Ontario MPP leaves Tory caucus over decisions affecting francophones


spaminator
#1
Ontario MPP leaves Tory caucus over decisions affecting francophones
Canadian Press
Published:
November 29, 2018
Updated:
November 29, 2018 2:07 PM EST
Tory MPP Amanda Simard addressed spoke to media at St. Isidore Recreation Centre about the proposed cuts to francophone institutions, Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018. (Ashley Fraser/Postmedia)
A Progressive Conservative legislator who publicly denounced Ontario’s decision to eliminate the independent office of the French-language services commissioner and a planned French-language university has left the Tory caucus.
In a letter to the Speaker of the legislature, Amanda Simard says her decision is effective immediately, and she will remain as an independent.
“I am no longer a member of the Progressive Conservative Caucus,” Simard wrote in the short letter sent Thursday. “I will continue to take my place in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario as an Independent.”
The rookie legislator, who represents a largely Franco-Ontarian riding, broke ranks with Premier Doug Ford’s government over the two controversial decisions affecting about 600,000 francophones in the province.
Ontario Attorney General Caroline Mulroney, left, looks on as Ontario Premier Doug Ford speaks to media following his meeting with Quebec Premier Francois Legault at Queens Park in Toronto on Nov. 19, 2018. (The Canadian Press)
Simard said Wednesday that she was not satisfied by the government’s announcement late last week that it would create a commissioner position within the office of the provincial ombudsman, establish a Ministry of Francophone Affairs, and hire a senior policy adviser on francophone affairs in the premier’s office.
She said the “partial backtracking” was not enough.
Ford has said the measures regarding the commissioner and the university announced in the fall economic statement were necessary to bring down the province’s deficit, although he has not said how much would be saved.
He defended the moves again in the legislature Thursday, saying he had spoken to hundreds of Franco-Ontarians in the last few weeks and offered some concessions after hearing their concerns.
“They realize that our province was left in a bankruptcy state,” he said. “They realize they were being used as pawns, and that’s shameful to use Franco-Ontarians as pawns during the election.”
Franco-Ontarians suggest legal challenge over PC government cuts
MARIN: Hysteria over Ontario’s French watchdog overblown
Simard argued Wednesday that the government’s moves would not “contribute in any meaningful way” to the provincial belt-tightening.
Some opposition legislators praised Simard’s courage in standing up for her constituents.
“This young MPP has been through a very, very hard time. It took a lot of courage for her to stand up yesterday in the legislature, it’s taken a lot of courage for her to leave what is her political family and my heart goes out to her,” said Liberal legislator and former premier Kathleen Wynne.
“That situation is one that the government has brought upon itself because I don’t think anyone, including this young MPP Amanda Simard, expected that the government would declare war on the francophone population in Ontario.”
Asked whether the Liberals would try to recruit Simard, Wynne said neither she nor her colleagues have had that conversation with the newly independent legislator, but added they are open to those who want to work with them.
The Assemblee de la francophonie de l’Ontario, an organization representing Franco-Ontarians, said it respects Simard’s decision to sever ties with the government.
“Ms. Simard is a principled person who has a right to manage her political future. We thank her for being a friend of Ontario’s francophone community,” the group said on Twitter.
Simard, who represents the eastern Ontario riding of Glengarry-Prescott-Russell, served as a city councillor in the community of Russell before joining the Tory roster under then-leader Patrick Brown. She holds a law degree from the University of Ottawa and previously worked on Parliament Hill as a policy adviser.

http://torontosun.com/news/provincia...g-francophones
make independants great again
miga
 
Jinentonix
+2
#2  Top Rated Post
Quote:

A Progressive Conservative legislator who publicly denounced Ontario’s decision to eliminate the independent office of the French-language services commissioner and a planned French-language university has left the Tory caucus.

Sooo we need duplication of services to do the same thing in a different language? As for the university, yeah, what that massive center of Francophone language and culture called Toronto desperately needs is a French-language university. You know, because obviously those 600,000 Franchophones living in Ontario speak French and only French.

I mean c'mon. Take a look at a the demographics. A Chinese-language university in Toronto would make more sense.
 
Twin_Moose
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Sooo we need duplication of services to do the same thing in a different language? As for the university, yeah, what that massive center of Francophone language and culture called Toronto desperately needs is a French-language university. You know, because obviously those 600,000 Franchophones living in Ontario speak French and only French.
I mean c'mon. Take a look at a the demographics. A Chinese-language university in Toronto would make more sense.

Yeah but I want it, I want it, I want it

 
White_Unifier
+1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Sooo we need duplication of services to do the same thing in a different language? As for the university, yeah, what that massive center of Francophone language and culture called Toronto desperately needs is a French-language university. You know, because obviously those 600,000 Franchophones living in Ontario speak French and only French.
I mean c'mon. Take a look at a the demographics. A Chinese-language university in Toronto would make more sense.

Why not just issue school vouchers and then let the market decide.
 
Jinentonix
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

Why not just issue school vouchers and then let the market decide.

Because it was going to be built with public money. Not really sure if, "Hey, let's use taxpayer money to build a school and then let the market decide if it was worth it" is the smart way to spend taxpayer money. Especially after 15 years of the Liberals cooking the books and spending money like they had their own personal money tree.
 
spaminator
#6
SNOBELEN: Simard jumps ship as Ford government changes course
John Snobelen
Published:
November 30, 2018
Updated:
November 30, 2018 12:58 PM EST
Tory MPP Amanda Simard addressed spoke to media at St. Isidore Recreation Centre about the proposed cuts to francophone institutions, Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018. Ashley Fraser/Postmedia ORG XMIT: POS1811251529176921Ashley Fraser / Postmedia
It’s been said a smart person is right 50% of the time and a wise person knows which half.
Governments make choices and some of those choices are, inevitably, wrong.
Wise governments learn to acknowledge poor choices quickly. Unwise governments let them linger.
New governments are notorious for having a problem finding reverse gear. They obfuscate and dither long after it is painfully evident they are on the wrong path.
The Ford government had to shift into reverse rapidly over the recently announced axing of the French-language services commissioner.
To their credit, they made the shift quickly.
Figuring out what went wrong isn’t exactly, as a friend of mine would say, rocket surgery.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford leaves an early morning PC Caucus meeting at the Ontario Legislature in Toronto on Thursday, November 29, 2018. (Chris Young/The Canadian Press) Chris Young / THE CANADIAN PRESS
Just two weeks ago, as part of the fall economic statement, the Ford government announced it would combine three advocacy offices — the child advocate, the environment commissioner and the French-language services commissioner — into two Legislative Assembly oversight bodies, the auditor general and the ombudsman.
They didn’t expect much fuss.
Rolling these functions together held the modest promise of finding at least some efficiencies (although the total budgets would hardly equal the Windex bill at the Ministry of Health in an average month).
Heck, it’s just possible that the environment, children and those dependent on French-language services would be better served as part of a larger office.
I’m willing to bet that the government didn’t see any reason to run these modest changes up a flagpole.
They probably expected little pushback from canceling nebulous plans to fund a French-language university.
After all, they had previously cancelled three other university expansions that were much closer to construction.
So rolling up a few commissions and cancelling another university was no big deal, right?
Wrong.
Within days of the economic statement a fecal storm blew up over the French-language services office. That storm was still picking up speed when the Ford Government slammed into reverse and agreed to keep the French-language services commissioner (albeit still in the ombudsman’s office), add a French-language staffer in the Premier’s office (Dean French?) and reintroduce a Ministry of Francophone Affairs.
Tory MPP Amanda Simard spoke to media at St. Isidore Recreation Centre about the proposed cuts to francophone institutions on Sunday, Nov. 25, 2018. (Ashley Fraser/Postmedia) Ashley Fraser / Postmedia
Now that, my friends, is a fine bit of backing up.
No government likes to be wrong, but the Ford Government will benefit from finding this new gear.
No doubt the government will be more inclined to field test initiatives that appear innocuous.
Premier Ford might find that, while his straight from the hip style works most of the time, a little empathy and — dare I say it — appeasement makes governing a lot easier.
No shift into reverse comes without cost.
In this case an intentionally small Executive Council has gained a ministry.
A minister, Caroline Mulroney, has had the always-unpleasant experience of defending a government position publicly while working to change it behind the cabinet door.
PC MPP Amanda Simard, second row right, is seen seated amongst fellow MPP’s and Ontario Premier Doug Ford, left, as the legislature sits inside Queens Park in Toronto on September 15, 2018. (Cole Burston/The Canadian Press) Cole Burston / THE CANADIAN PRESS
But the real cost is the unnecessary defection of a caucus member, MPP Amanda Simard.
Simard was at the centre of the previously mentioned fecal storm. Her protests helped to convince the government to back down.
But, instead of serving her constituents by helping the government fix the problem, she abandoned Queen’s Park, returning to cheers from the opposition.
Now she is sitting as an independent and her constituents have lost a voice in the government caucus.
Her departure, even as the government was addressing her issues, is a little baffling.
I suspect, in the coming months, Simard will find that opposition cheers ring hollow.

http://torontosun.com/opinion/column...changes-course
 
White_Unifier
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Because it was going to be built with public money. Not really sure if, "Hey, let's use taxpayer money to build a school and then let the market decide if it was worth it" is the smart way to spend taxpayer money. Especially after 15 years of the Liberals cooking the books and spending money like they had their own personal money tree.

I don't follow. A school voucher would involve giving an electronic voucher to the student that he could then present to the institution of his choice and it could teach in the official or unofficial language of its choice according to market demand.

I'm in two minds about public funding for post-compulsory education; but if the state is to fund it, then it makes sense to leave as much of it to the free market as possible.
 
Johnnny
+1
#8
She's ****ing hot
 
White_Unifier
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Johnnny View Post

She's ****ing hot

And how's that relevant?
 
MHz
#10
Why do you think women at the Olympics are watched mostly by horny men? Oops, might have spilled the beans already.
 
White_Unifier
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Why do you think women at the Olympics are watched mostly by horny men? Oops, might have spilled the beans already.

That flatulence will get you every time.
 
MHz
#12
I always post this version of this song because she is so good looking nobody is doing anything other than watching the clear vid as long as it plays.



Judge for yourself.
Poor vid quality.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VoOG7LEyUJ0
Better vid quality
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abw49k3rIN0
 
spaminator
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Johnnny View Post

She's ****ing hot

she would look better with the zit removed.
 
White_Unifier
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

she would look better with the zit removed.

The one under her left nostril? I don't know if it's a zit, but damn you're picky. I never even noticed that.
 
MHz
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

she would look better with the zit removed.

The one between her shoulders?? I would think a leader would stay and fix what is wrong rather than seeing her fame and fortune is on the other side of the isle.
 
White_Unifier
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

The one between her shoulders?? I would think a leader would stay and fix what is wrong rather than seeing her fame and fortune is on the other side of the isle.

He said a zit, not two breasts.
 
Danbones
#17
What's that oozing out of her ear?
 
White_Unifier
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

What's that oozing out of her ear?

A stud. No, not me. I mean a stud earring.
 
MHz
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

He said a zit, not two breasts.

Do you pop zits with your mouth, yucky, leave 1 for me, . . . .
 
MHz
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

A stud. No, not me. I mean a stud earring.

So much for 'virgin ears'.
 
spaminator
#21
Brian Mulroney apologizes for 'little girl' comment
Canadian Press
Published:
March 18, 2019
Updated:
March 18, 2019 7:32 PM EDT
Independent MPP Amanda Simard speaks to the media on Monday, March 18, 2019. Antonella Artuso/Toronto Sun
TORONTO — Former prime minister Brian Mulroney apologized Monday for using the term “little girl” to refer to an Ontario politician who left the Progressive Conservative caucus over cuts to francophone services.
Mulroney appeared Sunday night on Radio Canada’s “Tout le monde en parle,” and defended his daughter Caroline Mulroney, Ontario’s attorney general and francophone affairs minister.
“She is the best voice that Ontario francophones could ever have, believe me,” the former prime minister said in French. “The little girl who resigned, she has left. That’s over. But Caroline is still there to defend the interests of Ontario francophones.”
Brian Mulroney apologized the next day, saying he used the French expression “p’tite fille,” translated as little girl, while speaking about Amanda Simard when he should have said “young woman.”
“I had no intention of insulting anyone with this poor choice of words and would like to offer my sincere apologies,” he said in a statement.
Story continues below
Earlier Monday, Simard addressed the comments on Twitter, writing that Mulroney was attempting to defend his daughter, who “completely abandoned Franco-Ontarians.”
“He has done great things for Canada, but his comments belong to another era and have no place in a respectful and egalitarian society,” Simard wrote.
After question period Monday at the Ontario legislature, Simard further said that one positive to emerge from the incident was that people were “overwhelmingly” condemning the remark.
“The fact that so many people are denouncing his comments is encouraging for women in politics,” she said. “I think we need to support women in politics and not retort to those types of name calling.”
Caroline Mulroney did not answer questions after question period.
Simard was elected last year at the age of 29 to represent the largely French-speaking eastern Ontario riding of Glengarry-Prescott-Russell.
She left the Tory caucus in the wake of the government’s decision to eliminate the independent office of the French-language services commissioner and scrap a planned French-language university.
After an outcry from Franco-Ontarians, the government announced it would create a commissioner position within the office of the provincial ombudsman, establish a Ministry of Francophone Affairs and hire a senior policy adviser on francophone affairs in the premier’s office. But Simard said she was not satisfied by the “partial backtracking” on the cuts.
Premier Doug Ford has said the measures regarding the commissioner and the university were necessary to bring down the province’s deficit, although he has not said how much would be saved.
Brian Mulroney told “Tout le monde en parle” that Ford was elected to trim the deficit and debt.
“So it took cuts, changes of attitude, etcetera, and everyone was affected, including the Franco-Ontarians,” he said. “But it has been barely a year that Caroline is there. You are going to see with time how well she works with her colleagues to mend fences and to rebuild confidence between Ontario’s French minority and the Ford government.”

http://torontosun.com/news/provincia...e-girl-comment
 

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