Where did all the other humanoid species go?


Cliffy
#1
Were other humans the first victims of the sixth mass extinction?

Nine human species walked the Earth 300,000 years ago. Now there is just one. The Neanderthals, Homo neanderthalensis, were stocky hunters adapted to Europe’s cold steppes. The related Denisovans inhabited Asia, while the more primitive Homo erectus lived in Indonesia, and Homo rhodesiensis in central Africa.
Several short, small-brained species survived alongside them: Homo naledi in South Africa, Homo luzonensis in the Philippines, Homo floresiensis (“hobbits”) in Indonesia, and the mysterious Red Deer Cave People in China. Given how quickly we’re discovering new species, more are likely waiting to be found.
By 10,000 years ago, they were all gone. The disappearance of these other species resembles a mass extinction. But there’s no obvious environmental catastrophe – volcanic eruptions, climate change, asteroid impact – driving it. Instead, the extinctions’ timing suggests they were caused by the spread of a new species, evolving 260,000-350,000 years ago in Southern Africa: Homo sapiens.
The spread of modern humans out of Africa has caused a sixth mass extinction, a greater than 40,000-year event extending from the disappearance of Ice Age mammals to the destruction of rainforests by civilisation today. But were other humans the first casualties?

We are a uniquely dangerous species. We hunted wooly mammoths, ground sloths and moas to extinction. We destroyed plains and forests for farming, modifying over half the planet’s land area. We altered the planet’s climate. But we are most dangerous to other human populations, because we compete for resources and land.
History is full of examples of people warring, displacing and wiping out other groups over territory, from Rome’s destruction of Carthage, to the American conquest of the West and the British colonisation of Australia. There have also been recent genocides and ethnic cleansing in Bosnia, Rwanda, Iraq, Darfur and Myanmar. Like language or tool use, a capacity for and tendency to engage in genocide is arguably an intrinsic, instinctive part of human nature. There’s little reason to think that early Homo sapiens were less territorial, less violent, less intolerant – less human.


More: https://theconversation.com/were-oth...inction-126638
 
Walter
+2
#2  Top Rated Post
Humans kill each other.
 
Cliffy
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Humans kill each other.

Well, that was a brilliant observation. Do you have any more words of wisdom to share?
 
Walter
+1
#4
The other humanoids we made extinct by humans. Occam’s razor.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#5
I watched a good documentary the other night, I think it was on Quest channel, about the 1959 Dyatlov Pass Incident in the Soviet Union. One theory is that the young hikers may have been killed by a yeti. Yetis are supposed to roam that area and a photo taken by one of the group shows an unidentified human-like figure in some trees. One of the group had written in her journal: "Now we know what snowmen look like." They all ended up dying in circumstances which are still mysterious to this day. A woman was interviewed on the programme and she believes there are other species of humans still in existence, living out in the vast wildernesses where our species rarely ventures and that the yeti and bigfoot could be one or more of these other human species.
Last edited by Blackleaf; 1 week ago at 06:41 PM..
 
Danbones
+1
#6
Yes, if we were to actually do history, the bible will explode.

so NO history please.

Someone want to explain where were the "white people" before the European glaciers melted?

What white people?

The ones that were products of Neanderthal, cro magnon, human, "hobbit people" interbreeding in the middle east for the last 250,000 years.


Neanderthal DNA in Modern Human Genomes Is Not Silent

With the issue of Neanderthal/modern human mating settled, scientists could focus on a new goal, says Akey, now at Princeton University. Namely, what was the consequence of this interbreeding? “Was it just this curious feature of human history that didn’t have an impact, or did it alter the trajectory of human evolution?”

In the past five years, a flurry of research has sought to answer that question. Genomic analyses have associated Neanderthal variants with differences in the expression levels of diverse genes and of phenotypes ranging from skin and hair color to immune function and neuropsychiatric disease. But researchers cannot yet say how these archaic sequences affect people today, much less the humans who acquired them some 50,000–55,000 years ago.

From skin color to immunity, human biology is linked to our archaic ancestry.
https://www.the-scientist.com/featur...t-silent-66299
Last edited by Danbones; 3 days ago at 05:03 AM..
 
Curious Cdn
#7
They were all killed off ... murdered by us "Moderns".
 
Danbones
#8
Up 'till a lot of people got guns at any rate...
 
Curious Cdn
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

Up 'till a lot of people got guns at any rate...

You're right. There are still pockets of Neanderthals here and there forming their armed militias against modern humans.
 
Danbones
#10
lol says the nazi that wants every one's guns so his weener b8tches can take over.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#11
From about 1.2 million years ago to less than 100,000 years ago, archaic humans, including archaic Homo sapiens, were dark-skinned.

As Homo sapiens populations began to migrate, the evolutionary constraint keeping skin dark decreased proportionally to the distance north a population migrated, resulting in a range of skin tones within northern populations.

At some point, some northern populations experienced positive selection for lighter skin due to the increased production of vitamin D from sunlight and the genes for darker skin disappeared from these populations.

Subsequent migrations into different UV environments and admixture between populations have resulted in the varied range of skin pigmentations we see today.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_skin_color
 
Blackleaf
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

They were all killed off ... murdered by us "Moderns".

Nobody knows for sure what killed them off.
 
Curious Cdn
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Nobody knows for sure what killed them off.

That's what you get when there's no ban on obsidian projectile points.
 
Blackleaf
+2
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

That's what you get when there's no ban on obsidian projectile points.

After the mass shooting of 57000BC the government banned all projectiles greater than 1.5 cubits in length.
 
Curious Cdn
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

After the mass shooting of 57000BC the government banned all projectiles greater than 1.5 cubits in length.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/...nze-age-battle
 
Mowich
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Were other humans the first victims of the sixth mass extinction?

Nine human species walked the Earth 300,000 years ago. Now there is just one. The Neanderthals, Homo neanderthalensis, were stocky hunters adapted to Europe’s cold steppes. The related Denisovans inhabited Asia, while the more primitive Homo erectus lived in Indonesia, and Homo rhodesiensis in central Africa.
Several short, small-brained species survived alongside them: Homo naledi in South Africa, Homo luzonensis in the Philippines, Homo floresiensis (“hobbits”) in Indonesia, and the mysterious Red Deer Cave People in China. Given how quickly we’re discovering new species, more are likely waiting to be found.
By 10,000 years ago, they were all gone. The disappearance of these other species resembles a mass extinction. But there’s no obvious environmental catastrophe – volcanic eruptions, climate change, asteroid impact – driving it. Instead, the extinctions’ timing suggests they were caused by the spread of a new species, evolving 260,000-350,000 years ago in Southern Africa: Homo sapiens.
The spread of modern humans out of Africa has caused a sixth mass extinction, a greater than 40,000-year event extending from the disappearance of Ice Age mammals to the destruction of rainforests by civilisation today. But were other humans the first casualties?

We are a uniquely dangerous species. We hunted wooly mammoths, ground sloths and moas to extinction. We destroyed plains and forests for farming, modifying over half the planet’s land area. We altered the planet’s climate. But we are most dangerous to other human populations, because we compete for resources and land.
History is full of examples of people warring, displacing and wiping out other groups over territory, from Rome’s destruction of Carthage, to the American conquest of the West and the British colonisation of Australia. There have also been recent genocides and ethnic cleansing in Bosnia, Rwanda, Iraq, Darfur and Myanmar. Like language or tool use, a capacity for and tendency to engage in genocide is arguably an intrinsic, instinctive part of human nature. There’s little reason to think that early Homo sapiens were less territorial, less violent, less intolerant – less human.


More: https://theconversation.com/were-oth...inction-126638

So now you are picking on the poor Neanderthals to try and make a point, Cliffy? That is really sad - especially as there is every reason to believe that somewhere lurking in your DNA are strands from those earlier ancestors. Nothing like hating on family, eh.
 
darkbeaver
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

The other humanoids we made extinct by humans. Occam’s razor.


Coagulation.
 
darkbeaver
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

They were all killed off ... murdered by us "Moderns".


There,s no such thing as modern. We are simply configurations of contemporary solar physics, when that sky changes so do we humans .