Trade WAR??!!

Ocean Breeze
Free Thinker
#1
Trump administration slaps tariffs on $50B US of China imports


China is retaliating....dollar for dollar.
Trump administration slaps tariffs on $50B US of China imports | CBC News

Meanwhile CDA , the EU seem unified in their retaliation against the US tariffs......dolar for dollar as well.


Trump administration slaps tariffs on $50B US of China imports | CBC News


Trump is determined t provoke everyone on the planet EXCEPT his pals , Kim and Putin. America likes to start wars. but this one is going to hurt Americans too..... as the retalilations from china are tar getting Trump territory.
 
Walter
#2
Yer funny.
 
Ocean Breeze
Free Thinker
#3

China retaliates after U.S. announces $50 billion in tariffs, escalating trade war


China announced retaliatory tariffs designed to hit President Trump��s supporters in farm states and the industrial Midwest. The measures, announced barely an hour after the White House went ahead with a 25-percent import tax on $50 billion of Chinese imports to the United States, brought the world��s two biggest economies closer to the tit-for-tat trade war that business leaders and Republicans in Congress fear.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/busin...ational&wpmk=1
 
White_Unifier
#4
Canada should adopt unilateral free trade with the world.
 
Ocean Breeze
Free Thinker
#5
How U.S. tariffs on cars could hit Canadians

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/u-s...-world-evening
 
petros
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

Canada should adopt unilateral free trade with the world.

That's not possible.

Quote: Originally Posted by Ocean Breeze View Post

How U.S. tariffs on cars could hit Canadians

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/u-s...-world-evening

No biggie, I already drive US built vehicles.
 
White_Unifier
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Ocean Breeze View Post

How U.S. tariffs on cars could hit Canadians

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/u-s...-world-evening

Just because Trump wants impose import taxes on its consumer doesn't mean we need to do the same. Just because the US insists on shooting itself in the foot doesn't mean we need to follow in its footsteps.

The best thing Canada could do economically is to adopt a policy of unilateral global free trade.

Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

That's not possible.

Why not? Three governments have done so already and the UK is presently debating it.
 
petros
#8
Get a dictionary and look up the definition of the prefix uni.
 
White_Unifier
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Get a dictionary and look up the definition of the prefix uni.

Right, uni-, one. In other words, we unilaterally drop all tariffs and subsidies. Nothing says we can do so only conditionally on another country reciprocating. If Trump wants to hurt his country's consumers, let him! We should not follow his lead on this.

https://clearit.ca/canadian-customs-...al-free-trade/
 
petros
+1
#10
In our global world how would you trade unilaterally when components of products can come from dozens of countries? How about when dealing with trade blocks like the EU or Russian Federation?

What do you do about dumping or inferior products?
 
White_Unifier
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

In our global world how would you trade unilaterally when components of products can come from dozens of countries? How about when dealing with trade blocks like the EU or Russian Federation?

What do you do about dumping or inferior products?

Well, firstly, there would already be three countries we could trade unilaterally with: Singapore, Hong, Kong, and New Zealand.

Secondly, unililateral free trade does not have to replace agreements: the two can complement one another. It's just that the dynamic is a little different. Rather than say 'we'll lower our tariffs if you lower yours,' they might say 'we've already lowered our tariffs against you so what are you willing to give in return?'. They can also spend less time negotiating tariffs and subsidies and spend more time negotiating common product standards and other unintentional trade barriers for example.

Also, some countries might be more willing to drop more tariffs against a unilateral free-trading nation as a gesture of good will, so negotiations could be quicker and more comprehensive. And the UK is presently debating the matter of unilateral global free trade too.
 
petros
+1
#12
That's not the world Poopsie.

As a good will jester we would should import Botswanan goods even if they don't meet our safety codes?
 
White_Unifier
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

That's not the world Poopsie.

As a good will jester we would should import Botswanan goods even if they don't meet our safety codes?

You're confusing free trade with the maintenance of standards. Obviously the imported product must still meet our standards. The point of free trade is that as long as it does meet our standards, we let it in without intentional barriers.

As for dumping, Canadian consumers should welcome it.
 
petros
+1
#14
So to stave off importers importing unsafe goods what do you recommend?

Fines?

Why should people lose their jobs to get cheaper goods?
 
White_Unifier
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

So to stave off importers importing unsafe goods what do you recommend?

Fines?

Why should people lose their jobs to get cheaper goods?

What? Hong Kong will start dumping cheap gas and maple syrup on us?
 
petros
#16
Syrup-Makers Outraged by All the Fake
 
White_Unifier
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Syrup-Makers Outraged by All the Fake

Again, you're confusing free trade with the maintenance of standards. If a country is dumping a product that doesn't meet our standards, we could react according to circumstances. If it's totally out of control, we could block imports of that product until that country raises its standards (notice, no tariffs, just outright blocked since it doesn't meet our standards) or we inspect at the border on a case by case basis.

Hong Kong, Singapore, and new Zealand have been doing this for a while now. If Canada needs help to implement it, we could just hire an expert from Hong Kong to advise us on how to implement it.

Now that I think about it, that's already the case in Canada. Only products that meet Canadian standards can presently legally enter Canada. The only question is whether they enter visa-free or not. Under unilateral global free trade, once it's determined that they meet our standards, we let them in visa-free. I assume we already have border guards keeping heroin out of the country, no?

That wouldn't change under unilateral global free trade. What would change is that once deemed to meet the same standard as domestic products are expected to meet, they can enter visa-free and we don't subsidize our own.

https://policyexchange.org.uk/wp-con...Free-Trade.pdf
 
petros
+1
#18
I'm trying to get the point of tarrifs across but you can't grasp the mechanics of them
 
White_Unifier
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

I'm trying to get the point of tarrifs across but you can't grasp the mechanics of them

Why would we let a product into the country that does not meet the standards just because the importer paid a tariff on it? If it doesn't meet our standards, we should just not allow it in.
 
Walter
#20
Two question marks and two exclamation marks means it’s really important.
 
petros
+1
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

Why would we let a product into the country that does not meet the standards just because the importer paid a tariff on it? If it doesn't meet our standards, we should just not allow it in.

So you are for Trump's tarrifs on steel and aluminium then.

Good to know.
 
White_Unifier
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

So you are for Trump's tarrifs on steel and aluminium then.

Good to know.

No I'm not, because it hurts US consumers. But if he's determined to hurt US consumers, what are we to do about it? How does hurting Canadian consumers help US consumers? All that does it hurt us all. So yes, let Trump raise taxes on his consumers. We don't need to follow his example on this.
 
petros
#23
So you want the shitty steel pipe in your local chemical plant, vehicle and various other industrial and consumer goods?
 
White_Unifier
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

So you want the shitty steel pipe in your local chemical plant, vehicle and various other industrial and consumer goods?

If the foreign steel doesn't meet Canadian domestic standards, it won't be allowed in period, not because of protectionism but because foreign products must still meet the same standards as equivalent Canadian products.

Again, you're confusing free trade with the enforcement of domestic standards.
 
petros
#25
Thats what both Canada and the US have been trying to do but Trump got pissed because it was funneled through Canada.
 
White_Unifier
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Thats what both Canada and the US have been trying to do but Trump got pissed because it was funneled through Canada.

Canada does not have unilateral free trade. If we did, we'd have no tariffs and subsidies. We'd merely block entry to product that don't meet Canadian product or service standards.

as for Trump, he's not ticked because products of lower quality are entering the US through Canada. He's ticked because less expensive products are entering the US through Canada.

Of course the US can do what it wants, but if a product meets Canadian product standards, we should let it in tariff-free and not subsidize their local competitors.
 
petros
+1
#27
You still don't know why the US punished Canada?
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1 / -1
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

You still don't know why the US punished Canada?

Trump's ego couldn't stand for someone publically declaring that they won't be pushed around by him. It goes against everything that Trump stands for.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Trump's ego couldn't stand for someone publically declaring that they won't be pushed around by him. It goes against everything that Trump stands for.

So you don't think Canada and Mexico are complicit in making deals with foreign Countries/Companies manufactured goods to funnel into the states to side step U.S. tariffs to fit into the NAFTA agreement?

Mexico just a couple weeks ago stated that it was going to shield foreign vehicle manufactures and their agreements with them from the % of made in the U.S. material to be installed in vehicles sold in the U.S. So do you think the Mexico agreements with foreign auto makers were not made to benefit the foreign companies to get their vehicle into the states through NAFTA.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

So you don't think Canada and Mexico are complicit in making deals with foreign Countries/Companies manufactured goods to funnel into the states to side step U.S. tariffs to fit into the NAFTA agreement?

Mexico just a couple weeks ago stated that it was going to shield foreign vehicle manufactures and their agreements with them from the % of made in the U.S. material to be installed in vehicles sold in the U.S. So do you think the Mexico agreements with foreign auto makers were not made to benefit the foreign companies to get their vehicle into the states through NAFTA.

Oh, come on! The United States is just as complicit! They bring in auto parts from China and funnel them through to us in the form of automobiles. They bring in flat screens from Korea and funnel them to Canada in the form of lap-top computers. They bring in billions of $ of semi-conductors from all over the Pacific Rim and "dump" them on us in the form of finished electronics. That's the way the world works. Trump and Co. are about to find out that it is so intertwined that to punish us, China, Europe, Japan is to ultimately punish America. This mis-guided nationalism is going to cause a global recession.
 

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