event Trump loses, that will not be the end, nor will he be the last “Trump” to plague national politics.

The CNP will continue, and it will orchestrate an attempted replay of the 2010 election, when the Tea Party movement helped power the Republican recapture of the House of Representatives.

Further, there will be more Trumps to come, now that The Donald has established the electoral power of the brand of populist paleoconsrvatism pioneered by Pat Buchanan in the ‘92, ‘’96, and 2000 elections. The future Trumps will triangulate on less abrasive style - more refined, more effective, even more deadly to pluralist democracy.



 
tay
#114
Donald Trump may not know that Second Corinthians is not called Two Corinthians and I don’t know where Christianity endorses sexual assault, mocking the disabled or racism but on Fox News, Trump is almost as Christian as Jesus, himself.

On Monday, Fox & Friends host Abby Huntsman conducted a softball interview with Trump’s “spiritual advisor,” Paula White, also the Chair of his Evangelical Advisory Board. After working in a clip of Donald and Melania Trump getting a standing ovation at Christmas Midnight Mass, Huntsman asked, “How special was that moment with them walking in as being president-elect now?”

“Absolutely special," White replied. "What so many people might not recognize is that’s very normal for President-elect Trump and for his family to attend Church every Christmas. Christianity is such a large part, his faith is such a large part of his life.”

Of course, Huntsman didn’t ask why, then, Trump didn’t know about Corinthians. Nor how a supposedly devout Christian could behave as he does. Nor did she ask why the New York church Trump claimed to be a member of said he was not an active member .

Nor did Huntsman tell the viewers this little nugget of White’s history that indicates she may be soul mates with Trump in a less Christian way. From CNN :
White was part of 2007 Senate investigation into abuses of nonprofit status by several megachurch pastors and televangelists. The investigation ended in 2011 with no penalties or findings of wrongdoing.
Instead, Huntsman egged on White to tell us more about Trump’s spirituality. “You have known him for 15 years. Talk to us about how you both met,” Huntsman said.
WHITE: I received a phone call almost 15 years ago, and he was watching Christian television, and he repeated back to me literally, verbatim, three of my sermons on Value Vision, and we started talking about God and … how he was confirmed as a Presbyterian … The relationship grew over the years, and I’ve had the wonderful privilege of just not only being a friend, but a spiritual advisor and praying over him, his family, his staff … It’s been amazing to watch him just walk out his faith … I’ve had the wonderful privilege of being up at Trump Tower every single week because in the faith community, President-elect Trump not only embraces his own personal faith, but he’s not giving us just a position, but he’s integrating us with policy with positions with his administration … It just speaks volumes to say he’s a friend to us, and we are a friend to him, and he’s opened up his office and his life and his table and they’re so many people I’ve watched just literally hundreds of pastors pray over him, stand with him, advise him, he’s always taking the calls.”
Huntsman wondered how Trump’s deep faith might “be able to help him heal this nation?”

“He is a unifier,” White assured us, despite so much evidence to the contrary . “We’ve watched the businessman Trump already begin to bring together some of the greatest leaders to fix some of the hardest problems in America, so will he do with his faith … He’s one of the greatest leaders I’ve ever been able to experience.”

Again, Huntsman didn't challenge a word. Instead, she closed by validating White: “Some powerful words. it was great to have you here.”

Watch this claptrap below, from the December 26, 2016 Fox & Friends.

Read more at Fox News Pretends Donald Trump Is A HUGE Christian - NewsHounds
 
tay
+1
#115
An interesting article particularly for the Jesus believers..........

Indeed, the Bible does not offer individual responses or solutions to society’s problems, but instead offers social responses and solutions.


As President Donald Trump attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, proposes a budget that is the largest transfer of wealth from the poor to the rich since the end of the Civil War, and denies the rights of immigrants and religious minorities, a group of evangelical leaders was photographed laying hands on him . When the Rev. Barber wrote an open letter to the clergy involved, his critique of “praying” for someone who is “preying” on the poor struck a nerve. One response reads:
I totally reject the idea that some of the folks have promoted that unless you believe in big government redistribution of money from one group of people to another that somehow you are not following the Gospel of Jesus Christ. That is just absurd. There is no teaching in Christ’s ministry in which He advocates for government to care for the poor. Every message in His ministry is a call to individual Christians and, by implication, churches, to do that.
We want to refute the statement that there are not clear teachings on the responsibility of society to pass policies that end poverty. As preachers and biblical scholars, it is imperative that we lean on the Bible and teach and preach to all what it really says about the poor, economic justice, and what believers are required to do to obey God. As people committed to justice and love, we must stand on the shoulders of those who have come before us in the struggle for equality and freedom to learn and affirm that ending poverty and systemic racism is possible.

Indeed, the Bible does not offer individual responses or solutions to society’s problems, but instead offers social responses and solutions. The books of Deuteronomy and Leviticus, written for leaders in society, discuss the policies and programs they are commanded to put in place to follow the will of God on caring for the stranger, on releasing captives, on providing for the poor. In fact, the whole of the Bible—starting with Genesis and ending in Revelation—has the arc of justice. Anti-poverty programs run through it.

This arc starts with the exodus and manna, which is most likely a response to Joseph and the Pharaoh’s setting up a system where a few religious and political leaders amassed great wealth at the expense of the people, as God’s plan is for society to be organized around meeting the needs of the people. It runs through Deuteronomy and the legal codes, which describe how society and our political and religious leaders are supposed to release slaves, forgive debts, pay people what they deserve, and distribute funds to the needy. It then continues through the prophets who insist that the way to love and honor God is to promote programs that uplift the poor and marginalized, and who decry those with religious and political power who cloak oppression in religious terms and heretical theology.

Finally, through the life and ministry of our Lord Jesus Christ, we follow a Savior who travels across the land preaching liberation, setting up free health clinics and compelling society to live out the jubilee codes and sabbath prescriptions. Even the Apostle Paul, in four of his letters, sets up the collection for the poor of Jerusalem and insists that the role of society isn’t to impoverish the poor with taxes while the rich get tax breaks, but that community prosperity rests on a radical redistribution of wealth from the top to the bottom. Indeed, there is nothing more theologically significant in the epistles than the exhortation to care for the poor, to resist taxes that impoverish the poor, and to promote programs that uplift the poor. The Bible teaches us that releasing slaves, forgiving debts, paying people a living wage, and offering funds to those who need it—knowing that they will never pay those debts back—is how we create a prosperous society for all.

Therefore, in a time when 32 million Americans are being cut off of health care, it is important to decry the hypocrisy of our religious and political authorities, and to remind ourselves that God requires justice and denounces those who oppress the poor. We can turn to Matthew 23 for further instruction on this; Jesus exhorts that there were so-called moral leaders in his day who, instead of standing for justice and inclusion, acted as opponents of the poor, opponents of Jesus, and opponents of early Christianity. Jesus accused the political and religious authorities of his day, who in fact practiced the same religion as he did, for tying up heavy burdens for others to carry, for worshiping power and wealth, and for crossing land and sea to convert one person while ignoring the demands of justice, mercy, and faithfulness at home. Jesus condemned the hypocritical religious leaders of his day for holding gold and religious temples sacred rather than God, who made gold and those religious sites sacred and valuable in the first place.

The critique resonates with a comment from a mom organizing against the effects of the BP oil spill in the Gulf Coast: “You can’t eat gold, you can’t eat oil. Why then do we worship it and try to get so much of it?” It resonates with the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan, as well. The families of Flint are still struggling with the poisoning of their water and their whole bodies and their children’s bodies: their whole community. They were poisoned for years, while the General Motors plant got switched back to clean water after just months, complaining that the Flint water was corroding their engine parts. Poor moms there are saying: “What good is it if you can go to a store and get lead-free paint, and go to a gas station and buy lead-free gas, but you can’t go home and get lead-free water?”

We must stop worshiping gold and profit and power, and start worshiping—and therefore practicing—the justice, mercy, and faithfulness of God.

It is important to conclude with a lesson from history: that poverty isn’t eternal or inevitable, and that programs to reduce poverty have been and still are effective. The Russell Sage Foundation has published Legacies of the War on Poverty, which demonstrates that poverty and racial discrimination would likely have been much greater today if the War on Poverty had not been launched. It documents how the War on Poverty reduced the school-funding gap between poorer and richer states, prompted Southern school districts to desegregate, contributed to a decline in elderly and childhood poverty, reduced infant mortality, and uplifted the lives of many. The solutions to the crisis of poverty exist. They resonate with what the Bible teaches us about the moral necessity to fight poverty.

We must do justice, love kindness, and walk humbly with God. We must help bring in God’s reign of economic justice and prosperity for all. We must start by ending poverty and systemic racism for everyone. It can be done, it has been done already, and we must do it now. The lives of millions of God’s children depend on it

https://www.thenation.com/article/a-...-bible-lately/
 
Walter
#116
Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

An interesting article particularly for the Jesus believers..........

Indeed, the Bible does not offer individual responses or solutions to society’s problems, but instead offers social responses and solutions.


As President Donald Trump attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, proposes a budget that is the largest transfer of wealth from the poor to the rich since the end of the Civil War, and denies the rights of immigrants and religious minorities, a group of evangelical leaders was photographed laying hands on him . When the Rev. Barber wrote an open letter to the clergy involved, his critique of “praying” for someone who is “preying” on the poor struck a nerve. One response reads:

I totally reject the idea that some of the folks have promoted that unless you believe in big government redistribution of money from one group of people to another that somehow you are not following the Gospel of Jesus Christ. That is just absurd. There is no teaching in Christ’s ministry in which He advocates for government to care for the poor. Every message in His ministry is a call to individual Christians and, by implication, churches, to do that.
We want to refute the statement that there are not clear teachings on the responsibility of society to pass policies that end poverty. As preachers and biblical scholars, it is imperative that we lean on the Bible and teach and preach to all what it really says about the poor, economic justice, and what believers are required to do to obey God. As people committed to justice and love, we must stand on the shoulders of those who have come before us in the struggle for equality and freedom to learn and affirm that ending poverty and systemic racism is possible.

Indeed, the Bible does not offer individual responses or solutions to society’s problems, but instead offers social responses and solutions. The books of Deuteronomy and Leviticus, written for leaders in society, discuss the policies and programs they are commanded to put in place to follow the will of God on caring for the stranger, on releasing captives, on providing for the poor. In fact, the whole of the Bible—starting with Genesis and ending in Revelation—has the arc of justice. Anti-poverty programs run through it.

This arc starts with the exodus and manna, which is most likely a response to Joseph and the Pharaoh’s setting up a system where a few religious and political leaders amassed great wealth at the expense of the people, as God’s plan is for society to be organized around meeting the needs of the people. It runs through Deuteronomy and the legal codes, which describe how society and our political and religious leaders are supposed to release slaves, forgive debts, pay people what they deserve, and distribute funds to the needy. It then continues through the prophets who insist that the way to love and honor God is to promote programs that uplift the poor and marginalized, and who decry those with religious and political power who cloak oppression in religious terms and heretical theology.

Finally, through the life and ministry of our Lord Jesus Christ, we follow a Savior who travels across the land preaching liberation, setting up free health clinics and compelling society to live out the jubilee codes and sabbath prescriptions. Even the Apostle Paul, in four of his letters, sets up the collection for the poor of Jerusalem and insists that the role of society isn’t to impoverish the poor with taxes while the rich get tax breaks, but that community prosperity rests on a radical redistribution of wealth from the top to the bottom. Indeed, there is nothing more theologically significant in the epistles than the exhortation to care for the poor, to resist taxes that impoverish the poor, and to promote programs that uplift the poor. The Bible teaches us that releasing slaves, forgiving debts, paying people a living wage, and offering funds to those who need it—knowing that they will never pay those debts back—is how we create a prosperous society for all.

Therefore, in a time when 32 million Americans are being cut off of health care, it is important to decry the hypocrisy of our religious and political authorities, and to remind ourselves that God requires justice and denounces those who oppress the poor. We can turn to Matthew 23 for further instruction on this; Jesus exhorts that there were so-called moral leaders in his day who, instead of standing for justice and inclusion, acted as opponents of the poor, opponents of Jesus, and opponents of early Christianity. Jesus accused the political and religious authorities of his day, who in fact practiced the same religion as he did, for tying up heavy burdens for others to carry, for worshiping power and wealth, and for crossing land and sea to convert one person while ignoring the demands of justice, mercy, and faithfulness at home. Jesus condemned the hypocritical religious leaders of his day for holding gold and religious temples sacred rather than God, who made gold and those religious sites sacred and valuable in the first place.

The critique resonates with a comment from a mom organizing against the effects of the BP oil spill in the Gulf Coast: “You can’t eat gold, you can’t eat oil. Why then do we worship it and try to get so much of it?” It resonates with the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan, as well. The families of Flint are still struggling with the poisoning of their water and their whole bodies and their children’s bodies: their whole community. They were poisoned for years, while the General Motors plant got switched back to clean water after just months, complaining that the Flint water was corroding their engine parts. Poor moms there are saying: “What good is it if you can go to a store and get lead-free paint, and go to a gas station and buy lead-free gas, but you can’t go home and get lead-free water?”

We must stop worshiping gold and profit and power, and start worshiping—and therefore practicing—the justice, mercy, and faithfulness of God.

It is important to conclude with a lesson from history: that poverty isn’t eternal or inevitable, and that programs to reduce poverty have been and still are effective. The Russell Sage Foundation has published Legacies of the War on Poverty, which demonstrates that poverty and racial discrimination would likely have been much greater today if the War on Poverty had not been launched. It documents how the War on Poverty reduced the school-funding gap between poorer and richer states, prompted Southern school districts to desegregate, contributed to a decline in elderly and childhood poverty, reduced infant mortality, and uplifted the lives of many. The solutions to the crisis of poverty exist. They resonate with what the Bible teaches us about the moral necessity to fight poverty.

We must do justice, love kindness, and walk humbly with God. We must help bring in God’s reign of economic justice and prosperity for all. We must start by ending poverty and systemic racism for everyone. It can be done, it has been done already, and we must do it now. The lives of millions of God’s children depend on it

https://www.thenation.com/article/a-...-bible-lately/

Just another leftie rag.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
#117
Quote:

unless you believe in big government redistribution of money from one group of people to another that somehow you are not following the Gospel of Jesus Christ


Anyone who doesn't believe it should read their own Bible.
 
Walter
#118
Christians Bet on Trump and Won
https://spectator.org/christians-bet-on-trump-and-won/

The OP is so fake news. MAGA
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
-1
#119
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Christians Bet on Trump and Won
https://spectator.org/christians-bet-on-trump-and-won/
The OP is so fake news. MAGA

Those aren't real Christians.
 
Hoid
+1
#120
What real christian wouldn't support a porn star bangin pussy grabber on his third wife?
 

Similar Threads

33
Donald Trumps immigration plan
by B00Mer | Sep 30th, 2015
16
Canadian Economist Trumps American Amateur
by TeddyBallgame | Feb 17th, 2013
0
Science trumps politics: Israeli President
by mentalfloss | May 10th, 2012