Scientists, tribe study shrinking Washington state glacier


spaminator
#1
Scientists, tribe study shrinking Washington state glacier
Phuong Le, The Associated Press
First posted: Friday, August 28, 2015 01:15 PM EDT | Updated: Friday, August 28, 2015 01:38 PM EDT
MOUNT BAKER, Wash. -- Mauri Pelto digs his crampons into the steep icy slope on Mount Baker in the northwestern state of Washington and watches as streams of water cascade off the thick mass of bare, bluish ice. The water carves vertical channels in the face of the glacier as it rushes downstream.
What little snow from last winter is already gone, so ice is melting off the glacier at a rate of nearly three inches a day this summer, he said.
"At the rate it's losing mass, it won't make it 50 years," said Pelto, a glaciologist who returned this month for the 32nd year to study glaciers in the North Cascades range. "This is a dying glacier," he said.
Glaciers on Mount Baker and other mountains in the North Cascades are thinning and retreating. Seven have disappeared over the past three decades, and the overall volume of glaciers in the range have lost about one-fifth of their volume.
The shrinking glaciers here mirror what is happening around the U.S. and worldwide: As the planet warms, glaciers are losing volume, some faster than others.
Two of the largest glaciers in Yosemite National Park in California have retreated over the past century, losing about two-thirds of their surface areas. In Alaska, a recent study of 116 glaciers estimated they have lost about 75 billion metric tons of ice every year from 1994 to 2013. In Montana, scientists are already seeing the impacts in increased stream temperature and changes to high-elevation ecosystems. In 1850, there were 150 glaciers at Glacier National Park; now there are 25.
"These glaciers are, from a geological standpoint, rapidly disappearing from the landscape," said Dan Fagre, a research ecologist with U.S. Geological Survey stationed in Glacier National Park. "They're so small and vulnerable that they could be gone in a matter of decades."
Glaciers -- thick masses of accumulated snow that compress into ice and move -- are important indicators of climate change because they are driven by precipitation and temperature.
The glaciers on Mount Baker, a volcanic peak northwest of Seattle, provide a critical water source for agriculture, cities and tribes during the late summer. The icy glacial melt keeps streams cool for fish and replenishes rivers during a time of year when they typically run low.
For the Nooksack Indian Tribe, which has relied for hundreds of years on salmon runs in the glacier-fed Nooksack River, a way of life is at risk. Without that glacial runoff, rivers will dry up more quickly and warm up faster, making it harder for salmon to spawn or migrate to the ocean.
"Climate change will impact the ability of tribal members to harvest fish in the future," said Oliver Grah, water resources manager for the tribe, which has teamed up with Pelto. They want to know how glacier runoff will affect the river's hydrology and ultimately fish habitat and restoration planning.
On a recent day in August, Grah and colleague Jezra Beaulieu hiked 5 miles into the Sholes Glacier to study how climate change will influence the timing and magnitude of stream flow in the river. It's their fifth field trip to the glacier this summer, and each time they're amazed at how rapidly the snow and ice are melting.
Grah strings a measuring tape across the stream, wades in shin-deep in the fast-moving, brownish water and measures the depth of the water streaming from the toe of the glacier. He calls out numbers that Beaulieu records in a yellow notebook. They're trying to calculate how much flow and sediment is coming from the glacier.
"This is a frozen reservoir that yields water all summer long," said Pelto, a professor of environmental sciences at Nichols College in Dudley, Massachusetts. "So you take this away and what are you going to replace it with?"
Scientists, tribe study shrinking Washington state glacier | World | News | Toro
 
Curious Cdn
#2
Oh, no, no, no. There is already a thread talking about this and the experts over there say that alpine glaciers disappearing will have no effect. The water for those Salmon rivers will come from ...elsewhere ...

The water levels won't go down because water will appear from ... elsewhere ... somewhere.
 
pgs
+1
#3  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

Scientists, tribe study shrinking Washington state glacier
Phuong Le, The Associated Press
First posted: Friday, August 28, 2015 01:15 PM EDT | Updated: Friday, August 28, 2015 01:38 PM EDT
MOUNT BAKER, Wash. -- Mauri Pelto digs his crampons into the steep icy slope on Mount Baker in the northwestern state of Washington and watches as streams of water cascade off the thick mass of bare, bluish ice. The water carves vertical channels in the face of the glacier as it rushes downstream.
What little snow from last winter is already gone, so ice is melting off the glacier at a rate of nearly three inches a day this summer, he said.
"At the rate it's losing mass, it won't make it 50 years," said Pelto, a glaciologist who returned this month for the 32nd year to study glaciers in the North Cascades range. "This is a dying glacier," he said.
Glaciers on Mount Baker and other mountains in the North Cascades are thinning and retreating. Seven have disappeared over the past three decades, and the overall volume of glaciers in the range have lost about one-fifth of their volume.
The shrinking glaciers here mirror what is happening around the U.S. and worldwide: As the planet warms, glaciers are losing volume, some faster than others.
Two of the largest glaciers in Yosemite National Park in California have retreated over the past century, losing about two-thirds of their surface areas. In Alaska, a recent study of 116 glaciers estimated they have lost about 75 billion metric tons of ice every year from 1994 to 2013. In Montana, scientists are already seeing the impacts in increased stream temperature and changes to high-elevation ecosystems. In 1850, there were 150 glaciers at Glacier National Park; now there are 25.
"These glaciers are, from a geological standpoint, rapidly disappearing from the landscape," said Dan Fagre, a research ecologist with U.S. Geological Survey stationed in Glacier National Park. "They're so small and vulnerable that they could be gone in a matter of decades."
Glaciers -- thick masses of accumulated snow that compress into ice and move -- are important indicators of climate change because they are driven by precipitation and temperature.
The glaciers on Mount Baker, a volcanic peak northwest of Seattle, provide a critical water source for agriculture, cities and tribes during the late summer. The icy glacial melt keeps streams cool for fish and replenishes rivers during a time of year when they typically run low.
For the Nooksack Indian Tribe, which has relied for hundreds of years on salmon runs in the glacier-fed Nooksack River, a way of life is at risk. Without that glacial runoff, rivers will dry up more quickly and warm up faster, making it harder for salmon to spawn or migrate to the ocean.
"Climate change will impact the ability of tribal members to harvest fish in the future," said Oliver Grah, water resources manager for the tribe, which has teamed up with Pelto. They want to know how glacier runoff will affect the river's hydrology and ultimately fish habitat and restoration planning.
On a recent day in August, Grah and colleague Jezra Beaulieu hiked 5 miles into the Sholes Glacier to study how climate change will influence the timing and magnitude of stream flow in the river. It's their fifth field trip to the glacier this summer, and each time they're amazed at how rapidly the snow and ice are melting.
Grah strings a measuring tape across the stream, wades in shin-deep in the fast-moving, brownish water and measures the depth of the water streaming from the toe of the glacier. He calls out numbers that Beaulieu records in a yellow notebook. They're trying to calculate how much flow and sediment is coming from the glacier.
"This is a frozen reservoir that yields water all summer long," said Pelto, a professor of environmental sciences at Nichols College in Dudley, Massachusetts. "So you take this away and what are you going to replace it with?"
Scientists, tribe study shrinking Washington state glacier | World | News | Toro

If Mt. Baker blows it's top every 500 years on average , how old is that glacier ?
 
petros
+1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Oh, no, no, no. There is already a thread talking about this and the experts over there say that alpine glaciers disappearing will have no effect. The water for those Salmon rivers will come from ...elsewhere ...

The water levels won't go down because water will appear from ... elsewhere ... somewhere.

Elsewhere and somewhere are the sky. Why can't you accept the fact it rains and snows? It confirms you are an idiot and forces you to admit you are wrong?

Quote:

For the Nooksack Indian Tribe, which has relied for hundreds of years on salmon runs in the glacier-fed Nooksack River, a way of life is at risk. Without that glacial runoff, rivers will dry up more quickly and warm up faster, making it harder for salmon to spawn or migrate to the ocean

.


With an average annual rainfall of 37.41 inches, the state of Washington gets 1.8 less inches of rain than the national average (39.17 inches)

Nooksack has had an average rainfall of 35.83 inches over the last 30 years, which is 3.34 inches inches less than fthe average nationwide, and about average in Washington.

1/2 a fathom of rain...

Oh and by the way. 1 inch of rain = 10 inches of snow.
 
pgs
+1
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Elsewhere and somewhere are the sky. Why can't you accept the fact it rains and snows? It confirms you are an idiot and forces you to admit you are wrong?

.


With an average annual rainfall of 37.41 inches, the state of Washington gets 1.8 less inches of rain than the national average (39.17 inches)

Nooksack has had an average rainfall of 35.83 inches over the last 30 years, which is 3.34 inches inches less than fthe average nationwide, and about average in Washington.

1/2 a fathom of rain...

Oh and by the way. 1 inch of rain = 10 inches of snow.

Is that a fresh water fathom or a salt water fathom ?
 
petros
#6
If it's rain it's....
 
pgs
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

If it's rain it's....

Never mind . But isn't the rain sucked out of the ocean ?
 
petros
#8
It leaves the salt behind.
 
captain morgan
#9
Funny how 'the scientists and tribe' forget to mention that Mount Baker is volcanic.

Anyone that has skied there will have noticed a couple of mud bogs on those runs where the heat has pushed through
 
petros
#10
Decent skiing if if isn't raining or snowing hard.
 
captain morgan
+1
#11
Yeah, not too bad at all... My only beef with the resorts on the coast has to do with the water content in the snow.
 
petros
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Yeah, not too bad at all... My only beef with the resorts on the coast has to do with the water content in the snow.

I like the dry snow of the Rockies and interior.
 
taxslave
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Yeah, not too bad at all... My only beef with the resorts on the coast has to do with the water content in the snow.

It is known as the wet coast. Although Washington is fairly dry.
 
Curious Cdn
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Elsewhere and somewhere are the sky. Why can't you accept the fact it rains and snows? It confirms you are an idiot and forces you to admit you are wrong?

.


.

I don't know why I bother answering insulting trolls like you but here it goes for the umpteenth time, thicko (petros head)

Yes, it rains. It snows. They also have water flowing in their rivers that had accumulated over many years that was stored in a growing glacier and is now being released pretty much all at once. So, when we see those fast following salmon rivers, we are watching the rain, the melting snow pack AND an ancient supply of frozen water that is right now, being quickly released into the rivers until the glaciers are gone. Then, you will just have the rain and snow and no more "legacy" water from the glacier that was stored away back when.


Am I going too quickly for you? Have you read the above article, because it says the same thing? I guess that they haven't admitted that they are wrong yet, either.

Petros right.

Everybody else stoopid.
 
taxslave
+1
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I don't know why I bother answering insulting trolls like you but here it goes for the umpteenth time, thicko (petros head)

Yes, it rains. It snows. They also have water flowing in their rivers that had accumulated over many years that was stored in a growing glacier and is now being released pretty much all at once. So, when we see those fast following salmon rivers, we are watching the rain, the melting snow pack AND an ancient supply of frozen water that is right now, being quickly released into the rivers until the glaciers are gone. Then, you will just have the rain and snow and no more "legacy" water from the glacier that was stored away back when.


Am I going too quickly for you? Have you read the above article, because it says the same thing? I guess that they haven't admitted that they are wrong yet, either.

Petros right.

Everybody else stoopid.

Better educate yourself a little more instead of just parroting the globull warming party line.
 
Curious Cdn
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Better educate yourself a little more instead of just parroting the globull warming party line.

Where did I say Global Warming?

The feckin' glacier is getting smaller as is every other glacier in North America. It is not a political statement.
 
petros
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Petros right.

Everybody else stoopid.

Bingo!!!