Russia-U.S. "Relations" & Maneuverings


Twin_Moose
Conservative
#301
I was reading this morning how Russian back forces in Georgia would move the border at night by a few inches to feet, pretty sneaky.


I don't know what to say to do there, if NATO or the UN get aggressive and forces Russia to withdraw what's to stop the next Ukrainian Gov. from warming up to Russia and giving in. It's my heritage, but it's only been 40+ years since independence, Russia still scares the crap out of too much of the population yet, and still unpredictable politically.

I think they are doing it right and playing the long game with sanctions, Ukraine was oppressed for centuries a few more years might be needed to win outright.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#302
I was reading this morning how Russian back forces in Georgia would move the border at night by a few inches to feet, pretty sneaky.
The Russians have this strong need for more lebensraum because they are so short of land.

What a nasty bunch of schmucks, eh?
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#303
Yes, until a dozen years or so ago I just went by the stories passed down by the family how Ukraine and Russia relations/treatment was, when I started researching on my own my eyes were opened on how cruel a nation could be to it's people. Can also understand how people could be so deathly afraid of Gov.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#304
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Yes, until a dozen years or so ago I just went by the stories passed down by the family how Ukraine and Russia relations/treatment was, when I started researching on my own my eyes were opened on how cruel a nation could be to it's people. Can also understand how people could be so deathly afraid of Gov.

In some ways, they are incompetent and bavkwards. The GDP productivity of the average Russian is shout 1/10th that of the average Canadian. They've been fed tales of their glorious greatness as a people rather than to pursue peace, prosperity, security and health for their people.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#305
Being repressed for 70+ years, not allowed to think for yourself, not allowed to better your/families lives without it being stripped away or sent to the Gulag. Heavy drinking to medicate for depression, no say in your community would all add up to a populace of non caring slackers.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#306
Also their Scientists have brilliance in their simplicity, figure out some of the hardest problems with simple solutions is incredible IMO
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#307
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Being repressed for 70+ years, not allowed to think for yourself, not allowed to better your/families lives without it being stripped away or sent to the Gulag. Heavy drinking to medicate for depression, no say in your community would all add up to a populace of non caring slackers.


No doubt all that could be a bit of a downer! On top of that to have Pukin for your leader! Enough to piss off a "good humour man"
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#308
We are seeing it here in North America as well, lots of people slacking, self medicating with substances, with their hand out
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#309
Russian space program in 'crisis' as David Saint-Jacques set to blast off

Quote:

As Russia prepares to blast Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques into orbit next week, back on Earth, its space program is confronting existential questions about its ability to find a niche in a rapidly evolving sector and stay relevant.
Saint-Jacques' mission, his first trip into space, will also be the first manned trip to the International Space Station (ISS) since the failed Soyuz MS-10 launch on Oct. 11.
The Dec. 3 event will be a moment of reckoning for Roscosmos, Russia's version of NASA.
Russia's space agency is facing nothing short of an existential crisis, said Pavel Luzin, a space analyst and university professor in the Russian Ural city of Perm.
"I am afraid we are not a reliable partner for the U.S. and Europeans," said Luzin, who wrote his Ph.D on Russian and American space policy. "I see decline [and] a long-term crisis that is based on our inability to adapt our economics and scientific policy to a contemporary world."
Critics in Russia and abroad claim production and financial troubles, which have led to problems and launch failures in Roscosmos' unmanned space program, are now starting to affect its manned missions.
Luzin said the space program is especially important for President Vladimir Putin, as it's one of the few areas Russia can still make a case for being an equal of the United States.
'Ballistic descent'
October's Soyuz MS-10 mission ended in nail-biting fashion just two minutes into the flight, after the spacecraft's booster rockets failed to separate properly.
That automatically triggered the crew capsule's emergency escape system, sending the Russian and American astronauts on board plummeting back to earth at three times the usual velocity — a so-called "ballistic descent."
Russian investigators concluded a bent sensor designed to detect the separation of the booster rockets failed. The two-centimetre-long piece of metal was apparently damaged by mechanics or engineers during assembly on the launch pad.
"Thankfully, the engineers around the world have been working very hard to get to the bottom of what happened," Saint-Jacques told CBC in an interview in Moscow. "We are very confident now that we know what happened and we've found ways to make sure it doesn't happen again."
Hopefully so. But Russian engineers have also been trying to explain something they discovered in September: a hole drilled in the Russian orbiter section of the ISS.
At first, some Roscosmos leaders suggested it might have been a case of sabotage by U.S. astronauts on board the ISS. But it now appears to have been made on Earth, by someone at a Russian manufacturing plant who then tried to cover up their mistake.
Stolen money
A damning report released this week by the Kremlin's own auditors demonstrate just how, well, astronomical the financial and production problems with Russia's space program are.
The news agency RIA Novosti quoted Alexei Kudrin, the head of Russia's Accounts Chamber, as saying, "We have big problems with Roscosmos."
Kudrin suggested there has been mismanagement. "Several billions [of rubles] have been lost — that is, essentially stolen — and investigations are underway."
He told a Russian TV station that "irrational spending" abounds, with the agency paying inflated prices to contractors, and that Roscosmos somehow loses track of money for unfinished or idle projects.
On Tuesday, Russian prosecutors revealed they had launched 16 criminal cases against Roscosmos employees, involving everything from improper procurement and fraud to the delivery of faulty or poor-quality products.
The agency said more than 200 officials were involved in the violations. Among the most egregious instances cited by prosecutors was a reported $152 million US embezzled during construction of Russia's new space port in Vostochny, in the country's far east.
Essential cooperation
For at least the next year or so, Russia and the U.S. have no choice but to work together.
Since the winding down of NASA's Space Shuttle program, Russia's Soyuz rockets have been the only way of getting NASA astronauts — as well as others from Canada, Europe and Japan — up to the ISS.
The roughly $500 million US that NASA pays to Roscosmos each year for seats on the Soyuz, as well as for parts for other rockets, is a critical top-up of the $1.8 billion US budget Roscosmos receives from Putin's government.
But in late 2019, NASA plans to start shifting the job of transporting its astronauts to private U.S. companies that are developing cheaper, reusable rockets and eventually reusable crew capsules.
Pavel Luzin, the Perm space analyst, said firms such as Boeing, Elon Musk's SpaceX and Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin are poised to take over tasks now performed by Roscosmos. And the Russian agency has been unable to demonstrate it can compete with emerging space technologies.
"Russia's space industry still works like the Soviet space industry, and cannot work in a market environment."
In interviews with CBC, Roscosmos officials downplayed the challenges, and expressed optimism for the future.
"The more you fly, the more risk you have," said Sergei Krikalev, Roscosmos' director of manned spaceflight, who is overseeing Saint-Jacques' mission.
Krikalev expressed confidence in the investigation that followed the unsuccessful launch, and in the measures Roscosmos has implemented since.
"A lot of people are working to provide safety and reliability of the hardware," he said.
Krikalev said Roscosmos launched an unmanned cargo-carrying Soyuz rocket on Nov. 16 without incident, indicating the booster problem has been resolved.
Though relying on technology developed over 60 years ago, multiple variants of Soyuz rockets have been remarkably durable. Roscosmos had executed 53 straight successful manned launches before the October incident.
Important meeting ahead
Publicly, NASA officials have been supportive of Russia's efforts to deal with the Soyuz mishap, and expressed confidence in the Roscosmos management team.
But in an unusual step, NASA has asked the head of Roscosmos, Dmitry Rogozin, to come to the U.S. in early 2019 for a series of discussions about the future of cooperation in space.
A former Russian deputy prime minister who's closely connected to Putin, Rogozin is on the U.S. sanctions list and banned from travelling to the United States. His trip requires a special waiver from the U.S. State Department, which speaks to the importance NASA attaches to such face-to-face talks.
Rogozin has outlined ambitious plans for Russia's space program in the decades ahead. They include participating in the U.S. lunar space station proposal, developing new Angara heavy launch rockets and a reusable crew capsule called Federation that could one day take astronauts to Mars.
Despite a decade in development, the new heavy rocket program has had just one successful launch. There's no timetable for completion of the Federation. And a new spaceport in Russia's Far East that was meant to replace the Soviet-era Baikonur Cosmodrome (which Russia leases from Kazakhstan) is not able to handle manned launches.
David Saint-Jacques, who has spent the past two years learning Russian and training at Russia's Star City complex outside of Moscow, downplayed concerns about how Russia will fare in the years ahead.
"Russians are extremely proud of their accomplishments in space, and they have all good reasons to be proud," he said.
"There are so many new ways of getting into orbit that are coming up. And with all these players, I think we have a bright future."

To the bolded I could see a couple of patsies being sent to Siberia for a couple of years and the investigation will be over
 
Ocean Breeze
Free Thinker
-1
#310
‘Most of the GOP leadership has been compromised’ by Russian money: Trump biographer

https://www.rawstory.com/2018/11/gop..._notifications
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#311
I think you can lump in a bunch of Dems *cough*(Hitlary)*cough* in there as well OB
 
MHz
#312
Russian hand signal for 'Whoa, we are 'first-aiders, do you need help?''. 2 moving boats might mean this was a smart-shell.



http://www.naharnet.com/stories/en/2...-in-east-syria
The Islamic State group has fiercely defended its last holdout in eastern Syria against a more than two-month military offensive by a Kurdish-Arab alliance backed by a U.S.-led coalition.
After the Syrian Democratic Forces alliance successfully expelled the jihadists from other parts of war-torn Syria, why is this latest battle in the far east taking so long?
-Who is inside the holdout?
Hundreds of fighters are believed to be inside the pocket, which lies in the oil-rich province of Deir Ezzor near the Iraqi border.
The U.S.-led coalition has estimated some 2,000 fighters to be present in the holdout, which includes the towns of Hajin, Sousa and Al-Shaafa.
According to SDF commanders on the front line, a great number of those combatants are likely to be non-Syrians.
The SDF has said it believes "major leaders" of IS are hiding inside the pocket, where most front line commanders are Iraqis.
Nicholas Heras, an analyst at the Center for a New American Security, says "a mini army of several hundred fighters... has been assembled by IS there, including some of its best snipers."
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a Britain-based war monitor, says IS family members are also inside the embattled jihadist holdout.
-Why the tough IS fightback?
IS overran large parts of Syria and neighboring Iraq in 2014, declaring a "caliphate" across territories it controlled.
But various offensives in both countries have routed the jihadists from most of that land, crushing their dreams of statehood.
In Syria, the extremists saw their dominion shrink to an eastern pocket around Hajin, although they also have a presence in the country's vast Badia desert.
Last edited by MHz; 2 weeks ago at 06:24 PM..
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#313
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Russian hand signal for 'Whoa, we are 'first-aiders, do you need help?''. 2 moving boats might mean this was a smart-shell.

Random safety inspection by Kostgardski.
 
MHz
#314
'Stitches' one is real close to the start (0.08), seems appropriate considerin what is behind the glass.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9O8oLqY2sxo
 
Ocean Breeze
Free Thinker
-1
#315
Russia ‘rejects’ Trump plan to cancel Argentina meeting and will summon president to meet Putin

https://www.rawstory.com/2018/11/rus..._notifications
 
Ocean Breeze
Free Thinker
-1
#316
‘They used the exact same fake cover story’: MSNBC’s Ari Melber says Trump and Russia worked together

https://www.rawstory.com/2018/11/use..._notifications
 
Ocean Breeze
Free Thinker
-1
#317
Former CIA operative explains why Trump was ‘the perfect dupe’ for Putin — and why Russia had to make him win

https://www.rawstory.com/2018/11/for..._notifications
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#318
US Military Contractor Is Hiring Personnel To Support Classified ‘Contingency Operations’ In Ukraine


4624 Views December 02, 2018 19 Comments
A US contractor accidentally revealed a US military specialist deployment in the combat zones in Ukraine via an Job Advertisement on LinkedIn.
http://southfront.org/us-military-contractor-is-hiring-personnel-to-support-classified-contingency-operations-in-ukraine/
Similarly to the Atlantic Council’s report on independence of Eastern European countries, as well as the meeting between US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Ukrainian Foreign Minister Pavlo Klimkin, the posting comes days before the escalation in the Sea of Azov.
Mission Essential is a government contractor, which primarily serves intelligence and military clients. It began as the US government’s leading provider of translation and interpretation services.
Screenshot provided in case the advert times out or is “accidentally” taken down:
 
MHz
#319
Probably got all the prisoners from jail already that they will include when the prisoner exchange happens. Pete and another poster here are from the area, how can they resist the call to help the motherland?? Traitors by any any other name IMO.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#320
NATO toils to keep Russia out of Ukraine, in missile treaty

Quote:

BRUSSELS — Russia takes center-stage at NATO Tuesday as allied foreign ministers meet to debate ways to dissuade Moscow from destabilizing Ukraine and encourage it to respect a landmark Cold-war era nuclear treaty.
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and his NATO partners will hold talks with Ukrainian Foreign Minister Pavlo Klimkin as Kiev seeks international support for its Black Sea confrontation with Russia.
Russian border guards last week fired on three Ukrainian navy vessels in the Black Sea near the Russia-occupied Crimea. The vessels and the crews were captured.
But it is unclear what more NATO would do beyond the sea patrols and air policing it already does in the region.
Noting that Ukraine not a member of NATO, Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said the allies already "provide strong political support and strong practical support."

 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
-1
#321
Putin says Russia will be forced to respond if U.S. exits arms treaty

Quote:

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that Russia would be forced to respond if the United States exits the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces arms control treaty.
The United States delivered Russia a 60-day ultimatum on Tuesday to come clean about what Washington says is a violation of a 1987 nuclear arms control treaty, saying it would be forced to start a six-month process of withdrawal if nothing changed.
Putin, in televised comments, said that Moscow was against the scrapping of the treaty, but that the United States had long ago decided to exit the treaty and was blaming Russia for violations in order for them to serve as a pretext.
(Reporting by Vladimir Soldatkin; writing by Tom Balmforth; Editing by Toby Chopra)

 
Soldier
#322
I did think Russia isn't any allied to the US because Russia are whole gay.
 
Soldier
#323
Entire Russia is gay sex haha.
 
DaSleeper
+2
#324
Quote: Originally Posted by Soldier View Post

Entire Russia is gay sex haha.

Nothing beats a Camel for that eh?
 
Soldier
#325
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

Nothing beats a Camel for that eh?

So the US had the capacity to destroy Africa if it would be, there where nothing of this bullet.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#326
I though socialism wasn't linked to communism? I also thought the US were the only ones messing with South American countries? H'mmmmm

Kremlin scoffs at US criticism of bombers in Venezuela

Quote:

MOSCOW (AP) — The Kremlin has rejected U.S. criticism of Russian strategic bombers' deployment to Venezuela.
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo responded to Monday's arrival of a pair of Tu-160 nuclear-capable bombers in Venezuela by tweeting that "the Russian and Venezuelan people should see this for what it is: two corrupt governments squandering public funds, and squelching liberty and freedom while their people suffer."
Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, dismissed Pompeo's comment as "undiplomatic" and "inappropriate." He told reporters Tuesday that such criticism sounds odd from a country "half of whose military budget would be enough to feed the whole of Africa."
Russian-U.S. ties have sunk to post-Cold War lows over Ukraine, the war in Syria and allegations of Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election.

Why was Trump pulling out of the missile agreement with Russia?

Russia says its Su-57 stealth fighter will be armed with deadly hypersonic missiles that can defeat all US defenses

Quote:

Russia said its Su-57 stealth fighter jet will be armed with hypersonic missiles similar to the Kinzhal hypersonic missile.
Moscow said the new Kh-47M2, or Kinzhal, hypersonic missile can hit speeds of up to Mach 10 and has a range of 1,200 miles.
But the missile will have to be a smaller version of the Kinzhal to fit in the Su-57's weapons bays.
Russia's Su-57 stealth fighter jet will be armed with hypersonic missiles, according to Tass, a Russian state-owned media outlet.
"In accordance with Russia's State Armament Program for 2018-2027, Su-57 jet fighters will be equipped with hypersonic missiles," a Russian defense industry source told Tass.
"The jet fighters will receive missiles with characteristics similar to that of the Kinzhal missiles, but with inter-body placement and smaller size," the source added.
Moscow said the new Kh-47M2, or Kinzhal, air-launched hypersonic missile can hit speeds of up to Mach 10 and has a range of 1,200 miles. The Tass report also said "Kinzhal missiles are practically impossible to detect with modern air defense systems."
While many western analysts remain skeptical of the Kinzhal's capabilities, the missile appears to be an adaptation of the Iskander-M short-range ballistic missile that flies at hypersonic speeds.
In March, Russia successfully test fired a Kinzhal from a MiG-31BM and is fitting it to a MiG-31K variant.
But the "missiles with characteristics similar to that of the Kinzhal" will have to be smaller than the actual Kinzhal to fit in the Su-57's weapons bays, according to The Diplomat.
The Russian military will reportedly receive a small batch of 12 Su-57s next year, but Moscow has yet to equip the fighter with theIzdeliye-30 engine, which means it is not yet a true fifth-generation jet.