Advice to Conservatives: Think twice


spaminator
#31
BONOKOSKI: The wakening of the sleepy Senate not good news for Scheer
Mark Bonokoski
Published:
November 23, 2019
Updated:
November 23, 2019 2:30 PM EST
Conservative leader Andrew Scheer speaks at a news conference the day after he lost the federal election to Justin Trudeau in Regina, on Oct. 22, 2019.Todd Korol / Reuters
Unless there is a scandal involving skimming off taxpayers’ money or lurid tales of sexual improprieties, Canadians do not spend a lot of time pondering the lives and times of those who populate the Senate.
If there is paint to watch dry, there’s at least an option.
The headline-producing exceptions, of course, were the Ol’ Duff’s victorious and highly-publicized legal battle over accusations of playing fast and loose with his Senate expense account, and Sen. Don Meredith, a disgraced Pentecostal minister from Toronto who resigned after being found guilty by the Senate’s ethics office in 2017 of having a two-year fling with a girl that began she was only 16.
Sen. Mike Duffy(The Canadian Press)
And then everyone went back to watching paint dry-and that’s with Sen. Mike Duffy remaining low, and Meredith back in Toronto with his personal bio long gone from the Senate’s website.
Within a week of the Oct. 21 election, Conservative Sen. Jean-Guy Dagenais, rewarded with a Senate seat for his failure to win his Quebec riding in 2011, was calling for the resignation of Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer.
Story continues below
His reason? Quebec would remain a dead zone for Tory MPs if the social-conservative Scheer were to remain the party’s leader.
He is likely not far from wrong.
Dagenais’ party loyalty, therefore, has come to an end-sort of.
His Senate office sent out a news release last week in which the former 40-year-veteran cop in the Surete du Quebec announced he was leaving the Conservative caucus and sitting, instead, with the newly-formed Canadian Senators group which allegedly makes him even less constrained.
Senator Jean-Guy Dagenais poses for a photo in his office in Ottawa Feb 21, 2012. (ANDRE FORGET/QMI AGENCY)
But he’s keeping his membership card because it’s “the only political party in the country that conveys his economic and national security values.”
“Andrew Scheer’s beliefs about abortion and same-sex marriages led to a mass exodus of the Quebec vote that the party hoped to win with the excellent candidates who had been recruited,” read Dagenais’ news release.
Dagenais argued the Conservatives “wasted a unique opportunity” in the federal election with a result that will only be repeated “if the current leader and those who advise him remain in office as is the case at this time.”
The Conservatives, of course, won only 10 seats in the province of Quebec, with the Liberals taking 35 seats, the Bloc Quebecois 32, and the sad-sack NDP just one, a far cry from the late Jack Layton’s “Orange Crush” of 2011 when 59 seats were gained.
The other defector, by the way, was P.E.I. Sen. Percy Downe who, until his Senate appointment in 2003, was chief-of-staff to Liberal PM Jean Chretien.
Surely this was coincidental.
It has yet to play out how far the breakaway senators will go now that party loyalty no longer has them hog-tied to enforced discipline, and with Dagenais having five more years as a senator to mess with the political landscape.
Mike Duffy was pawn in a bigger game
Ex-senator Don Meredith harassed staff, constable, ethics officer reports
Patrick Brazeau takes seat in Senate for first time in more than three years
EDITORIAL: How the Senate failed to deal with Lavscam
Since the national media rarely looks at the Senate unless there are money scandals or sex shenanigans, rest assured there is a plot or two afoot.
So, if Scheer is going to survive and then win the mandatory leadership vote at the party’s convention in April, he had best be tuned in to the Senate’s rumour mill and its ever-present political conspiracy theorists.
One can bet the family farm that there are already contenders hiding in the Conservative weeds and weighing their chances at success.
The sleepy old Senate is therefore worth keeping an eye for plots, conspiracies and the insider scuttlebutt that is always churning from within.
Knowledge, after all, is power.
markbonokoski@gmail.com
http://torontosun.com/opinion/column...ews-for-scheer
 
spaminator
#32
Scheer fires chief of staff, communications director in wake of election loss
Canadian Press
Published:
November 23, 2019
Updated:
November 23, 2019 6:12 PM EST
Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer speaks to reporters after meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Nov. 12, 2019. (REUTERS/Patrick Doyle)
Federal Conservative party Leader Andrew Scheer dismissed two of his top aides on Saturday as he and his party grapple with the fallout of what many see as a disappointing performance in last month’s election.
Scheer announced the changes in a morning letter to caucus, saying chief of staff Marc-Andre Leclerc and communications director Brock Harrison have been relieved of their duties effective immediately.
Martin Belanger and Simon Jefferies will fill the respective posts on an interim basis until full-time replacements can be found.
Scheer did not spell out reasons for the dismissals in his letter, saying only that personnel changes were being made as the party prepares to assume an active role in the Liberal-led minority parliament.
“We have an important job to do — holding Justin Trudeau and his corrupt Liberal government to account — and when we do that job well, we will be ready to replace him when the next election comes,” the letter said.
Story continues below
The changes come at a time when both the party and Scheer are facing tough questions following the results of the Oct. 21 election.
Scheer was widely perceived as a front-runner following the SNC-Lavalin affair that was believed to have dimmed Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s chances at re-election. Victory seemed still more plausible after images surfaced earlier in the campaign depicting Trudeau in blackface.
But polls consistently showed that Scheer was unable to gain a meaningful edge, with the Liberals and Conservatives running in a dead heat throughout the campaign.
And while the Conservatives gained seats on election day, few of them came in the seat-rich battlegrounds of Quebec and Ontario. The Liberals now form a minority government with the Conservatives maintaining their status as the official Opposition.
Word of the staffing changes came as Scheer toured the Atlantic provinces, partially to gather feedback from party members.
Both of the dismissed staffers issued Facebook posts acknowledging the personnel changes and thanking Scheer for his support over the years.
“Of course, the results of October 21 are not what I expected,” Leclerc wrote. “But they do not reflect all the efforts our team made before and during the campaign.”
Leclerc said he would now be retiring from politics after spending the past 10 years in the field.
“I wish nothing but success to my former colleagues in the months ahead,” wrote Harrison, who once worked for Alberta’s now-defunct Wildrose party. “We all poured ourselves into this campaign, and while I am part of changes that had to be made, I hope you all continue on with your eyes on the prize.”
Questions around Scheer’s own job continue to swirl as the house prepares to resume in two weeks time.
His fate will be decided at a leadership review in April 2020.
Tory Sen. Dagenais quits caucus over Scheer's socially conservative views
Peter MacKay again denies he wants to be Tory leader
http://torontosun.com/news/national/...-election-loss
 
spaminator
#33
LILLEY: Scheer axes top staffers to save his own job but is it too late?
Brian Lilley
Published:
November 23, 2019
Updated:
November 23, 2019 7:08 PM EST
Conservative leader Andrew Scheer speaks at a news conference the day after he lost the federal election to Justin Trudeau in Regina, Oct. 22, 2019. (REUTERS/Todd Korol)
Andrew Scheer has finally taken action to shake up the operations after the Conservative loss in last month’s election.
The question now becomes, is it too late?
It was announced Saturday morning that Scheer had fired his chief of staff, Marc-André Leclerc, and his director of communications, Brock Harrison.
“I would like to thank Marc-André and Brock for their service to our team and to our movement over the past number of years. These decisions are never easy, especially when they involve friends,” Scheer wrote in a letter to Conservative MPs and staff.
This should have been done the day after the election or shortly thereafter to show that Scheer realized he and his team had screwed up but he was going to fix it. Instead he dithered in making changes, was slow to call candidates and supporters to thank them for their support and allowed the various groups plotting to oust him to fester and organize.
Story continues below
I think it would be foolish for the Conservatives to dump Scheer at this point but he’s been slow to show that he can or will change himself or shake up operations. Firing Leclerc and Harrison was necessary and perhaps if Scheer was hesitant in firing them the two men should have done the right thing and resigned.
When you are a political staffer your job is to protect your boss and sometimes that means falling on your sword. The fact this took a month to happen is not a good sign.
In that month the people looking to push Scheer out have been talking, meeting, plotting and raising funds. There is plenty of chatter, whispers in every conversation about what is happening. And while few are willing to step forward and say they’re looking to oust Scheer publicly, these movements are real.
Beyond the outrage of hard-core social conservatives angry Scheer wasn’t strong enough in their view on issues like abortion and same-sex marraige, there are others who want the leader gone from the other side. Money is being raised among Red Tories to pay for anti-Scheer candidates to travel to Toronto and vote against him in April.
And there is constant talk of Brian Mulroney looking to find a replacement, though it won’t be his daughter Caroline who is not interested at this time.
Last week at Toronto’s Albany Club, a meeting of Ontario Progressive Conservatives featured people sporting and passing around buttons saying “Vote Yes.” Another button showed an empty hockey net, an allusion to the comment by Peter MacKay that Scheer losing the election was like missing a “breakaway on an empty net.”
BONOKOSKI: The wakening of the sleepy Senate not good news for Scheer
GOLDSTEIN: Andrew Scheer's trial by religion
Ontario Premier Doug Ford isn’t part of the push to ditch Scheer and he’s unlikely to get involved, but don’t expect him to stop his people from getting involved if they want to. Scheer refused to say Ford’s name for much of the election campaign, let alone be seen in public with the premier.
Scheer’s indifference to Ford is about to be repaid in kind.
Kory Teneycke, Ford’s campaign manager in the 2018 election, insists he isn’t behind any organized attempt to get rid of Scheer but says he has to go as leader.
“Most people don’t want to resign but eventually they make the right decision,” Teneycke said.
I have trouble believing Scheer will resign before the Conservative convention but there are people trying to find ways to convince the leader to step down and allow the party to pick a new leader quickly.
So as Scheer finally starts going out and talking to party faithful — he had meetings in Newfoundland and Nova Scotia over the weekend while travelling there for other business — he faces a number of disparate attempts to force him to step down.
“It would be easier to name the people not trying to take out Scheer,” one former supporter said.
Seems the Conservatives have reverted back to their tradition of circling the wagons and shooting inside at each other. Scheer has a big fight on his hands to survive his leadership review in April, if he can last that long.
blilley@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/opinion/column...is-it-too-late
 
spaminator
#34
Scheer appoints floor-crossing Liberal as deputy leader of Conservative party
Canadian Press
Published:
November 28, 2019
Updated:
November 28, 2019 12:16 PM EST
In this Oct. 10, 2019 file photo, Leona Alleslev is pictured at her campaign office during the federal election. (Veronica Henri/Toronto Sun/Postmedia Network)
OTTAWA — Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer said Thursday that despite considerable party infighting over his future as leader, he will remain at the helm, and as a show of how he intends to change the party, he’s appointed a former Liberal as his number 2.
Toronto-area MP Leona Alleslev was named this morning as deputy leader of the Conservatives, replacing former deputy leader Lisa Raitt, a longtime MP who lost her own Toronto-area seat in the October election.
Alleslev was first elected as a Liberal in 2015, but crossed the floor to join the Conservatives in September 2018, saying at the time she disagreed with the Liberals’ handling of the economy and foreign affairs.
She declined to answer questions from reporters Thursday, leaving Scheer to explain why he plucked her out his 120-member caucus, as opposed to others who had been in the trenches with the Tories for years.
“This is all about moving forward,” Scheer said.
“Leona embodies exactly the type of person that we are trying to reach out to, to show that if you have voted Liberals in the past, if you are disappointed with the government that Justin Trudeau has been providing Canadians, there is a place for you in the Conservative Party of Canada.”
Scheer has kept some longtime loyalists on the team who will manage the party’s affairs in the House of Commons, including Candice Bergen, who will remain as House leader and Mark Strahl, who will stay as chief Opposition whip.
Many members of the party have been outspoken in recent days about Scheer’s failure to win a majority government in October, citing a variety of reasons why they feel he can no longer stay on as leader and demanding he resign.
Scheer fires chief of staff, communications director in wake of election loss
Tory Sen. Dagenais quits caucus over Scheer's socially conservative views
Peter MacKay again denies he wants to be Tory leader
Two campaigns have now been launched to galvanize grassroots support against Scheer, in the hopes of either forcing him to step aside soon, or lose a leadership review that will be held at the party’s convention in April.
Scheer reiterated Thursday he intends to spend the coming months making the case for why he should stay on.
In the meantime, he intends to remain where he is.
“I am staying on to fight the fight that Canadians elected us to do,” he said.
http://torontosun.com/news/national/...ervative-party
 
spaminator
#35
Tory deputy leader apologizes for comparing Pride, St. Patrick’s Day parades
Canadian Press
Published:
November 30, 2019
Updated:
November 30, 2019 6:21 PM EST
Leader of the Opposition Andrew Scheer walks with Leona Alleslev, who crossed the floor from the Liberal party to Conservative party before Question Period on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Monday, September 17, 2018. Adrian Wyld / THE CANADIAN PRESS
Andrew Scheer’s second-in-command apologized Saturday after comparing the Conservative leader’s decision not to march in a Pride parade to choosing not to take part in a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
Leona Alleslev, who was named the Tories’ deputy leader earlier this week, made the comments on an episode of the CBC News radio show “The House” that aired Saturday morning.
When asked if she had an issue with Scheer not attending Pride parades, Alleslev gave a response that drew online criticism.
“I think that’s obviously his choice and we live in a country where that’s his choice,” she said, referring to Scheer. “Have we asked anybody if they’ve marched in a St.Patrick’s day parade?”
Alleslev apologized for the comment on Twitter on Saturday afternoon, saying that the Pride parade is an important symbol in the fight for LGBTQ rights.
Story continues below
“I did not intend to make erroneous and hurtful comparisons — I apologize unreservedly,” she wrote.
In another tweet, she said she’s committed to being a progressive voice and ensuring equal opportunity exists in the Conservative party.
Over the summer, the Liberals lambasted Scheer for declining to participate in any Pride events and dug up 14-year-old video footage of him speaking out against same-sex marriage.
In August, then-public safety minister Ralph Goodale — who lost his seat in the October election — tweeted a short, edited video of an April 2005 speech Scheer gave in the House of Commons explaining his opposition to the Civil Marriage Act, which legalized same-sex marriage in Canada later that year.
Scheer has softened his stance on same-sex marriage since the debates over the Civil Marriage Act, supporting a move to erase the traditional definition of marriage from the Conservative Party of Canada’s policy book at its 2016 convention.
Scheer has been touring the country to make his case to the party faithful that he should be allowed to continue to lead the Tories, even after losing the federal election.
He received a warm reception while speaking at the Alberta United Conservative Party’s annual general meeting on Friday, but a contingent of MPs and other party members have been calling for his resignation.
Scheer appoints floor-crossing Liberal as deputy leader of Conservative party
Andrew Scheer welcomes former Liberal MP Leona Alleslev to Conservative caucus
Defecting MP Leona Alleslev says decision was 'personal' as Liberals left in disbelief
He’ll have a chance to fight for his spot at the party’s helm at the Conservatives’ convention in April.
Alleslev was first elected as a Liberal MP in 2015 in the Toronto area, but crossed the floor to join the Conservatives in September of last year.
http://torontosun.com/news/national/...ks-day-parades
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#36
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

Tory deputy leader apologizes for comparing Pride, St. Patrick’s Day parades
Canadian Press
Published:
November 30, 2019
Updated:
November 30, 2019 6:21 PM EST
Leader of the Opposition Andrew Scheer walks with Leona Alleslev, who crossed the floor from the Liberal party to Conservative party before Question Period on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Monday, September 17, 2018. Adrian Wyld / THE CANADIAN PRESS
Andrew Scheer’s second-in-command apologized Saturday after comparing the Conservative leader’s decision not to march in a Pride parade to choosing not to take part in a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
Leona Alleslev, who was named the Tories’ deputy leader earlier this week, made the comments on an episode of the CBC News radio show “The House” that aired Saturday morning.
When asked if she had an issue with Scheer not attending Pride parades, Alleslev gave a response that drew online criticism.
“I think that’s obviously his choice and we live in a country where that’s his choice,” she said, referring to Scheer. “Have we asked anybody if they’ve marched in a St.Patrick’s day parade?”
Alleslev apologized for the comment on Twitter on Saturday afternoon, saying that the Pride parade is an important symbol in the fight for LGBTQ rights.
Story continues below
“I did not intend to make erroneous and hurtful comparisons — I apologize unreservedly,” she wrote.
In another tweet, she said she’s committed to being a progressive voice and ensuring equal opportunity exists in the Conservative party.
Over the summer, the Liberals lambasted Scheer for declining to participate in any Pride events and dug up 14-year-old video footage of him speaking out against same-sex marriage.
In August, then-public safety minister Ralph Goodale — who lost his seat in the October election — tweeted a short, edited video of an April 2005 speech Scheer gave in the House of Commons explaining his opposition to the Civil Marriage Act, which legalized same-sex marriage in Canada later that year.
Scheer has softened his stance on same-sex marriage since the debates over the Civil Marriage Act, supporting a move to erase the traditional definition of marriage from the Conservative Party of Canada’s policy book at its 2016 convention.
Scheer has been touring the country to make his case to the party faithful that he should be allowed to continue to lead the Tories, even after losing the federal election.
He received a warm reception while speaking at the Alberta United Conservative Party’s annual general meeting on Friday, but a contingent of MPs and other party members have been calling for his resignation.
Scheer appoints floor-crossing Liberal as deputy leader of Conservative party
Andrew Scheer welcomes former Liberal MP Leona Alleslev to Conservative caucus
Defecting MP Leona Alleslev says decision was 'personal' as Liberals left in disbelief
He’ll have a chance to fight for his spot at the party’s helm at the Conservatives’ convention in April.
Alleslev was first elected as a Liberal MP in 2015 in the Toronto area, but crossed the floor to join the Conservatives in September of last year.
http://torontosun.com/news/national/...ks-day-parades

Another weak ass red Tory that does not have the courage of his convictions. No wonder they lost .
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#37
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Another weak ass red Tory that does not have the courage of his convictions. No wonder they lost .

The only chance that the Conservatives will ever have ... for ever and ever to form a government is to entice back those Red Tories that have fairly well abandoned them because they are not rootin' tootin' Alt Reich Yahoos.

No Red Tories ... no power.
 
Hoid
+1
#38
The term "conservative" is a misnomer. They are the Reform Party plain and simple. A Western regional party
 
Ron in Regina
Free Thinker
+2
#39
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

The term "conservative" is a misnomer. They are the Reform Party plain and simple. A Western regional party

.....and yet somehow had more Canadians vote for this regional party than any other Federal Party in the last election. Isn't that strange?
 
Ron in Regina
Free Thinker
+2
#40
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

The term "conservative" is a misnomer. They are the Reform Party plain and simple. A Western regional party

So, which region does the Liberal Party represent? Just curious how it fits into your definition (whatever that is?) of a regional party...

 
Hoid
#41
Liberals are strong everywhere in Canada. Always have been.
 
Girth
#42
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Liberals are strong everywhere in Canada. Always have been.

Serious question:

Have you been splitting percocets with Curious Cdn?

Anyone that can read a map, can see that the Liberals performed poorly outside Atlantic Canada and large Canadian metro areas. If this election were only based on rural Canadian ridings, the Conservatives would have a huge majority. Just look at how poorly the Liberals did in Western Canada outside Winnipeg and Vancouver. In fact, the Grits did not exactly win big in Quebec and Ontario outside the Capital region, Montreal, and the GTA.


Learn how to read maps.
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#43
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

So, which region does the Liberal Party represent? Just curious how it fits into your definition (whatever that is?) of a regional party...




To me, this map shows possibly more than just the divide of parties, but the divide of the TYPES of people for the parties.


Maritime Tories are not Western Tories and I don't think the Tories are the same in other provinces, either. Just like Liberals on the East Coast aren't BC or Yukon liberals.


I don't think you can go by the map either because what you're seeing is which party won, not the numbers of votes; so while, say my area went Liberal, second place was Green and the PC were a far back third. So though the Libs won here, Green had a super strong showing. Yet out in Alberta, say Calgary, Cons won huge majorities with Liberals coming in almost half as many votes second place.


But if you just look at the map without context, I think it might be said that the Liberals represent a varying degree of places across Canada, the Conservatives are mostly a Western Party, the NDP are semi-popular, the Bloc are obviously just for one Province and the Green are just patches of places.
 
Girth
#44
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

But if you just look at the map without context, I think it might be said that the Liberals represent a varying degree of places across Canada, the Conservatives are mostly a Western Party, the NDP are semi-popular, the Bloc are obviously just for one Province and the Green are just patches of places.

We must be reading two different maps.

I see most of Southern Ontario and significant sections of Southern Quebec painted Tory Blue. That is not even mentioning New Brunswick. Even excluding the GTA, Southern Ontario is rich in seats, so it's not like the support for Tories is non-existent there.
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#45
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

We must be reading two different maps.

I see most of Southern Ontario and significant sections of Southern Quebec painted Tory Blue. That is not even mentioning New Brunswick. Even excluding the GTA, Southern Ontario is rich in seats, so it's not like the support for Tories is non-existent there.


I think you're just not reading what I wrote.
 
Girth
#46
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

I think you're just not reading what I wrote.


Elaborate, please...
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
+2
#47
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

Elaborate, please...


I said that Tories across Canada aren't the same Tories as you'll find in the West.


Maritime Tories, for example, aren't really like West Tories.


I doubt Ontario Tories or Quebec Tories are like the west, either.


That doesn't make them less Tories, it just means that their reasons for voting Tory might not be the same as why the West did so.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#48
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

Serious question:
Have you been splitting percocets with Curious Cdn?
Anyone that can read a map, can see that the Liberals performed poorly outside Atlantic Canada and large Canadian metro areas. If this election were only based on rural Canadian ridings, the Conservatives would have a huge majority. Just look at how poorly the Liberals did in Western Canada outside Winnipeg and Vancouver. In fact, the Grits did not exactly win big in Quebec and Ontario outside the Capital region, Montreal, and the GTA.
Learn how to read maps.

I'm no fan of the liberals. The Conservatives lost that election. The Liberals didn't win it.
 
Girth
#49
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I'm no fan of the liberals. The Conservatives lost that election. The Liberals didn't win it.

Thank you, Captain Obvious.
 
Ron in Regina
Free Thinker
+3
#50
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Liberals are strong everywhere in Canada. Always have been.

OK. Please ignore the map as it might be confusing I just look at the numbers. If the conservative party is strictly a western regional party and the Liberals are strong everywhere, why did the Liberals receive less votes than the conservatives?? How is that even possible with your definition of a western regional party or a regional party in general?
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#51
Oh come on...How is a guy supposed to even speak with his feet and some extra socks in his mouth?
 
Hoid
#52
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

OK. Please ignore the map as it might be confusing I just look at the numbers. If the conservative party is strictly a western regional party and the Liberals are strong everywhere, why did the Liberals receive less votes than the conservatives?? How is that even possible with your definition of a western regional party or a regional party in general?

Take a look into the stats of this or any election.

You will find that in places where the liberals do not win they are typically in 2nd place.

that is what is meant by being strong everywhere.
 
Girth
+2
#53
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Take a look into the stats of this or any election.
You will find that in places where the liberals do not win they are typically in 2nd place.
that is what is meant by being strong everywhere.

With all due respect, you are not only incorrect, but you are sounding delusional. 70% of Canadians live east of Manitoba. How did the Conservative win the popular vote if they hardly received any votes except for Western Canada, as you claim?
 

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Need some advice please.
by nickbroken | Apr 26th, 2011