What Do You Love About Canada? (And What Don't You Love?)


SirJosephPorter
#31
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

You would have been fascinated by how the communities of Winnipeg used to deal with "ethnic" issues. The short answer is, they didn't. They just let people be people and the variety of ethnic communities in that city was (and maybe still is) nothing short of staggering. They had their own social clubs that used to "hop" with people having a great time. Hell, their annual Folklorama celebration is a sight to behold. Nowadays, we have lots more government involvement, laws, regulations, enforced political correctness, and a host of other wonderful things to enhance and nurture the lifestyles of all. I guess that's why we're not a "melting pot", like those nasty and rough ol' Americans down there! Sheesh...

That is precisely what is meant by the mosaic, counrtyboy. We let people be people they are free to practice their own culture, their own customs (provided they don’t conflict with our constitution, of course).

And they do have the melting pot model in USA, just that it is not working as it should, people are not that willing to give up their culture, their customs. While in the last century the European immigrants were willing to forego their culture, customs for the American melting pot, the new immigrants (Mexicans and third world immigrants) are less willing to do so.

Melting pot - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Incidentally in USA, I lived in Salt Lake City (the land of Mormons), Ann Arbor and Cincinnati.
 
lone wolf
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

When you go to Montreal, you are getting far away form Southern Ontario, you are near Ottawa there (winters are tougher in Ottawa as well).

And ‘tornado alley’? Really? We haven’t had too many tornadoes for a long time now. What we usually get is the aftermath of the tornadoes after they devastate the Southern coasts of USA. Thus we got aftermaths of hurricanes Andrew, Hugo etc (all we got was a bit of rain).

Ontario may have plenty of ugly weather, Southern Ontario has very little.

And yes, in summer we do have the choice, stay inside the air conditioned house, or escape to the cottage country to the north.

In fact we know at least four doctors who came to Ontario from Saskatchewan, the main reason they gave was the weather (and maybe they make more money in Ontario, I don't know).


Tornado? Hurricane? You do know they are different monsters, don't you?

One tornado is too many for the right people....
 
countryboy
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

That is precisely what is meant by the mosaic, counrtyboy. We let people be people they are free to practice their own culture, their own customs (provided they don’t conflict with our constitution, of course).

And they do have the melting pot model in USA, just that it is not working as it should, people are not that willing to give up their culture, their customs. While in the last century the European immigrants were willing to forego their culture, customs for the American melting pot, the new immigrants (Mexicans and third world immigrants) are less willing to do so.

Melting pot - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Incidentally in USA, I lived in Salt Lake City (the land of Mormons), Ann Arbor and Cincinnati.

Hey, I went to school in Ann Arbor (Michigan U...what else?) Are you familiar with the "Gandy Dancer" restaurant? Might not be there anymore..

OK, so here's my point. I have really been fortunate to have moved around Canada and the U.S. a lot...in many little corners of both countries. I spent a lot of time in Minneapolis (worked for a company based there) but lots of time in other places. Some international stuff too...Paris and Tokyo (6+ years there)...

What I saw in the U.S. was quite the opposite of a "melting pot"...I certainly know what that means but I saw so many very interesting cultural pockets and not really any "put-downs" of any culture. I still can't get my head around this melting pot thing. You said "We let people be people they are free to practice their own culture, their own customs (provided they don’t conflict with our constitution, of course)" and that's what I saw down there...all over the place. Please...tell me where you saw that. Was it San Fransisco's Chinatown? The Hispanic culture in California? The Mennonites in Pennsylvania? Frankenmuth, MI? (Big German culture and Christmastown, USA)...where? Hell, I've even spoken Japanese with a few people down in Seattle and nobody seemed to care what we spoke.

I think that big ol' Statue of Liberty actually has a lot of meaning to the thousands (millions?) of people who chose America as their new home. Even today.

I know a lot of Americans personally...probably hundreds, and I have never encountered any serious opposition to new Americans and their particular cultures. At least, no more than exists here in Canada...and it DOES exist here, believe me.

I think we're pretty good and making new Canadian feel welcome here, but I simply don't get this "holier than thou" attitude many of us seem to have in that department.
 
SirJosephPorter
#34
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

Hey, I went to school in Ann Arbor (Michigan U...what else?) Are you familiar with the "Gandy Dancer" restaurant? Might not be there anymore..

I worked at University of Michigan for six months, in 1977. I am not familiar with ‘Gandy Dancer’. When were you in Ann Arbor? I remember an Indian restaurant there, ‘Raja Rani’ (it means king and queen). I also remember ‘Pagoda’ restaurant, it was just off campus and used to be a hang out of university students. I don’t know if it is still in existence.

I lived in Salt lake City, the society was quite homogenous there in 1the 70s. It was a true melting pot, people from all different backgrounds (all European, of course) came to salt Lake City and became Americans. While there were a few ethnic restaurants, there were not that many separate enclaves of different ethnic groups. There were very few blacks in Salt Lake City in those days. It illustrated the melting pot model perfectly.

University of Michigan of course, was very cosmopolitan, as are most universities. There was a substantial population of German extraction in Cincinnati, but again, there were no German enclaves. Cincinnati was also a melting pot.

In those days, there were very few Mexicans or third world immigrants in these places, they used to congregate mostly in big cities such as New York. The melting pot model started to really break down with Hispanics and third world immigrants.
 
SirJosephPorter
#35
countryboy, I decided look up those restaurants, just for the sake of nostalgia. I could not find the Pagoda restaurant. Either it doesn’t exist or they don’t have a website.

Raja Rani, however, is very much in existence, after more than 30 years, and they do have a website.

Raja Rani Restaurant
 
countryboy
#36
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

countryboy, I decided look up those restaurants, just for the sake of nostalgia. I could not find the Pagoda restaurant. Either it doesn’t exist or they don’t have a website.

Raja Rani, however, is very much in existence, after more than 30 years, and they do have a website.

Raja Rani Restaurant

Will check that website...thanks. I seem to remember that the Gandy Dancer might have been called the Pagoda at one time. It was in an old train station, I think. Last time I was in Ann Arbor was around 1984, taking a bunch of executive business courses (for us workin' types). The food was very good, as I recall.

By the way, I always screw up the name of the University (of Michigan) because everyone used to call it the "U of M" but I couldn't do that...I came from Manitoba and the real U of M is there...the University of Manitoba. But at least I never called it Michigan State...they wouldn't go for that in Ann Arbor!
 
SirJosephPorter
#37
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

Will check that website...thanks. I seem to remember that the Gandy Dancer might have been called the Pagoda at one time. It was in an old train station, I think. Last time I was in Ann Arbor was around 1984, taking a bunch of executive business courses (for us workin' types). The food was very good, as I recall.

Then that probably is the old Pagoda restaurant.
 
countryboy
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

I worked at University of Michigan for six months, in 1977. I am not familiar with ‘Gandy Dancer’. When were you in Ann Arbor? I remember an Indian restaurant there, ‘Raja Rani’ (it means king and queen). I also remember ‘Pagoda’ restaurant, it was just off campus and used to be a hang out of university students. I don’t know if it is still in existence.

I lived in Salt lake City, the society was quite homogenous there in 1the 70s. It was a true melting pot, people from all different backgrounds (all European, of course) came to salt Lake City and became Americans. While there were a few ethnic restaurants, there were not that many separate enclaves of different ethnic groups. There were very few blacks in Salt Lake City in those days. It illustrated the melting pot model perfectly.

University of Michigan of course, was very cosmopolitan, as are most universities. There was a substantial population of German extraction in Cincinnati, but again, there were no German enclaves. Cincinnati was also a melting pot.

In those days, there were very few Mexicans or third world immigrants in these places, they used to congregate mostly in big cities such as New York. The melting pot model started to really break down with Hispanics and third world immigrants.

So what's better...a melting pot or a mosaic? I know quite a few immigrant families both here and in the U.S. and in most (if not all) cases, they made the choice to move "here" to become part of the society. If in fact a melting pot does exist in the U.S. somewhere these days, what would be so bad about that?

After all, it is the "land of the free and home of the brave" and I know anyone has the freedom of speech and a whole bunch of other stuff. Just look at the staggering array of restaurants in NYC - given that restaurants are usually one of the "faces" of the culture and I can't see too many "melting pot negatives" there.

In fact, I get a bit uncomfortable when I see a few people that move to Canada and then try to get laws changed to suit their own requirements. I don't agree with that at all. If their choice is to move to Canada, then be prepared to live under the existing umbrella. If there are enough of any certain group in an area, certain key business services will conform to their customers' requirements anyway...I see ATMs down in Richmond, BC with keypads in Chinese...works for me.

I lived in Japan for a number of years and I certainly didn't expect Japan to start changing things around just because I had arrived on the scene. Hey, if I needed help with the lingo (like when getting a drivers licence) you just find somebody to give you a hand. They even have bars and restaurants there that have signs (in English, sort of) out front that say, "No Gaijin"...that means no foreigners welcome. Was I offended? Nope! I just went to the next one.

By our standards, there is a fair amount of racial prejudice over there but it doesn't bother the foreigners. "We" simply didn't go looking for trouble.

Mind you, Japan has a very clear sense of who they are (I believe it's known as an "identity") and I maintain that we do not. In Japan, if you don't like it, you leave. I know that's a fairly horrifying thought to the average liberal-type in Canada, but it's pretty common out there in the world. What's that old expression, "When in Rome...?" Once again, works for me.

Last but not least, having lived in foreign countries and having done business in many others, the thing that really gets under my skin is when some Canadians begin to talk about imposing our standards on other countries. That is part of what I mean when I rant on about our "holier than thou" attitudes, arrogance, and all that other stuff. I think it's rude and insensitive to begin making all kinds of statements about how other countries do things. Most, if not all of them have been around a lot longer than Canada (we're a puppy in "world years") and most of them know what they're doing. If we didn't have all the natural resources that we do have (and waste, to some degree), we wouldn't be enjoying such a high standard of living.

If might interest some Canadians to know that the U.S. is held in very high regard by most Japanese. People in their 50s will take you around Tokyo and point out things that "General MacCarthur" built for them during the occupation after WWII. You don't often hear about the proverbial "ugly American" in Japan and in fact, you would hear a lot of good things about them. America is a big player on the world stage, and far more generous than we might give them credit for...they spend more on foreign aid (per capita) than we do. It goes on and on, but I'm more than a bit tired of the America-bashing that I keep hearing about here. Just had to mention it...
Last edited by countryboy; Dec 4th, 2009 at 10:46 PM..
 
AnnaG
#39
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

OK, I'll bite - what's an "antis?" Seriously, I live out in the woods so I'm not the sharpest tack in the box...I really don't know what that means.

Anti-American. lol Meaning "other than American".

Quote:

anti-

Quote:

L. anti- from Gk. anti "against, opposite, instead of," from PIE *anti (see ante).

Online etymology dictionary
 
countryboy
#40
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

Anti-American. lol Meaning "other than American".

[url="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=anti-"] Online etymology dictionary

Jeez, that was too simple! Thanks! I'm an "anti" too...anti-stupidity, anti-laziness, anti-arrogance, well...the list is long.
 
Mowich
#41
What I love about Canada.
Good: The CFL
Bad: TSN broadcasts of CFL games.
 
countryboy
#42
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

What I love about Canada.
Good: The CFL
Bad: TSN broadcasts of CFL games.

Good: The Weather (sometimes)
Bad: The Weather (sometimes)
 
L Gilbert
#43
I'm just going to quote wifey here:
Quote:

If I believed in countries and stuff I'd say my Canadian identity is that I was born here. My education has been a Canadian one. No other country is like Canada. Right down to the variety of people shown in the demographics, Canada is distinct. We are generally a peaceful people for one thing. That alone distinguishes us from other countries like England, China, Japan, USA, Russia, Israel, Viet Nam, etc. We are a relatively northern people. That narrows the field down even more. We are fairly technologically advanced - the field narrows further. We are slightly on the liberal side of center. We are good samaritans and help people in need. And so on. We are what we are, which is a combination of all the factors I have mentioned and more. We are a specific type of mutt. No other people have that combination of factors. Perhaps we are mediocre, perhaps not. Do we excel in some things? I think so. We've produced some pretty fine poets, scientists, medicine people, etc. and we still have people becoming prominent.
Superficial? Hardly. Superficial would be branding us as a mixed bag of colors with nothing to distinguish one of our cultures from another. Only someone that cannot think would not be able to say what we are.

- AG
 
TMan
#44
Good: Canada is the greatest country in the world.
Worst: Quebec is still a part of Canada.
 
lone wolf
#45
Good.... We all have the right to express an opinion

Bad.... We all do
 
Mowich
#46
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

Good.... We all have the right to express an opinion

Bad.... We all do

That is so true, lone wolf but part of what makes this forum such an interesting place to spend time.

But then, that's just my opinion.
 
countryboy
#47
Good: We are a caring people who welcome foreigners to our land.

Bad: We'll let anybody in.
 
lone wolf
#48
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

That is so true, lone wolf but part of what makes this forum such an interesting place to spend time.

But then, that's just my opinion.

I can't argue with that.
 
talloola
#49
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

What I love about Canada.
Good: The CFL
Bad: TSN broadcasts of CFL games.

If you watch the game, but turn down the volume, and listen on team1040, (our local one in Vancouver), the broadcast is much moreknowledgeable and interesting, as long as voice and picture are same.Can't stand Rod Black doing any sports at all.I've tried to do that with nhl games, but they are not melding into each other properly, so it doesn't work.
 
countryboy
#50
Good: Curling on TV
Bad: TSN doing the broadcasting

(Thanks for the reminder, Mowich)
 
Liberalman
#51
I love when Canadians use EEEh and You Know when they talk.

I really hate the rats in Alberta
 
countryboy
#52
Quote: Originally Posted by Liberalman View Post

I love when Canadians use EEEh and You Know when they talk.

I really hate the rats in Alberta

Both of them? (the rats)...

Good: The colorful language(s) of Newfoundland
Bad: I can only understand some of it (less, in a bar!)
 
Mowich
#53
Quote: Originally Posted by talloola View Post

If you watch the game, but turn down the volume, and listen on team1040, (our local one in Vancouver), the broadcast is much moreknowledgeable and interesting, as long as voice and picture are same.Can't stand Rod Black doing any sports at all.I've tried to do that with nhl games, but they are not melding into each other properly, so it doesn't work.

It is not the commentators that bug me, talloola, it is the video broadcast. I learned to tune out most commentators long ago. TSN is using the same camera techniques they do when broadcasting NFL games, I know, I checked. In the NFL, for some reason, fans like to have eternal close-ups of the coaches faces, or the guys on the field. They also concentrate on field close-ups instead of showing the entire field.
I couldn't care less about seeing the coaches face during a game, even our dear Rider coach, Ken Miller can wait till half-time or after the game. Likewise, I am not interested in seeing every little grimace on a players face after a play or the camera stuck in the face of receiver who just ran the ball back for 60 yards and is catching his breath.
Give me the broadcasts of CBC with their overview of the field so one can see the sidelines and know where the ball is being placed. Give me on field action every second of the game, as the action doesn't always stop when the ball is whistled dead. TSN just doesn't deliver.
 
SirJosephPorter
#54
Quote: Originally Posted by TMan View Post

Good: Canada is the greatest country in the world.
Worst: Quebec is still a part of Canada.


I have noticed one thing in this tread. While posters have posted what is good about Canada, nobody has really been able to come up with something really bad about Canada. When I posted that I really cannot think of anything bad (about Canada), most posters seem to be in agreement.

No doubt there have been scandals, injustices etc. in Canada. However, there is very little that is institutionally, intrinsically bad about Canada.
 
countryboy
#55
Quote: Originally Posted by SirJosephPorter View Post

I have noticed one thing in this tread. While posters have posted what is good about Canada, nobody has really been able to come up with something really bad about Canada. When I posted that I really cannot think of anything bad (about Canada), most posters seem to be in agreement.

No doubt there have been scandals, injustices etc. in Canada. However, there is very little that is institutionally, intrinsically bad about Canada.

Or it could be that this forum is just loaded with a bunch of patriotic positive people that don't like to dwell on the negatives. Whatever the reason, I agree, there are lots of good things we can be proud of here in Canuck-land.
 
countryboy
#56
Good: We invented the snowblower
Bad: We get too much snow
 
lone wolf
#57
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

Good: We invented the snowblower
Bad: We get too much snow

What's REALLY scary is the snowblower/rotary snowplow concept were created by an Orangeville DENTIST!
 
JLM
#58
Quote: Originally Posted by countryboy View Post

Good: We invented the snowblower
Bad: We get too much snow

Good - opportunity for those with ambition, ingenuity and energy.
Bad- devisiveness between different geographic regions.
 
countryboy
#59
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

What's REALLY scary is the snowblower/rotary snowplow concept were created by an Orangeville DENTIST!

Ouch! Is there a specific phobia to describe the fear of a snowblower in your mouth!?!?
 
countryboy
#60
Good: We have a big country with tons of natural resources

Bad: We don't use those resources to establish ourselves as the world leader in environmental stewardship (which, if done right, could become our own "economic miracle", a la Japan with cars and electronics)
 

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