More from the french: Of Québec


Vincent_2002
#1
I live in Québec, but im not francophone. They want to make more controversy in Canada, here's an interesting article i had posted in the chat forum.

http://www.canadiancontent.net/forum...opic.php?t=490
 
Stretch
Free Thinker
#2
At least then we may get two sides to this war rather than the very biased one we get now.


Thursday March 27, 3:06 AM
Al Jazeera TV wins award for battling censorship

LONDON (Reuters) - Al Jazeera television, which beams into 35 million Arab homes, received an award on Wednesday for its resistance of censorship.
The accolade from the British-based Index on Censorship was given for Al Jazeera's "apparent independence in a region where much of the media is state-run."

The Index on Censorship said the channel, which came to worldwide prominence after broadcasting video tapes of Osama bin Laden, has won a reputation for credible news.

"That same quality has enraged Arab governments and the United States," the Index, a group of leading media figures, writers and people concerned with freedom of speech, said in a statement.

The Golden Raspberry award for services to censorship was given to Zimbabwe's information minister Jonathan Moyo.

Al Jazeera went on air in 1996 with a $137 million budget from Qatar's Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani and has since captivated Arab viewers with talk shows on subjects considered taboo by other mostly state-run stations.

Its professional, Western-network-style bulletins and scoops on major stories have earned it the respect of its audiences but brought criticism from their conservative governments.

The station's popularity soared during the first weeks of the U.S.-led war on Afghanistan as it was the only network allowed to operate by the Taliban, who then controlled the country.

The United States has accused the channel of inflaming anti-American sentiment in the Middle East by carrying the speeches of bin Laden, whom it blames for masterminding the September 11 attacks.

It complained to the Qatari government about Al Jazeera's coverage, which also raised eyebrows among other international broadcasters.

Qatar, where the channel is based, has described the station as a "perpetual headache", although the government insists it will not close it down.

http://asia.news.yahoo.com/030326/3/umdg.html
 
Andem
Free Thinker
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Stretch

Thursday March 27, 3:06 AM
Al Jazeera TV wins award for battling censorship

LONDON (Reuters) - Al Jazeera television, which beams into 35 million Arab homes, received an award on Wednesday for its resistance of censorship.
The accolade from the British-based Index on Censorship was given for Al Jazeera's "apparent independence in a region where much of the media is state-run."

The Index on Censorship said the channel, which came to worldwide prominence after broadcasting video tapes of Osama bin Laden, has won a reputation for credible news.

"That same quality has enraged Arab governments and the United States," the Index, a group of leading media figures, writers and people concerned with freedom of speech, said in a statement.

The Golden Raspberry award for services to censorship was given to Zimbabwe's information minister Jonathan Moyo.

Al Jazeera went on air in 1996 with a $137 million budget from Qatar's Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani and has since captivated Arab viewers with talk shows on subjects considered taboo by other mostly state-run stations.

Its professional, Western-network-style bulletins and scoops on major stories have earned it the respect of its audiences but brought criticism from their conservative governments.

The station's popularity soared during the first weeks of the U.S.-led war on Afghanistan as it was the only network allowed to operate by the Taliban, who then controlled the country.

The United States has accused the channel of inflaming anti-American sentiment in the Middle East by carrying the speeches of bin Laden, whom it blames for masterminding the September 11 attacks.

It complained to the Qatari government about Al Jazeera's coverage, which also raised eyebrows among other international broadcasters.

Qatar, where the channel is based, has described the station as a "perpetual headache", although the government insists it will not close it down.

http://asia.news.yahoo.com/030326/3/umdg.html

I'm happy it's fighting censorship, and I think it would be great if a Canadian cable provider would carry it. But, do they have french or english broadcasts?

We need no more CNN. CNN is evil, it's basically the american propaganda machine, their broadcasts are filtered by the pentagon!
 
Stretch
Free Thinker
#4
10th March, 2003
PENTAGON THREATENS
TO KILL INDEPENDENT
REPORTERS IN IRAQ

The Pentagon has threatened to fire on the satellite uplink positions of independent journalists in Iraq, according to veteran BBC war correspondent, Kate Adie. In an interview with Irish radio, Ms. Adie said that questioned about the consequences of such potentially fatal actions, a senior Pentagon officer had said: "Who cares.. ..They've been warned."

According to Ms. Adie, who twelve years ago covered the last Gulf War, the Pentagon attitude is: "entirely hostile to the the free spread of information."

"I am enormously pessimistic of the chance of decent on-the-spot reporting, as the war occurs," she told Irish national broadcaster, Tom McGurk on the RTE1 Radio "Sunday Show."
Ms. Adie made the startling revelations during a discussion of media freedom issues in the likely upcoming war in Iraq. She also warned that the Pentagon is vetting journalists according to their stance on the war, and intends to take control of US journalists' satellite equipment --in order to control access to the airwaves.

Another guest on the show, war author Phillip Knightley, reported that the Pentagon has also threatened they: "may find it necessary to bomb areas in which war correspondents are attempting to report from the Iraqi side."

http://www.gulufuture.com/news/kate_adie030310.htm
 
Andem
Free Thinker
#5
Another GREAT example of "the convergence theory" which states the USA and the USSR would eventually become very similar and, at one point, identical with freedom of speech.

The theory is, that while the Soviets would slowly move to the political right, the United States would be pushed to the left, with the two meeting in the middle as Social Democrats. And from there, it is only a small step to a socialist one-world government, or the New World Order. Norman Thomas (1884-196, known as the "conscience of America," who ran for President six times as a candidate of the Socialist Party, said: "The American people will never knowingly adopt socialism. But, under the name of 'liberalism,' they will adopt every fragment of the socialist program, until one day America will be a socialist nation, without knowing how it happened." In a February 6, 1994 speech to leaders of the group United We Stand, H. Ross Perot said: "I think we may be the only great country in the world moving toward great socialism."
 
Stretch
Free Thinker
#6
Was he pushed?

Second correspondent dies
16.45PM BST, 30 Mar 2003
The Channel 4 News foreign affairs correspondent Gaby Rado has been found dead at a hotel in Suleimaniya, northern Iraq.

ITN - producers of Channel 4 News - said that there appears to be no direct connection with any military action.

It is believed that Gaby fell from the roof of the Abu Sanaa hotel into the car park below, where his body was found.

ITN journalist Terry Lloyd was killed in Iraq earlier this month after coming under fire. Two of his crew are still missing.

The Abu Sanaa hotel is being used by a number of journalists including the team from Channel 4 News.

Between 0820 and 0830 local time the security guard at the hotel car park reported that somebody had fallen from the hotel roof.

Gaby was found with serious head injuries in the hotel car park. He received immediate first aid at the scene and was then taken to the local hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Gaby's body is currently at the Forensic Hospital in Suleimaniya. The Suleimaniya police are conducting a full inquiry and are also keeping ITN informed of developments.

They have found an eyewitness who saw Gaby walking up to the hotel roof alone but did not see what happened next.

Suleimaniya is a major town in the Kurdish controlled area of northern Iraq.

Over the past few weeks Gaby had been reporting for Channel 4 News on the activities of the Kurdish fighters and coalition troops in the area.

Yesterday, those forces advanced to the outskirts of Kirkuk. The front line is more than 50 miles west of Suleimaniya and there have been no reports of fighting in the town.

ITN and Channel 4 are working to ensure that Gaby’s body is brought home as soon as possible.

Jim Gray, Editor of Channel 4 News said: "All of us are utterly distraught and our thoughts are with Gaby's family.

"Gaby was truly a unique figure in television journalism, and his reporting and analysis of some of the world's most tumultuous events was always imbued with his uniquely cultured sensibility and perception.

"He was among the most experienced in his field, and had worked on award-winning assignments for Channel 4 News chartering the transformations and conflicts throughout Eastern Europe, the Balkans, and Afghanistan.

"We loved Gaby very much and he will be deeply missed".

Stewart Purvis, ITN Chief Executive & Editor-in-Chief added: "Gaby Rado was one of the great practitioners of the intelligent, probing and sometimes sceptical journalism which is the hallmark of Channel Four News.

"His death is a tragedy for his family, friends and colleagues across the different newsrooms within ITN.

"We will make every effort to bring his body home whilst we also continue to try to recover from Basra the body of ITV News correspondent,Terry Lloyd, and to search for the missing ITV News crew members Fred Nerac and Hussein Osman".

Gaby Rado joined ITN in 1985 as a writer on the news on ITV, before moving to Channel 4 News as a reporter in 1988.

As a specialist in foreign affairs for Channel 4 News, Gaby covered most of the major international upheavals of the past decade including the conflict in Afghanistan, the fall of communism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, the war in Bosnia and the conflict in Kosovo.

Gaby was the programme’s Moscow correspondent from 1991-92. He also reported widely on the European Community.

Gaby won three prestigious Amnesty International awards and co-won an award in 1996 for a series of reports on Bosnia/Srebrenica. The same body of work contributed greatly to the BAFTA award Channel 4 News won in 1996.

Born in the Hungarian capital of Budapest, Gaby emigrated with his family to England when he was eight years old, where he attended King's College School, Wimbledon. He then read English at Christ's College, Cambridge.

His career in journalism began in 1976 when he worked as a reporter on the Kentish Times. In 1978 he moved to BBC Radio Leicester as a reporter, and then joined BBC Television in 1979 where he worked as a Sub-Editor for three years.

Gaby was 48. He met his current wife, Desa, whilst on assignment in Serbia. He had two children by his first wife, Carol Rado.


http://www.itv.com/news/1583538.html
 

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