Nigel Farage resigns as Ukip leader


Blackleaf
#1
Nigel Farage says he is standing down as leader of the UK Independence Party - for the second time.

Mr Farage said he had "done my bit" following the UK's referendum vote to leave the EU.

He said the party was in a "pretty good place" and said he would not change his mind about quitting as he did after the 2015 general election.

UKIP leader Nigel Farage stands down


BBC News
4 July 2016


Farage a short time ago announcing that he is quitting

Nigel Farage says he is standing down as leader of the UK Independence Party.

Mr Farage said he had "done my bit" following the UK's referendum vote to leave the EU.

He said the party was in a "pretty good place" and said he would not change his mind about quitting as he did after the 2015 general election.

Leading UKIP was "tough at times" but "all worth it" said Mr Farage, who is also an MEP. He added that the UK needed a "Brexit prime minister".

Mr Farage said the party would campaign against "backsliding" on the UK's exit from the EU, saying he planned to see out his term in the European Parliament - describing his party as "the turkeys that voted for Christmas".

He said he would not be backing a candidate to replace him, saying "may the best man or woman win".

Mr Farage said he would "bury the hatchet with anybody" including UKIP's sole MP Douglas Carswell, who tweeted an emoji picture of a smiley face as the leader's resignation was announced.


Ukip MP Douglas Carswell



UKIP leader Nigel Farage stands down - BBC News
 
mentalfloss
+1
#2
 
Blackleaf
+1
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

He's the victor. Job done as far as he's concerned.

He'll still be an MEP until 2018.



During his speech this morning in which he announced his resignation, Mr Farage pledged that during his remaining time in Brussels to follow the UK's Brexit negotiations "like a hawk" to ensure there is in his words "no backsliding or weakness".

And he warned the other parties to "watch this space" at the General Election in 2020 if they failed to fully implement Brexit.

The Nigel Farage story

BBC News
4 July 2016


Nigel Farage has led his party, on and off, for 10 years

Nigel Farage's slogan during his 20-year campaign to take the UK out of the European Union was "I want my country back".

Now the UKIP leader has achieved his ultimate political ambition, seemingly against all the odds. And he has turned that epithet on himself - telling reporters that he "wants his life back" and is now standing down.

The face of Euroscepticism in the UK for getting on for two decades, Mr Farage helped turn UKIP from a fringe force to the third biggest party in UK politics and helped persuade more than 17 million people to vote to leave the EU.

Few politicians have been more closely identified with the party they lead. Much of that success has been a product of Mr Farage's straight talking, everyman image, a picture editor's dream when snapped grinning with pint or cigarette (sometimes both) in hand.

His "man in the pub" image and disdain for political correctness left him free to attack rivals for being mechanical and overly on-message.

This inspired affection and respect among those who agreed with him on core messages about cutting immigration and leaving the EU.

True to his image as an outspoken saloon bar philosopher, he got into plenty of fights.


Farage stepped down as Ukip leader after the 2015 election (above) but became leader again just four days later


During the general election campaign, it was over TV debate comments he made about migrants using the NHS for expensive HIV treatment. They drew an angry rebuke from Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood, who told him: "You ought to be ashamed of yourself."

But despite widespread condemnation from opponents, reports quoted UKIP insiders saying the comments - dubbed "shock and awful" - were part of a carefully planned move to appeal to the party's base. One senior aide was quoted as saying his remarks would be welcomed by "millions and millions" of working-class voters.


Nigel Farage and the then Lib Dem leader and Deputy PM Nick Clegg went head to head in two televised debates in 2014


So how did a stockbroker's son become a mouthpiece for the disaffected working class?

Nigel Paul Farage was born on 3 April 1964 in Kent. His alcoholic father, Guy Oscar Justus Farage, walked out on the family when Nigel was five.

Yet this seemed to do little to damage the youngster's conventional upper-middle-class upbringing. Nigel attended fee-paying Dulwich College, where he developed a love of cricket, rugby and political debate.

He decided at the age of 18 not to go to university, entering the City instead.


Nigel Farage's style of campaigning marked him out from other politicians

With his gregarious, laddish ways he proved popular among clients and fellow traders on the metals exchange. Mr Farage, who started work just before the "big bang" in the City, earned a more-than-comfortable living, but had another calling - politics.

Farage factfile



Age: 52

Family: Married with two daughters to German Kirsten Mehr. Two grown-up sons with ex-wife

Education: Did not attend university after leaving fee-paying Dulwich College at 18

Career: City commodities trader from 1982, starting at London Metals Exchange

Political timeline:

1992 - Left Conservatives in protest at signing of Maastricht Treaty
1993 - Founder member of UKIP
1999 - Elected to European Parliament, representing South East England
2006 - Elected UKIP leader
2009 - Stood down to challenge Speaker John Bercow in 2010 general election
2010 - Despite failing to become an MP, won second leadership contest
2014 - Led UKIP to largest share of vote in European election
2015 - Fought Kent seat of South Thanet in general election
2016 - Helps Leave campaign to win EU referendum
2016 - Announces standing down as UKIP leader

Pastimes: Shore fishing, WW1 battlefield tours, Dad's Army, cricket, red wine


Mr Farage joined the Conservatives but became disillusioned with the way the party was going under John Major. Like many on the Eurosceptic wing, he was furious when the prime minister signed the Maastricht Treaty, stipulating an "ever-closer union" between European nations.

Mr Farage decided to break away, becoming one of the founder members of the UK Independence Party, at that time known as the Anti-Federalist League.

In his early 20s, he had the first of several brushes with death, when he was run over by a car in Orpington, Kent, after a night in the pub. He sustained severe injuries and doctors feared he would lose a leg. Grainne Hayes, his nurse, became his first wife.

He had two sons with Ms Hayes, both now grown up, and two daughters with his current wife, Kirsten Mehr, a German national he married in 1999.

Farage in quotes



"At first they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win," speaking - after Mahatma Gandhi - in April 2015 about UKIP's election chances

"It took me six hours and 15 minutes to get here... because of open-door immigration and the fact that the M4 is not as navigable as it used to be," his excuse for being late for a meeting in Wales in December 2014

"I want the EU to end but I want it to end democratically. If it doesn't end democratically I'm afraid it will end very unpleasantly," during a Euro election debate with Nick Clegg in April 2014

"I don't want to be rude... Who are you? I'd never heard of you, nobody in Europe had ever heard of you," his greeting to President of the European Council, Herman Van Rompuy, in February 2010

"As... his personal make-up artist straightened his chest hair for him, I kid you not, I realised that perhaps he might be a bit lighter weight than expected," - after Question Time with comedian Russell Brand in December 2014


Months after recovering from his road accident, Mr Farage was diagnosed with testicular cancer.

He made a full recovery, but he says the experience changed him, making him even more determined to make the most of life.

The young Farage might have had energy and enthusiasm to spare - but his early electoral forays with UKIP proved frustrating.

At the 1997 general election, it was overshadowed by the Referendum Party, backed by multimillionaire businessman Sir James Goldsmith.

But as the Referendum Party faded, UKIP started to take up some of its hardcore anti-EU support.

In 1999, it saw its first electoral breakthrough - thanks to the introduction of proportional representation for European elections, which made it easier for smaller parties to gain seats.

Mr Farage was one of three UKIP members voted in to the European Parliament, representing South East England.

The decision to take up seats in Brussels sparked one of many splits in the UKIP ranks - they were proving to be a rancorous bunch.

Mr Farage scored a publicity coup by recruiting former TV presenter and ex-Labour MP Robert Kilroy-Silk to be a candidate in the 2004 European elections, but the plan backfired when Mr Kilroy-Silk attempted to take over the party.


Nigel Farage's fight with Robert Kilroy-Silk marked a low point for the party

It was a turbulent time for UKIP but in that year's elections it had increased its number of MEPs to 12.

In 2006, Mr Farage was elected leader, replacing the less flamboyant Roger Knapman.

He was already a fierce critic of Conservative leader David Cameron, who earlier that year had described UKIP members as "fruitcakes, loonies and closet racists".

Mr Farage told the press that "nine out of 10" Tories agreed with his party's views on Europe.

Asked if UKIP was declaring war on the Conservatives, he said: "It is a war between UKIP and the entire political establishment."

The world on Farage



"We Tories look at him, with his pint and cigar and sense of humour, and instinctively recognise someone fundamentally indistinguishable from us," London Mayor Boris Johnson in 2013

"This man is not a cartoon character, he isn't Del Boy or Arthur Daley, he's a pound shop Enoch Powell and we're watching him," Russell Brand on Question Time in 2014

"He's a really, really reem guy... It means cool, wicked, sick." Reality TV star Joey Essex (above) during the 2015 election campaign

"You are either serious or a kind of Victor Meldrew on stilts. Which one are you?" Nick Clegg in 2015

"He's very outspoken - even the people who don't share his message think that he's a great speaker and fun to listen to." Timo Soini, of the eurosceptic True Finns party


At the 2009 European elections, with Mr Farage becoming a regular fixture on TV discussion programmes, UKIP got more votes than Labour and the Lib Dems, and increased its number of MEPs to 13.

But the party knew it could do little to bring about its goal of getting Britain out of the EU from Brussels and Strasbourg - and it had always performed poorly in UK domestic elections.

In an effort to change this, Mr Farage resigned as leader in 2009 to contest the Buckingham seat held by House of Commons Speaker John Bercow.

He gained widespread publicity in March 2010 - two months before the election - when he launched an attack in the European Parliament on the president of the European Council, Herman van Rompuy, accusing him of having "the charisma of a damp rag" and "the appearance of a low-grade bank clerk".

It raised Mr Farage's profile, going viral on the internet, but made little difference to his Westminster ambitions. He came third, behind Mr Bercow and an independent candidate.

Mr Farage's chosen successor as leader, Lord Pearson of Rannoch, was not suited to the cut-and-thrust of modern political debate and presentation, and UKIP polled just 3.1% nationally.

But there was a far greater personal disaster. On the day of the election a plane carrying Mr Farage crashed after its UKIP-promoting banner became entangled in the tail fin.

He was dragged from the wreckage with serious injuries.


The plane crash on polling day in 2010 left the UKIP leader with long-term injuries

After recovering in hospital, he told the London Evening Standard the experience had changed him: "I think it's made me more 'me' than I was before, to be honest. Even more fatalistic.

"Even more convinced it's not a dress rehearsal. Even more driven than I was before. And I am driven."

Mr Farage decided he wanted to become leader again and was easily voted back after Lord Pearson resigned.

His party's fortunes rose again as Europe, and particularly migration to the UK from EU countries, continued as a fast-growing political issue with the increased numbers following enlargement to include former communist states from Eastern Europe in 2004.


Mr Farage resigned in 2015 but this time says there is no chance of him coming back

Mr Farage increased UKIP's focus on the immigration impact of EU membership, referring to Britain's "open door" causing congestion on the M4, a Romanian crime wave in London and a shortage of housing, healthcare, school places and jobs for young people.

It led to repeated accusations of racism, described by Mr Farage as "grossly unfair". His strategy had long been to distance the party from the far right - its constitution bans former BNP members from joining.

Rather, he aimed to be seen as tribune for the disenfranchised, not just the older, comfortably off middle classes alienated by rapid social change caused by mass immigration, but working-class voters left behind in the hunt for jobs and seemingly ignored by the increasingly professionalised "political class".


Mr Farage's focus on immigration caused controversy but helped changed the outcome of the EU referendum

Despite facing vocal protests, including taking refuge from Scottish nationalists in one Edinburgh pub in 2013 and being chased by "diversity" activists from another in London in 2015, his efforts saw UKIP's influence increase.

After winning more than 140 English council seats at the 2013 local election - averaging 25% of the vote in the wards where it was standing - it gained 161 last year.

More significantly, the party won the UK's European election outright, gaining 27.5% of the vote. Its momentum then built when Tory defector Douglas Carswell forced a by-election to secure UKIP's first parliamentary seat, with colleague Mark Reckless following suit shortly afterwards.

While polls charted a steady decline in UKIP support through 2015, commentators noted an unusual lack of energy from its leader and questioned whether he was fit for the fight.


Mr Farage has said he will remain as an MEP in Brussels to ensure there is no "backsliding" on Brexit

It prompted Mr Farage to reveal he'd been in "a great deal of pain" at the start of the campaign, having neglected a chronic back condition caused by his plane crash. Despite physiotherapy helping his energy levels return, he never made the impact some thought he might.

Comments ahead of polling day that UKIP was "about a lot more than me", and that he was "a complete convert" to proportional representation, hinted that he believed the game was up.

Despite gaining 13% of the vote at the general election, with nearly four million people casting a ballot for the party, they only managed to return one MP, Douglas Carswell, with Mark Reckless losing his seat.

Mr Farage failed in his bid to win South Thanet, losing out by 3,000 votes to the Conservatives.

Having said during the campaign that he he would be "for the chop" if he didn't win, he duly announced his resignation as party leader on the morning after polling day.

However, he left the door open for a possible return by saying he might stand in the leadership contest after he had had the summer off.

Big figure

Then he surprised some in the party by announcing that he had changed his mind after being "persuaded" by "overwhelming" evidence from UKIP members that they wanted him to remain leader - insisting that he wanted to stick around for the referendum battle ahead.

That decision was vindicated, with Mr Farage playing a key role in the bruising campaign that followed despite being shunned by many Conservatives on the same side of the argument.

His focus on immigration was not to everyone's likening - a UKIP poster featuring a line of refugees with the words 'Breaking Point' caused widespread anger - but the fact that it became a defining issue in the campaign was in no small measure down to him.

The UKIP leader was the first to celebrate victory with an emotional speech in the early hours of the morning - before the sensational result had been declared.

Now after his latest resignation Mr Farage, who has fallen out with a number of colleagues over the years including Godfrey Bloom, Suzanne Evans and Douglas Carswell, has insisted he will not be coming back and has promised to give whoever succeeds him his full support.

However, he will remain a big figure in the party and has pledged during his remaining time in Brussels to follow the UK's Brexit's negotiations "like a hawk" to ensure there is in his words "no backsliding or weakness".

And he warned the other parties to "watch this space" at the General Election in 2020 if they failed to fully implement Brexit.


The Nigel Farage story - BBC News
Last edited by Blackleaf; Jul 4th, 2016 at 08:29 AM..
 
MHz
+1
#4
A knowledgeable public and referendum votes is the next best thing to a great leader that puts the care of the lowest members of society as being more important that seeing how much luxury a few can have at the expense of the majority of the 'public'. ('public' does not have off-shoots like 'the elite')
 
Blackleaf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

A knowledgeable public and referendum votes is the next best thing to a great leader that puts the care of the lowest members of society as being more important that seeing how much luxury a few can have at the expense of the majority of the 'public'. ('public' does not have off-shoots like 'the elite')

Farage's resignation is good for Ukip.

Our third-most popular party (after Tories and Labour) can now get a new leader - someone like Steven Woolfe (one of the three Ukip MEPs for here, the North West of England), Paul Nuttall (deputy leader and another of Ukip's MEPs for North West England) or Suzanne Evans - that will reach out to those angry and disilliusioned Labour voters, many of which voted Leave. Ukip now have a great opportunity to increase their popularity even more and win a lot more seats at the 2020 General Election.



 
Dexter Sinister
No Party Affiliation
+3 / -1
#6  Top Rated Post
Job done? The job's just beginning and the two guys most responsible for creating this chaos and uncertainty are refusing to take any responsibility for following through. Wankers and cowards in my judgement.
 
Blackleaf
+2
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter Sinister View Post

Job done? The job's just beginning and the two guys most responsible for creating this chaos and uncertainty are refusing to take any responsibility for following through. Wankers and cowards in my judgement.

What chaos?

As for Boris, he didn't run. He was knifed in the back by Gove.

Mr Farage is the greatest British politician today, who took on not only the British Establishment but the Global Establishment and won.

He's the man who fought hard for twenty years to set Britain free from the shackles of the EU when the Establishment politicians were trying to sell Britain down the river and he achieved it.

A lordship and a statue outside Westminster Palace should be his rewards.
 
Kreskin
+1 / -1
#8
He has a PhD in Quitting!
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
+2
#9
I just find it funny that those involved with Leave - the leaders - are jumping ship. It's like they realized "Holy K-RAP, we really gotta DO this?!?! I'm out!"

Then again I also think the same of Cameron since this was his doing too, the dumbazz.
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Mr Farage has said he will remain as an MEP in Brussels to ensure there is no "backsliding" on Brexit



I'm sure that is the reason.. now that most UK citizens have lost their retirement savings and nothing will change.. The UK wants to trade with the EU, they will still have to allow immigrants in, and abide by EU rules.
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#11
One thing I found interesting is lawyers are getting involved in the Brexit thing. Pushing to make sure Parliament holds a discussion/debate and vote on it, because not doing so is against the UK constitution apparently.

So... considering most of the members are for Remain... should lead to interesting debating.
 
Corduroy
+1
#12
Shouldn't UKIP just dissolve now?
 
mentalfloss
#13
No, they need to stay on!

Nigel's job is over but their job has just begun!


I know.

It makes absolutely no sense to me either.
 
Corduroy
#14
I guess there's still more UNION left for UKIP to destroy. They can start with the U in their name. The United Kingdom Independence Party needs to become that England Independence Party.
 
Dexter Sinister
No Party Affiliation
+2
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

One thing I found interesting is lawyers are getting involved in the Brexit thing. Pushing to make sure Parliament holds a discussion/debate and vote on it, because not doing so is against the UK constitution apparently.

The UK has no formal written constitution, though certain statutes, like the various Acts of Union that created it in the first place, certainly have the force of constitutional documents. But even absent a formal constitution, the principle of the supremacy of Parliament is clear. There are many things a government cannot do without the consent of Parliament, and I'm sure that entering into or abandoning international agreements are among them. Normally with a parliamentary majority it would be pretty much automatic, but I don't think that would happen in this case. Parliament cannot be bound by a referendum, it would view the result as just an advisory opinion and it's free to reject the advice.

And if it does, just watch the pro-Brexit folks shriek in righteous indignation because they don't understand how their parliamentary system works.
 
Machjo
#16
He's a smoker?

'I want my lungs back!'
 
Corduroy
#17
Lungxit?
 
Machjo
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Corduroy View Post

Lungxit?

Lungstraction? Lungxodus?

Doesn't sound healthy by any name.
 
Corduroy
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Machjo View Post

Lungstraction? Lungxodus?

Doesn't sound healthy by any name.

Lungectomy? There's probably another word for that...

*pneumonectomy
 
Machjo
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Corduroy View Post

Lungectomy? There's probably another word for that...

*pneumonectomy

Ouch!

Britanectomy... Or if Scotland and Northern Ireland stay in the EU, Anglectomy.
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Dexter Sinister View Post

The UK has no formal written constitution, though certain statutes, like the various Acts of Union that created it in the first place, certainly have the force of constitutional documents. But even absent a formal constitution, the principle of the supremacy of Parliament is clear. There are many things a government cannot do without the consent of Parliament, and I'm sure that entering into or abandoning international agreements are among them. Normally with a parliamentary majority it would be pretty much automatic, but I don't think that would happen in this case. Parliament cannot be bound by a referendum, it would view the result as just an advisory opinion and it's free to reject the advice.

And if it does, just watch the pro-Brexit folks shriek in righteous indignation because they don't understand how their parliamentary system works.

Maybe that's what the writer of the article I read meant. It was early this am so not sure.

Agree with you otherwise and honestly waiting to hear Blackie's view on it.
 
Blackleaf
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

now that most UK citizens have lost their retirement savings

Where's your evidence for this?

Quote:

The UK wants to trade with the EU, they will still have to allow immigrants in, and abide by EU rules.

Canada has just forged a trade deal with the EU. Does Canada have to allow immigrants in and abide by EU rules?

Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

One thing I found interesting is lawyers are getting involved in the Brexit thing. Pushing to make sure Parliament holds a discussion/debate and vote on it, because not doing so is against the UK constitution apparently.

So... considering most of the members are for Remain... should lead to interesting debating.

What I would find interesting would be the response of the public should parliament do the politically suicidal thing and ignore the will of the people.

Coffee House

In praise of Nigel Farage

Rod Liddle





Nigel Farage working on his resignation speech. One coffee, three packets of cigarettes.

Rod Liddle
4 July 2016
The Spectator

Nigel Farage is the most important British politician of the last decade and the most successful. His resignation leaves a hole in our political system. With enormous intelligence and chutzpah and a refreshingly unorthodox approach, he built Ukip up from nothing to become established as our third largest party and succeeded in his overriding ambition – to see the UK vote to leave the European Union. He is also extremely good company and likeable – unless you are one of those infants who screams ‘fascist!’ whenever his name is raised. Or if you are BBC PM’s presenter Eddie Mair, who – fatuously enough – seemed to suggest Farage was to blame for racist assaults taking place in the country.

What happens now to Ukip? Just look at those votes it already has, and the legion upon legion more waiting in the dispossessed Labour heartlands of the North and the Midlands. The party now should surely aim itself squarely at Labour, at the people who voted 65-35 to Leave and whose MPs voted resolutely to Remain. Paul Nuttall is the best placed of its current leaders to attract that vote, I think. The political arena is changing beyond recognition; Labour is now the party for the affluent middle-class left. A canny campaign from Ukip could see it wiped out, north of the Wash – much as has happened in Scotland.


Ukip's Scouse deputy leader Paul Nuttall, a Ukip MEP for North West England, could become the party's new leader, the man to take the party to new heights

UKIP Local Manifesto 2016: https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/ukipdev/pages/3440/attachments/original/1459984864/UKIP_Local_Manifesto_2016.pdf?1459984864


In praise of Nigel Farage | Coffee House

Farage's resignation speech in full


Farage during his resignation speech yesterday


"I am aware that not everybody in this country is happy. Indeed, lot of young people have been wound up by scare stories and are actually very angry, and very scared about their future.

It’s an irony, really, that it’s the youth of the country that appear to be worried. Right across the European Union, it’s the under 30s that are protesting in the streets against undemocratic centralised control and, indeed, against the Euro and pretty much anything that emanates from Brussels.

In time, I hope that some of these sharp divisions can be healed when people come to realise that, actually, life outside the European Union is really very exciting and we’ve got a much better, brighter future being in charge of our own lives. Certainly the stock markets, despite everything George Osborne told us, have rallied very strongly. FTSE is now about 14 per cent higher than it was during its February lows.

It is a delight to see the number of Commonwealth countries rushing forward in a bidding war to be the first people to sign a trade agreement with an independent UK. What the country needs is strong leadership, what it needs is direction, what it needs is not business as usual. I am certain of one thing, the UK will leave the European Union, we have won that, and in terms of our Parliament, our courts, that is a great historic victory. What I am less certain of, is what deal is this government going to cut?

We need a new Prime Minister that puts down some pretty clear red lines, that we’re not going to give in on issues like free movement, and a Prime Minister who is not going to sell us out to what is known as the single market, but what is effectively a big business protectionist cartel. So we need a vision from our new leader, a vision that shows that we are going to engage with the world, that turns us into an enterprise economy.

To do that, to achieve that, we need a team of negotiators that includes figures from across the political spectrum which reflects that Brexit vote , and crucially, we need some business people, who know not only how the world works, but understand the importance of lobbying industry directly. We need to be lobbying the German car industry and the French wine producers, because next year both France and Germany have General Elections.

It is pressure on Merkel, it is pressure on Hollande from within those countries that is likely to get us the best possible deal. And we need to go global, there is no reason to wait for this, at all. As soon as we get a new Prime Minister, we need teams of negotiators. I’m told that we haven’t got the skill! I’m told that we haven’t got the competence or the expertise within our own civil service, which I suppose is the price you pay when you give away the ability to run your own country. So, let’s headhunt them. Let’s get them in from Singapore, or South Korea, or Chile, or Switzerland, or any of these countries who’ve managed to achieve far more in terms of global trade deals than we have as part of the European Union.

So we are now in charge of our own future, and I want us to grab this opportunity with both hands. Now, one of the questions that is being asked is: what of UKIP? What is the future of UKIP after this result? Well, we have clearly established ourselves as the third political force in this country, and this year we’ve extended our elected representation to the Welsh Assembly and the London Assembly. There is no doubt that without us, without the growth in UKIP, there would not have been a referendum. There is also no doubt, that when it came to the ground campaign in this referendum, it was the people’s army of UKIP who were out there delivering the leaflets, putting out the posters and doing all that work that needed, desperately, to be done. I do believe myself that it was UKIP, and UKIP’s messages, that inspired non-voters to go out there and make the difference. Without UKIP there is no way that the Leave vote would ever have got over the line.

So UKIP needs to be strong. We need to be strong, and push, and try and make sure that this country gets the best possible terms. And in electoral terms, the party now has built up a very loyal following of people, who want to go out and vote UKIP at every given opportunity. And they see us, our voters, they see us as being the one party that’s actually prepared to stand up for ordinary, decent people. I feel that the deeper the crisis in the Labour Party becomes, and there’s certainly no signs of that going away, and the further that the PLP and the leadership get away from their own voters, I feel that’s perhaps where our greatest potential lies. UKIP right now is in a very sound financial position.

I do believe we need some reform of its management structures. There is further professionalism that needs to be done, but the party is in a pretty good place, certainly compared to all of the others. If we do not get, if we do not get, a satisfactory Brexit deal – that allied to the woes of the Labour Party, to the groundswell of support that is there amongst UKIP loyalists – if we don’t get a good Brexit deal, then in 2020, watch this space.

The other subject of speculation has been ‘what am I going to do’? All I can say is, on this long journey, is a great thanks to anybody who has helped me on this journey, a great number of whom are in this room right now. It has been a very long journey. Not at every stage of the way an easy one, although it has been tremendous fun. When I think back to when I first stood for UKIP, in fact when I first stood for anybody, in the Eastleigh by-election which took place in 1994, and I managed to scrape past Screaming Lord Sutch, by a massive 164 votes, and to have gone from that to being part of a national campaign that attracted 17.5 million votes for Brexit says to me that, tough though it has been at times, it has certainly all been worth it. I came into politics from business because I believed that this nation should be self- governing.

I have never been, and I have never wanted to be, a career politician! My aim in being in politics was to get Britain out of the European Union. That is what we voted for in that referendum two weeks ago, and that is why I now feel that I have done my bit, that I couldn’t possibly achieve more than we managed to get in that referendum, and so I feel that it is right that I should now stand aside as leader of UKIP.

I will continue to support the party. I will support the new leader. I will watch the renegotiation process in Brussels like a hawk, and perhaps comment in the European Parliament from time to time. I am also very keen to help the independence movements that are springing up in other parts of the European Union because I am certain of one thing, you haven’t seen the last country that wants to leave the EU. It has been a huge chunk of my life, doing this, and it is not easy, perhaps, when you feel a degree of ownership of something to let it go. But it does come, as I say, at a cost. It has come at a cost to me and perhaps to those around me. During the referendum campaign I said I want my country back’. What I’m saying today is ‘I want my life back’, and it begins right now.

Thank you."



Nigel Farage resigns: The Ukip leader's resignation speech in full | UK Politics | News | The Independent
Last edited by Blackleaf; Jul 5th, 2016 at 09:02 AM..
 
Kreskin
#23
The two top dogs in the leave camp are out and the process hasn't even started. Is there the political will to follow it through?
 
Blackleaf
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Kreskin View Post

The two top dogs in the leave camp are out and the process hasn't even started.

Johnson was stabbed in the back by Gove in the Tory leadership race.

Farage will still be an MEP until 2018 and will likely be part of the new PM's Brexit negotiations team.


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Is there the political will to follow it through?

There has to be. The people have spoken and the people expect them to get on with it once the new Tory leader and PM is elected.

Vote Leave's Andrea Leadsom has said that if she becomes the new PM on 9th September then she will trigger Article 50 as soon as possible.
 
Kreskin
#25
In a Parliamentary system there doesn't have to be.
 
Blackleaf
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Kreskin View Post

In a Parliamentary system there doesn't have to be.

Sorry, but Leave won and Remain lost.

Many, or most, of the 17,410,742 people who voted Leave - more people than have ever voted for anything in British history - are white working class voters who are fed up of the out-of-touch London elite ignoring them. If this elite ignores these 17.4 million once again by keeping them in the EU against there will then I predict not only political carnage in the next general election in 2020 but carnage on the streets and mass civil unrest.

And during his resignation speech yesterday Farage warned rival political parties to "Watch this space in 2020" if they do not fully implement Brexit.

There will he hell to pay if Brexit isn't followed through.
 
Machjo
#27
Garage is delusional. NAFTA limits the degree Canada could break down non-tariff barriers to trade. He seems to think tariffs are all there is to it. What about standardising banking and other rules, eh Farage?

Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Sorry, but Leave won and Remain lost.

Many, or most, of the 17,410,742 people who voted Leave - more people than have ever voted for anything in British history - are white working class voters who are fed up of the out-of-touch London elite ignoring them. If this elite ignores these 17.4 million once again by keeping them in the EU against there will then I predict not only political carnage in the next general election in 2020 but carnage on the streets and mass civil unrest.

And during his resignation speech yesterday Farage warned rival political parties to "Watch this space in 2020" if they do not fully implement Brexit.

There will he hell to pay if Brexit isn't followed through.

I don't disagree. Leaving is preferable to violence.

Maybe the UK needs to leave for a while just to see how good things are in the EU.
 
Kreskin
+1
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Sorry, but Leave won and Remain lost.

Many, or most, of the 17,410,742 people who voted Leave - more people than have ever voted for anything in British history - are white working class voters who are fed up of the out-of-touch London elite ignoring them. If this elite ignores these 17.4 million once again by keeping them in the EU against there will then I predict not only political carnage in the next general election in 2020 but carnage on the streets and mass civil unrest.

And during his resignation speech yesterday Farage warned rival political parties to "Watch this space in 2020" if they do not fully implement Brexit.

There will he hell to pay if Brexit isn't followed through.

They won a non-binding referendum. Your parliament still needs to make a decision, and the leaders of the leave side are running for their own exits. Seems like an odd situation.
 
Machjo
#29
Just to add, Canada's trade deal with the EU is primitive compared to EU membership. It reduces barriers, yes, but mostly limited to goods. How would this help the UK's financial services exports for example? Or even most services?
 
Blackleaf
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Kreskin View Post

They won a non-binding referendum.

So? The decision will stand. If it doesn't, expect Ukip to he elected to power in 2020.

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Your parliament still needs to make a decision

No, it doesn't. The British people have already made the decision for them.
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and the leaders of the leave side are running for their own exits.

No, they aren't.

Quote: Originally Posted by Machjo View Post

Maybe the UK needs to leave for a while just to see how good things are in the EU.

Things aren't good in the EU. The mass unemployment and economic turmoil amongst many of its member states is proof of that. And so is the fact that most EU citizens want out of the EU.