You want to promote human rights in China?


White_Unifier
#1
Free copies of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in American hotels | Crazy Ideas Bank

A copy of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in hotel rooms. Not a bad idea. Have it in Chinese too to target Chinese tourists.

And have a copy in English too to educate traveling Nazis.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

Free copies of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in American hotels | Crazy Ideas Bank

A copy of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in hotel rooms. Not a bad idea. Have it in Chinese too to target Chinese tourists.

And have a copy in English too to educate traveling Nazis.

How about an Arabic translation for the visiting Saudis?
 
White_Unifier
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

How about an Arabic translation for the visiting Saudis?

Good idea! Given that the declaration is actually quite short, we could easily fit it into a single booklet in all six of the UN's official languages.

The Saudis might hate us for that though.

Oh yes, definitely include a French translation for the militant Bill-101 activists too.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

Good idea! Given that the declaration is actually quite short, we could easily fit it into a single booklet in all six of the UN's official languages.

The Saudis might hate us for that though.

Oh yes, definitely include a French translation for the militant Bill-101 activists too.

Better put it before the English version in the booklet.
 
White_Unifier
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Better put it before the English version in the booklet.

You got a quick mind tonight.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

You got a quick mind tonight.

... like wounded deer through the woods ...
 
HarperCons
#7
crazyideasbank.com is where i get all my objective information from
 
White_Unifier
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by HarperCons View Post

crazyideasbank.com is where i get all my objective information from

Give credit where credit is due. With the rise of craziness in the world today, it might not be a bad idea to include a copy of the UDHR alongside the hotel-room Guideon Bible.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#9
yeah, and put it right beside the one child policy condoms
 
White_Unifier
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

yeah, and put it right beside the one child policy condoms

Canada has no one-child policy.
 
MHz
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

... like wounded deer through the woods ...

If you get wounded you never were very fast.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#12
JT and Freeland just can't keep their nose out of other countries business

China says butt out; Canada says free Muslims

Quote:

OTTAWA - Canada stood firm against Chinese criticism Thursday after the Trudeau government rallied more than a dozen countries in expressing concern to Beijing about its jailing of hundreds of thousands of its Muslim minority.
A Chinese foreign ministry spokeswoman accused Canada's envoy and 14 others of going beyond their diplomatic roles by sending a letter that expressed concern about the incarcerations of China's Muslim minorities in re-education camps in the northwestern region of Xinjiang.
Spokeswoman Hua Chunying told reporters the letter violated the terms of the Vienna Convention governing diplomatic relations and that the envoys should not "interfere in the internal affairs of other countries."
She noted the letter, which was spearheaded by Canada, was based on hearsay, despite widely distributed reports from detainees, relatives and officials documenting the sweeping and seemingly arbitrary detentions.
A well-placed source from one of the 15 signatory countries also confirmed to The Canadian Press that Canada led the effort to send the letter.
The United Nations estimates as many as one million Uighurs and other predominantly Muslim minorities are being held in arbitrary detention.
"Canada is deeply concerned by credible reports of the mass detention, repression and surveillance of Uighurs and other Muslims in Xinjiang," said Adam Austen, a spokesman for Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland.
Canada called on China to release all "arbitrarily" detained Muslims earlier this month at the UN where China's human rights record was under review. Freeland also raised their plight with her Chinese counterpart at the UN General Assembly in September, said Austen.
"Canada also regularly raises concerns about Xinjiang with Chinese authorities both publicly and privately, bilaterally and multilaterally, and will continue to do so," said Austen.
But Canada is now part of a shrinking group of countries that are speaking out against China. Of the 130 countries that commented on China's human rights record at the UN review, only 15 mentioned Xinjiang, said Paul Evans, a China expert at the University of British Columbia.
China's hardline response to the letter places it on "a collision course with Western values of freedom of religion, Western values on culture," Evans said.
"This is the old Chinese hammer, and it does not look very good in the context of 2018. The absence of transparency on this, the disinformation that has been circulated by the Chinese side — whatever your political position on this one, it makes you grit your teeth," said Evans.
The letter emerged one day after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau held a decidedly low-key version of his third-annual leaders' summit with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang on the margins of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations leaders' summit in Singapore.
The one-hour meeting in a third country represented a downgrade compared to their two previous leaders' summits — part of a high-profile initiative to reinvigorate Sino-Canadian relations — that saw Trudeau feted in Beijing and 2017 after Li was wined and dined in Ottawa a year earlier.
With a push towards free trade talks all but stalled, Trudeau was unapologetic when asked about Canada's leadership role on the contentious letter, and whether it whether it would undermine his government's pursuit of more trade with China.
"This is something that we do at the same time as we engage in constructive and positive trade talks," Trudeau said, adding that he raised questions and concerns about the plight of Muslims in his meeting with Li.
"Canada will continue to look for ways to advance and promote human rights in partnership with our like-minded allies everywhere around the world."
A former Canadian ambassador to China and a human rights advocate said it was about time somebody spoke up for its embattled Muslim minority regardless of the economic consequences.
"Having ambassadors address this issue directly and openly is far better than attempting to influence the domestic affairs of another country covertly, which has been China's preferred tactic in recent years," said David Mulroney, Canada's ambassador to China from 2009 to 2012.
Mulroney, who has urged Canada to push for deeper economic ties with China and its Asian neighbours, said Canada still needs to find "the courage to flag concerns about China's increasingly irresponsible behaviour" under its newly assertive President Xi Jinping.
"As we get deeper into the Xi Jinping era, and as concerns grow about issues such as China's brutal crackdown on Uighurs and other minorities and its increasingly aggressive interference abroad, the scope of the bilateral relationship begins to shrink."
Alex Neve, the head of Amnesty International Canada, said he was surprised to read about Canada's leadership role in sending the letter because he's grown accustomed to human rights concerns taking a back seat to trade and investment.
"China is feeling bruised. China is concerned, and that's precisely the moment at which governments need to maintain pressure."

And the funny part is that they still believe a trade deal can be made
 
Hoid
#13
The Chinese who need to hear about human rights will never be anywhere near an American hotel.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

JT and Freeland just can't keep their nose out of other countries business
China says butt out; Canada says free Muslims
And the funny part is that they still believe a trade deal can be made

Wouldn't it be great if they kept their mouths shut about other countries, like you do?
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#15
Does my opinions on a Canadian forum bother you?
 
Tecumsehsbones
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Does my opinions on a Canadian forum bother you?

Nope, they amuse me.
 
MHz
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

The Chinese who need to hear about human rights will never be anywhere near an American hotel.

I could do a death total caused by the military of each country since about 1950, I can assure you that you will not like the results.
 
JamesBondo
#18
. . . .
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#19
China demands release of Huawei exec

Quote:

VANCOUVER - Chinese officials are demanding that Canada release Huawei Technologies' chief financial officer, who was arrested in Vancouver over the weekend and faces possible extradition to the United States.
Foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters Thursday that the Chinese government also wants Canadian officials to reveal the reasoning behind Meng Wanzhou's arrest Saturday.
He also said Meng's legal rights must be ensured, adding that neither Canadian nor American officials had so far responded to China's concerns.
The comments come after China's embassy in Ottawa issued a statement Wednesday calling Meng's arrest a serious violation of human rights.
"(Canada) arrested a Chinese citizen (who did not violate) any Canadian or American law," the statement said.
"We will closely follow the development of the issue and take all measures to resolutely protect the legitimate rights and interests of Chinese citizens."
Meanwhile, a clerk at the B.C. Supreme Court said Meng appeared in court Wednesday and a bail hearing is scheduled for Friday.
Canadian Justice Department spokesman Ian McLeod said the U.S. is seeking Meng's extradition, but couldn't provide further details about the case because a publication ban is in effect at Meng's request.
Meng was changing flights in Canada when she was detained "on behalf of the United States of America" to face "unspecified charges" in New York, Huawei said in a statement.
"The company has been provided very little information regarding the charges and is not aware of any wrongdoing by Ms. Meng," the statement said. "The company believes the Canadian and U.S. legal systems will ultimately reach a just conclusion."
In April, China appealed to Washington to avoid damaging business confidence following a Wall Street Journal report that U.S. authorities were allegedly investigating whether Huawei violated sanctions on Iran amid spiralling technology tensions.
That same month, Washington barred Huawei rival ZTE Corp. from exporting U.S. technology in a separate case over exports to Iran and North Korea.
In its statement Wednesday, Huawei said the company complies with all laws and regulations in the countries where it operates, including applicable export control, sanction laws and regulations of the United Nations, the United States and the European Union.
Huawei, the biggest global supplier of network gear used by phone and internet companies, has been the target of deepening U.S. security concerns. Under U.S. President Donald Trump and his predecessor, Barack Obama, Washington has pressured European countries and other allies to limit the use of its technology.
The U.S. sees Huawei and smaller Chinese tech suppliers as possible fronts for Chinese spying and as commercial competitors. The Trump administration says they benefit from improper subsidies and market barriers.
David Mulroney, a former Canadian ambassador to China, said U.S. and Canadian business executives could face reprisals in China.
"That's something we should be watching out for. It's a possibility. China plays rough," Mulroney told The Associated Press. "It's a prominent member of their society and it's a company that really embodies China's quest for global recognition as a technology power."
Mulroney said Canada should be prepared for "sustained fury" from the Chinese and said it will be portrayed in China as Canada kowtowing to Trump. He also said the Iran allegations are very damaging to Huawei and said China will push back hard.
U.S. Sen. Ben Sasse, a Republican member of the Senate armed services and banking committees, applauded Canada for the arrest.
"Americans are grateful that our Canadian partners have arrested the chief financial officer of a giant Chinese telecom company for (allegedly) breaking U.S. sanctions against Iran," he said.
Meng is a prominent member of Chinese society as deputy chairwoman of the Huawei board and the daughter of company founder Ren Zhengfei.

 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+2
#20  Top Rated Post
Karma is a bitch, Freeland not tweet dictating about human rights in China right now, how come?

Status of Huawei CFO's husband questioned as he tries to post bail for wealthy wife

Quote:

What does $15 million mean to the daughter of a Chinese telecom billionaire? And what kind of hold will two Vancouver properties — no matter how pricey — exert on her husband?
After two days of argument in B.C. Supreme Court, the answers to those questions are likely to prove crucial Tuesday as a judge decides whether or not to grant bail to Huawei Technologies chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou.
Justice William Ehrcke reserved judgment on a proposal for the 46-year-old's release Monday after a day of arguments stressing the unique nature of a situation resulting in the spectacle of one of China's most powerful women bargaining for her freedom as she awaits possible extradition to the United States for allegedly violating trade sanctions against Iran.
"They could lose 15 million and go on with their life, and their lifestyle wouldn't be appreciably different." Ehrcke noted as he asked questions of Crown and defence lawyers at the end of the day.
"I want all the help that counsel can give me."
'I say that is a serious offence'
According to a summary of facts filed with the court, Meng is accused of repeatedly lying to financial institutions about the relationship between Huawei and a company called Skycom that did business in Iran in violation of international sanctions.
U.S. prosecutors claim "Huawei operated Skycom as an unofficial subsidiary to conduct business in Iran while concealing Skycom's link to Huawei."
Meng is the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei. She serves as deputy chairwoman of the company's board and served on the board of Skycom in 2008 and 2009.
As a result of her alleged lies, prosecutors contend that the banks she dealt with were "induced into carrying out transactions that they otherwise would not have contemplated." Those transactions put them on the wrong side of the international community.
"I say that is a serious offence," said federal Crown counsel John Gibb-Carsley. "That's assisting Iran in violation of the sanctions."

'Global interest will be triggered'
From the outset of the bail proceedings last week, Meng's lawyer predicted that the stature of his client would trigger global interest in the case.
The first appearance happened in a virtually empty courtroom. CBC News has listened to a recording of the initial hearing, in which David Martin argued successfully for a temporary publication ban.
He likened the case to the arrest of Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg. "That kind of global interest will be triggered," he said.
A week later, a wall of cameras sat at the steps of the B.C. Supreme Court building in downtown Vancouver. Reporters from New York to Japan have requested accreditation.
The lineup to get inside the secure courtroom built for the Air India trial stretched beyond a set of concrete steps to the next floor. Students did homework as they waited.
A man who claimed he graduated from school with Meng asked if he would be able to see her from the gallery. A woman claimed she once had dinner with Meng; she was worried about the toll on her health.

'Jailer in the community'
Inside the court, supporters and the curious packed the public gallery. Cellphones rang in violation of court rules as grim-faced sheriffs walked up and down the line telling the crowd not to take pictures.
Meng cut a strange figure when she arrived from Alouette Correctional Centre for Women in Maple Ridge.
She wore a shapeless green track suit but gave firm orders as she stood to direct an assistant who ran back and forth between the glass-enclosed prisoner's box and the tables holding a team of Meng's high-priced lawyers.
Her husband, venture capitalist Xiaozong Liu, sat in the front row of the public gallery a few metres away. A team of Huawei employees surrounded him.
Liu has offered to act as surety, putting up both his Vancouver homes as well as $1 million in cash, an amount totalling about $15 million.
But Martin and the judge struggled with the idea of a non-resident acting in a role described as being Meng's "jailer in the community."

'There always has to be a first time'

Gibb-Carsley also doubted Liu's ability to act as surety, given that his life — like Meng's — is almost entirely in China.
He questioned the assertion that the couple has meaningful ties to the local community. And he also noted that many of the photographs the couple filed with the court as proof of their Canadian lives were essentially tourist snaps.
"If Ms. Meng was to flee, Mr. Liu would not be left behind," Gibb-Carsley said.
The plan for Meng's potential release calls for round-the-clock physical surveillance combined with an electronic ankle monitor using GPS to mark her location. The heads of two security firms testified to the reliability of their products.
But Gibb-Carsley noted that neither man could guarantee Meng wouldn't escape. He asked them about the possibility of their electronic systems being compromised.
No matter how remote, he later told the judge, the court couldn't discount the possibility Meng might use her vast wealth and unique access to the world's most popular telecommunications technology to evade her captors.
"Is that the risk the court should take?" Gibb-Carsley asked the judge.
"There always has to be a first time," Ehrcke quipped.

Does Ottawa try to pressure the judge to release her on bail so she can slip away to China and screw over the US. do we take the financial hit from China with their threat of punishment? Tough spot for the Libs to be in especially after embarrassing themselves with the trade rejection over human rights progressive trade agreement, and an international tweet against the Chinese over human rights concerns of the detention/reeducation camps.
 
Hoid
#21
There is nothing tough about the "spot"

If the Americans presented us with reasonable proof of the allegations, we have no choice but to comply with their request.

We have an extradition treaty with them that is pretty straight forward.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#22
I agree, but China is trying hard to keep her from being extradited, we will pay the consequences as China will punish Canada. BTW she must be real important to the Chinese Gov. as they usually don't get this aggressive over their citizens in another country.
 
Hoid
#23
BTW if the government arrested her the evidence they were presented with must have been pretty iron clad.

The sad part is that it is likely to be over China circumventing the US sanctions against Iran - which Canada is also against.
 
petros
+2
#24
Espionage. Huawei is tits deep in it.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#25
Canada detained her for being a person of interest to the US DOJ as part of the agreement signed between the 2 countries, Canada is not prosecuting her the lawyers are working for the DOJ to have her extradited to the US. That is why China is mad at Canada she broke no Canadian laws, I can see her getting her bail then bailing on Canada in the middle of the night that's why the US payed lawyer's are arguing so hard on keeping her detained.
 
Hoid
#26
She was arrested in Canada under the terms of a long-standing extradition agreement. So she was in violation of Canadian law.

She is no flight threat.

that is ridiculous and that is Canada's fault that she is locked up like some sort of common crook.

I would expect her to be released on bail by the end of the day,
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

She was arrested in Canada under the terms of a long-standing extradition agreement. So she was in violation of Canadian law.
She is no flight threat.
that is ridiculous and that is Canada's fault that she is locked up like some sort of common crook.
I would expect her to be released on bail by the end of the day,

Why do I have to keep correcting you? Why are you so stubborn? From the article posted above

Quote:

Meng was changing flights in Canada when she was detained "on behalf of the United States of America" to face "unspecified charges" in New York, Huawei said in a statement.
"The company has been provided very little information regarding the charges and is not aware of any wrongdoing by Ms. Meng," the statement said. "The company believes the Canadian and U.S. legal systems will ultimately reach a just conclusion."

 
Hoid
#28
She is in Canadian jail because she did something that put her there.

Its not like she's there for nothing.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#29
Where else would she be detained in a secure facility? The Super 8?
 
Hoid
#30
Yes jail makes sense for people who are accused of breaking the law.
 

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