Controversy over England blind cricket team's victory over Australia


Blackleaf
#1
The Australians are quick to brand the British, or "Poms" as they call them, "whingeing Poms" over the stereotype, amongst Australians, that the British like to complain over the slightest things, especially when the Australians beat us in the rugby or cricket.

But in recent years it's the Australians themselves who deserve to be called "whingers" after their complaints when England beat Australia in the 2003 Rugby World Cup Final, when the England cricket team beat Australia to win the Ashes in 2005 and when Great Britain finished above Australia in the Beijing Olympics medals table.

Now the Aussies are proving themselves to be sore losers again, when the English blind cricket team beat their Australian counterparts.

England romped to a 3-0 series victory over Australia, leading Australia to complain - wrongly - that one England player has better eyesight than he admits.

The all-rounder Nathan Foy scored 100 runs in the second match, helping England to a total of 324 runs and a 54-run victory.

The World Blind Cricket Council has taken England's side in the dispute.

When it comes to sport, especially cricket and rugby, there is no bigger rivalry than that between the English and the Australians.

Let's hope this is a good omen as the 2009 Ashes series approaches..


Controversy over England blind cricket team's victory over Australia

A victory for England's blind cricket team over their Australian counterparts has led to accusations that the team's star player has better eyesight than is admitted.


By Alastair Jamieson
17 Dec 2008
The Telegraph



Blind English all-rounder Nathan Foy
Photo: GETTY




The row comes after England beat Australia in the Blind Ashes in a comprehensive 3-0 series victory of the kind that has eluded the main squad.

The Australian Blind Cricket Council is considering a complaint about English all-rounder Nathan Foy amid accusations from a fan that his sight is not as badly impaired as is claimed.

Foy helped his team to defeat Australia when he scored 100 runs in the second game last Sunday. Because he is classified as having the most serious of three gradings of visual impairment in blind cricket, Foy's score was doubled to 200, giving England 324 runs in all and a 54-run win.

Sydney magistrate Christine Haskett, whose nephew Mark Haskett is a member of the Australian team, said she watched play as Foy entered and left the field unassisted, threw the ball accurately during fielding and hit the ball repeatedly while batting.

"Our concern is that the English side appears to have an unfair advantage," Ms Haskett told The Australian.

The newspaper said two Australian blind cricketers wanted to lodge a protest against Foy but were prevented from doing so by team managers.

The accusation will enliven the traditional rivalry between the cricketing nations, especially as it reverses the familiar claim from Australians that England fans are 'whingeing poms'.

The World Blind Cricket Council weighed in on England's side, saying it was disappointed Australia had questioned Foy's qualifications.

Senior Vice President Peter Donovan said the crowd should enjoy watching a talented player instead of questioning the level of his blindness.

"When someone is above average, people look for ways of trying to justify why they're not the same as everybody else," he said.

"I think that's why it's come about. Nathan has exceptional talent so the fact that he performs so well, I think people just think 'oh well he can't be blind'."

The Australian Blind Cricket Council was unavailable for comment.

A spokesman for the England Cricket Board said it had not had any contact from the Australian Blind Cricket Council about the issue. He said: "We are simply delighted that England have won the Blind Ashes for the second time and that an English batsman has scored a double century."

England fans will hope the victory could be an omen for Kevin Petersen's Test side as it prepares for the 2009 Ashes series next summer.

telegraph.co.uk
Last edited by Blackleaf; Dec 17th, 2008 at 01:37 PM..
 
Praxius
#2
Hey don't hate the playa, hate the game.

If the game doesn't seem fair, don't participate.
 
SirJosephPorter
#3
I donít understand, how do the blind play cricket? The batsman cannot see the ball to hit it properly, the fielder doesnít know where the ball has gone, when the batsmen are executing the run, they donít know if they properly completed the run (by placing the bat beyond the crease), a fielder cannot take a catch (because he cannot see the ball coming) to get the batsman out.

The whole game would be meaningless if one cannot see. Exactly how do the blind play the game? Or is this a joke thread?
 
Risus
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

I donít understand, how do the blind play cricket? The batsman cannot see the ball to hit it properly, the fielder doesnít know where the ball has gone, when the batsmen are executing the run, they donít know if they properly completed the run (by placing the bat beyond the crease), a fielder cannot take a catch (because he cannot see the ball coming) to get the batsman out.

The whole game would be meaningless if one cannot see. Exactly how do the blind play the game? Or is this a joke thread?

That is a prejudiced statement against the blind...
There is a blind baseball league: http://www.nbba.org/
I've seen them play. It is quite interesting.
There is also a hockey league for blind players.

I bet some of them can play better than you...
 
SirJosephPorter
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Risus View Post


I bet some of them can play better than you...

I donít doubt that, Risus, and it wasnít a prejudicial statement, I am curious to know. How does one play cricket or baseball or whatever if one cannot see the ball. I can understand them playing chess, or bridge (with specially constructed Braille cards) etc. But how does one play a sport involving a ball, if one cannot see the ball?
 
Risus
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

I donít doubt that, Risus, and it wasnít a prejudicial statement, I am curious to know. How does one play cricket or baseball or whatever if one cannot see the ball. I can understand them playing chess, or bridge (with specially constructed Braille cards) etc. But how does one play a sport involving a ball, if one cannot see the ball?

It was a prejudicial statement, thinking that the thread was a joke.
If you went to the link I posted and did a bit of searching, you would be able to figure it all out...