Pedestrians mowed down in North York


Hoid
#301
Quote: Originally Posted by OpposingDigit View Post

The Pentagon Is Making a Ray Gun to Stop Truck Attacks
By Patrick Tucker
April 24, 2018
https://www.defenseone.com/technolog...attacks/147702

A device that resembles an old phonograph may soon be used to jam and shut down vehicles like the one that killed 10 people in Toronto.

The van driver who killed 10 Toronto pedestrians on Monday showed that a terror technique that ISIS pioneered in Iraq and Syria in 2015 remains terrifyingly effective against unsuspecting urban populations. But the U.S. military is working on a new weapon to stop vehicle-born terrorist threats, one that could help police departments as well.

The Defense Department’s Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Program , or JNLWD, is pushing ahead with a new direct energy weapon that uses high-powered microwaves to stop cars in their tracks without damaging the vehicle, its driver, or anyone else.

The jammer works by targeting the car’s engine control unit causing it to reboot over and over, stalling the engine. Like an invisible hand, the microwaves hold the car in place. “Anything that has electronics on it, these high-powered microwaves will affect,” David Law, who leads JNLWD’s technology division, said in March. “As long as the [radio] is on, it holds the vehicle stopped.”

Can't wait until the terrorists get their hands on that thing.
 
justlooking
+1
#302
Quote: Originally Posted by OpposingDigit View Post

The Pentagon Is Making a Ray Gun to Stop Truck Attacks
By Patrick Tucker
April 24, 2018
https://www.defenseone.com/technolog...attacks/147702

A device that resembles an old phonograph may soon be used to jam and shut down vehicles like the one that killed 10 people in Toronto.

The van driver who killed 10 Toronto pedestrians on Monday showed that a terror technique that ISIS pioneered in Iraq and Syria in 2015 remains terrifyingly effective against unsuspecting urban populations. But the U.S. military is working on a new weapon to stop vehicle-born terrorist threats, one that could help police departments as well.

The Defense Department’s Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Program , or JNLWD, is pushing ahead with a new direct energy weapon that uses high-powered microwaves to stop cars in their tracks without damaging the vehicle, its driver, or anyone else.

The jammer works by targeting the car’s engine control unit causing it to reboot over and over, stalling the engine. Like an invisible hand, the microwaves hold the car in place. “Anything that has electronics on it, these high-powered microwaves will affect,” David Law, who leads JNLWD’s technology division, said in March. “As long as the [radio] is on, it holds the vehicle stopped.”


Nice idea, but most trucks of peace are done long before the police show up.
Might work better on the daily high speed chases in LA though.
 
Curious Cdn
#303
Quote: Originally Posted by OpposingDigit View Post

The Pentagon Is Making a Ray Gun to Stop Truck Attacks
By Patrick Tucker
April 24, 2018
https://www.defenseone.com/technolog...attacks/147702

A device that resembles an old phonograph may soon be used to jam and shut down vehicles like the one that killed 10 people in Toronto.

The van driver who killed 10 Toronto pedestrians on Monday showed that a terror technique that ISIS pioneered in Iraq and Syria in 2015 remains terrifyingly effective against unsuspecting urban populations. But the U.S. military is working on a new weapon to stop vehicle-born terrorist threats, one that could help police departments as well.

The Defense Department’s Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Program , or JNLWD, is pushing ahead with a new direct energy weapon that uses high-powered microwaves to stop cars in their tracks without damaging the vehicle, its driver, or anyone else.

The jammer works by targeting the car’s engine control unit causing it to reboot over and over, stalling the engine. Like an invisible hand, the microwaves hold the car in place. “Anything that has electronics on it, these high-powered microwaves will affect,” David Law, who leads JNLWD’s technology division, said in March. “As long as the [radio] is on, it holds the vehicle stopped.”

Now you'll have jammed up, out-of-control trucks roaring into anything at random after you've zapped then with your ray gun. You might disable the engine. You might even lock up the steering (!) but I doubt very much that you will be able to remotely apply the brakes.
 
spaminator
#304
Funeral to be held today for Toronto van attack victim Anne Marie D’Amico | Toronto Sun
 
taxslave
#305
Quote: Originally Posted by OpposingDigit View Post

The Pentagon Is Making a Ray Gun to Stop Truck Attacks
By Patrick Tucker
April 24, 2018
https://www.defenseone.com/technolog...attacks/147702

A device that resembles an old phonograph may soon be used to jam and shut down vehicles like the one that killed 10 people in Toronto.

The van driver who killed 10 Toronto pedestrians on Monday showed that a terror technique that ISIS pioneered in Iraq and Syria in 2015 remains terrifyingly effective against unsuspecting urban populations. But the U.S. military is working on a new weapon to stop vehicle-born terrorist threats, one that could help police departments as well.

The Defense Department’s Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Program , or JNLWD, is pushing ahead with a new direct energy weapon that uses high-powered microwaves to stop cars in their tracks without damaging the vehicle, its driver, or anyone else.

The jammer works by targeting the car’s engine control unit causing it to reboot over and over, stalling the engine. Like an invisible hand, the microwaves hold the car in place. “Anything that has electronics on it, these high-powered microwaves will affect,” David Law, who leads JNLWD’s technology division, said in March. “As long as the [radio] is on, it holds the vehicle stopped.”

Portable EMP device. To be effective there would have to be one on each street corner with a soljur to use it. They will have to do a lot of refining or it will crash every computer in the area.

Maybe they will make one small enough so everyone can have one in their pocket instead of a Glock.
 
Danbones
+1
#306
That will screw up the electronic ID chip thingies they want to install in the guns ( and butter knives). Which is what they are really after.

I say bankrupt the billion dollar making antipsychotic drugs INDUSTRY that is making these people psychotic. Oh wait, the teachers, and the cops, and the beaurocraps, and the doctors all have their pensions invested there, so we can't do that!!!
 
taxslave
#307
DO teachers get a commission on the lala pills they force the brighter students to take?
 
JLM
#308
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Infamous might be a better term!

Basically I believe there is nothing you can do to stop this shit- the only suggestion I can make is to be more vigilant than the next person and hopefully it will happen to him instead of you! It comes under the heading, "SHIT HAPPENS".

I think there are two things people could do that would reduce death and injury by about 80% - take the ear plugs out of your ears and put the cell phones away while walking! Not rocket science!
 
spaminator
#309
'HOLD ON TO THE KINDNESS': Toronto van attack victim Anne Marie D'Amico remembered at funeral
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
May 2, 2018
Updated:
May 2, 2018 4:32 PM EDT
Rocco and Carmela D'Amico follow the casket of their daughter Anne Marie following her funeral service in Toronto on Wednesday, May 2, 2018. D'Amico was one of the ten victims of last Monday's van attack. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
TORONTO — The family of a 30-year-old woman who was among those killed in last week’s van attack in Toronto says she would have wanted people to care for one another in the aftermath of the tragedy.
In a statement read by a friend outside Anne Marie D’Amico’s funeral on Wednesday, her family said she was a warm person with a big heart.
“Like springtime, Anne Marie also had a lightness about her. A warmth and a way of being that we miss beyond words and feel deep in our hearts,” said the family’s statement, read by friend John Simonetti.
“We believe it is our obligation to all those affected by this tragedy, especially to those who died, to be better to one another … that is what Anne Marie would have wanted.”
D’Amico was among 10 people killed last week when a rental van climbed a sidewalk in a north Toronto neighbourhood and ran into pedestrians in its path.
She worked at Invesco Canada, a U.S.-based investment firm with offices near the scene of the attack, and has been described as a cheerful, friendly person and a dedicated volunteer.
“We cannot bring back Anne Marie, nor the others that have passed. What we can do, however, is hold on to the kindness, acceptance and the unwavering collective good of our great city,” her family said.
Family members walk past a picture of Anne Marie D’Amico as they arrive for her funeral in Toronto on Wednesday May 2, 2018. D’Amico was one of the ten victims of last Monday’s van attack. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
D’Amico’s family also said they were praying for the loved ones of the others who died last week, as well as for the family of the man charged in the incident.
Mourners packed the pews of a Toronto church where D’Amico’s funeral was held.
Funerals have already been held for Dorothy Sewell, 80, Geraldine Brady, 83, and 85-year-old Munir Najjar.
Alek Minassian, 25, of Richmond Hill, has been charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder and 13 of attempted murder related to those injured in the attack. Police say they expect to lay another three attempted murder charges against him.
Anne Marie D’Amico’s casket is followed by family members after her funeral service in Toronto on Wednesday, May 2, 2018. D’Amico was one of the ten victims of last Monday’s van attack. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
‘HOLD ON TO THE KINDNESS’: Toronto van attack victim Anne Marie D’Amico remembered at funeral | Toronto Sun

Van attack victim Anne Marie D’Amico had a big heart, family says
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
May 2, 2018
Updated:
May 2, 2018 8:52 PM EDT
Anne Marie D'Amico is shown in this undated photo taken from a Facebook tribute page, "Remembering Anne Marie D'Amico." (CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Facebook)
TORONTO — A 30-year-old woman who was among those killed in last week’s van attack in Toronto was remembered Wednesday as someone who was humble about her achievements and always worked to help others.
Anne Marie D’Amico, who was the first of the 10 attack victims to be publicly identified, was laid to rest following a funeral service at the church she attended with her family.
Her brother delivered an emotional eulogy ahead of a Catholic mass at which mourners packed the pews.
“She brought so much warmth and comfort to others,” Nick D’Amico said of his younger sister. “She would go the extra mile showing she cared. She continually did things that had enormous impact because she did everything with her whole heart.”
Family members follow the casket as they arrive at the funeral for Anne Marie D’Amico in Toronto on Wednesday, May 2, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)
For instance, he said, after a plate that his mother loved broke, his sister used a broken shard as a guide to hand paint the exact same design onto a new plate to give to her mother as a gift.
His sister also spent much of her vacation time volunteering, doing whatever she could to make others’ lives better, he said.
He also remembered his younger sister as a one-time pool player who played on a team with bravado, and described her winning a game with a particularly impressive shot — sinking two balls at once.
“The most inspiring thing was that Anne Marie never bragged or even talked about that shot,” he said. “When the cards were stacked against her, she turned to her fighting spirit. And when the time was right, she rose to the occasion with patience, courage and talent. She was always able to pull off something amazing.”
Hundreds of people — those who knew D’Amico and those who did not — filled the church and spilled into an overflow area to commemorate the young woman, who worked at Invesco Canada, a U.S.-based investment firm with offices near the scene of the attack.
Some wore two ribbons pinned to their chests — a white one, for victims of violence against women, and a blue one emblazoned with the hashtag “TorontoStrong.”
Before the service began, D’Amico’s family issued a call for others to care for each other in the wake of last week’s tragedy, saying it was what she would have wanted.
“Like springtime, Anne Marie also had a lightness about her, a warmth and a way of being that we miss beyond words and feel deep in our hearts,” said the family’s statement, read out by friend John Simonetti ahead of the funeral.
“We believe it is our obligation to all those affected by this tragedy, especially to those who died, to be better to one another … that is what Anne Marie would have wanted.”
D’Amico’s family also said they were praying for the loved ones of the others who died last week, as well as for the family of the man charged in the incident.
“We cannot bring back Anne Marie, nor the others that have passed. What we can do, however, is hold on to the kindness, acceptance and the unwavering collective good of our great city,” her family said.
“Anne Marie had a big heart. We have faith that Toronto does, too, and we hope that going forward, as broken hearts heal, we will have conversations. Conversations about how we will collectively learn from this tragedy.”
Funerals have already been held for Dorothy Sewell, 80, Geraldine Brady, 83, and 85-year-old Munir Najjar.
Alek Minassian, 25, of Richmond Hill, Ont., has been charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder and 13 of attempted murder related to those injured in the attack. Police say they expect to lay another three attempted murder charges against him.

Van attack victim Anne Marie D
Last edited by spaminator; May 3rd, 2018 at 04:28 AM..
 
spaminator
#310
Coroner addresses Humboldt Broncos crash victims mix-up
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
May 18, 2018
Updated:
May 18, 2018 10:20 AM EDT
Xavier Labelle (left), an 18-year-old from Saskatoon, was initially identified as one of the fatalities in the April 6, 2018 Humboldt Broncos bus crash. Labelle is alive. Parker Tobin, an 18-year-old from Stony Plain, Alberta, has been identified as one of those who died in the crash.
A coroner involved in the Humboldt Broncos bus crash says it wasn’t until an injured player woke up in hospital and said he wasn’t who everyone thought he was that officials realized there had been a big mistake in identifying the dead.
Since the crash, Parker Tobin’s loved ones from Alberta had been at the bedside of the player they thought was Parker, an 18-year-old goalie. He had serious facial injuries, but they believed he was their boy.
It turned out it was actually teammate Xavier Labelle in the bed, a player already listed as among the many dead and being remembered at a public vigil that night.
“Xavier woke up and said, ‘I’m not Parker Tobin,”‘ Wayne Nogier, a community coroner in Melfort, Sask., recalled this week.
It was a mix-up that compounded an already unthinkable tragedy.
Nogier, a former paramedic who also sits on the board of the Saskatchewan Hockey Association and has worked as a referee, was the first of two coroners to arrive at the crash site north of Tisdale, Sask., on April 6. He is listed as the coroner on the case file.
The junior hockey team had been on its way to a Friday night playoff game when its bus and a truck collided at a rural intersection.
Fourteen bodies from the wreckage were taken to a Saskatoon funeral home that acted as the morgue over that weekend, said Nogier. Fifteen injured people were taken to hospital and two died in the days that followed.
Photos and information from the team, including the players’ heights and weights, were initially used by staff from the coroner’s office and funeral home to match the bodies with names, said Nogier.
It was a difficult task.
The players had all dyed their hair blond and were growing playoff beards. Most didn’t have their wallets on them.
Members of the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team are shown in a photo posted to the team’s Twitter feed. Humboldt Broncos via THE CANADIAN PRESS
An assistant coach helped identify the bodies before the families were brought in, said Nogier. All were able to confirm the matches, except in Labelle’s case.
“The family looked and they’re saying, ‘Oh geez. You know. Maybe. Probably. Umm, I don’t know. Nobody else is unaccounted for. Maybe.”‘
Nogier said Labelle, an 18-year-old defenceman from Saskatoon, had previously worn braces, so a request was made for his dental records. His orthodontist was planning to head to his office that Sunday night to pull Labelle’s films.
But before he could send them to the coroner’s office, the player who was actually Labelle woke up.
By then, his name was listed among the dead on a news release that had been sent out Sunday afternoon from the coroner’s office and the RCMP. His name was also read aloud at the vigil in Humboldt.
Nogier said he doesn’t know who made the decision to release the name — only that he didn’t sign off on it.
When the mix-up was discovered, the Labelle and Tobin families switched places. Nogier said Tobin’s family was asked for an identification and was certain it was the 18-year-old goalie.
They were understanding about the mistake, he said.
“They’re devastated and beyond words as to what’s occurring, yet happy for the Labelle family that things have turned out in their case,” Nogier said.
“These teams are very close and these kids are all families to all of these parents.”
Labelle’s family released a photo earlier this month of him at physiotherapy and said they hold no ill will about the error.
Grant Bastedo, a representative of the Broncos and some of the players’ families, including the Labelles, said people did their best during an incredibly sad time.
“It was a mistake that was made. Don’t know who made it — it doesn’t matter. It’s water under the bridge,” he said.
Drew Wilby, a spokesman with Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Justice, which oversees the coroner’s office, apologized at the time the mistake was made public. He said the coroner’s office was doing an internal review of what happened to see if improvements could be made.
RCMP did not respond to a request for comment.
Saskatoon’s former police chief, Clive Weighill, had been tasked before the crash with reviewing the coroner’s system in Saskatchewan. He told The Canadian Press in an email that while he isn’t examining specific cases, Humboldt will be considered as part of his overall findings.
His review is to be done by July.
Nogier said he knew many of the Broncos and their families and hopes the misidentification will provide an opportunity to further examine the coroner’s system.
He said he doesn’t believe changes, such as switching to a medical examiner who relies on forensic pathologists, would have made a difference in the Broncos case.
And, despite the error, the families were well served by first responders, police and coroner’s staff, Nogier said.
People may wonder how such a mistake could happen, he said, but it’s easy considering there were numerous casualties and many hurdles.
“If there’s an opportunity to be better, we should jump all over that, ” Nogier said.
“If there isn’t, we should be comfortable in the fact that everything that was done did get done and was done appropriately.”
Humboldt Broncos move forward with allocating $15M in donations
Broncos to return to the ice for 2018-19 Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League season
‘Did we win our game?’ Injured player can’t recall crash
Coroner addresses Humboldt Broncos crash victims mix-up | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#311
'It hasn't really hit me': Toronto van attack survivor who lost both legs
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
July 9, 2018
Updated:
July 9, 2018 9:56 AM EDT
TORONTO — Beverly Smith has only hazy memories of the van attack that killed 10 people and left her broken and bleeding on a north Toronto sidewalk months ago.
But the 81-year-old Toronto woman grapples with the legacy of the April attack every day, as she adapts to life in a wheelchair and works to regain the independence she enjoyed before the devastating incident.
Smith, a retired teacher and librarian, awoke from emergency surgery to learn doctors had amputated both legs in order to save her life. She was also told she had suffered some brain damage, which her family believes may be to blame for her vague recollections.
“It hasn’t really hit me, only certain things,” she told The Canadian Press in a recent interview at the Toronto hospital where she continues to recover. “Like if I see somebody dancing or jumping, I think, I can’t do that anymore.”
Police are seen near a damaged van in Toronto after a van mounted a sidewalk crashing into a number of pedestrians on April 23, 2018. Aaron Vincent Elkaim / THE CANADIAN PRESS
The grandmother of five has also been experiencing phantom pains, which she described as feeling like she is wearing too-tight shoes and socks. “I keep thinking they’re there, but they’re not. There’s nothing there,” she said.
Fifteen others were wounded in the brazen daytime attack that made international headlines and left Toronto reeling with grief, with some predicting the city would be forever changed.
A 25-year-old man, Alek Minassian, was charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder and 16 counts of attempted murder. His case remains before the courts, with the next date set for September.
Alek Minassian, 25, of Richmond Hill, is charged in the deadly van massacre on Yonge St. in Toronto on Monday, April 23, 2018. LinkedIn
The site of the crash was transformed into a monument to public mourning as shocked residents left flowers and cards that were later cleared away in anticipation of a permanent memorial.
A fund in support of the victims has so far raised $3.4 million, and will continue to collect donations until the end of August. The money is set to be disbursed over the following month.
Ozra Kenari, right, cries after placing flowers at a memorial for the victims along Yonge Street the day after a driver drove a rented van down sidewalks Monday afternoon, striking pedestrians in his path, in Toronto, Tuesday, April 24, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Smith’s family has also set up an online fundraiser to help cover the costs of her care and of making their homes wheelchair-accessible ahead of her return, which is scheduled for September.
And while there has been an outpouring of support from friends and strangers alike, Smith’s family worry her story will be forgotten as the city begins to move on.
Though Smith recalls very little about the incident — she has foggy memories of a phone booth, though there was none at the site — her children said every detail of that day is seared in their minds.
They learned Smith was walking from her condo to the North York Central Library to return books and pick up a copy of “The Handmaid’s Tale” when she was struck while crossing the street.
At the time, her son, Michael Smith, 44, was at home on his patio having a beer while a friend fixed his sink. Her daughter, Ally Copsey, was teaching at a high school in Newmarket.
When Michael Smith saw news of the attack on his phone, he didn’t think much of it, but turned on the TV to get more details, he said.
“The first images I saw were people being interviewed in front of my mom’s condo,” he said. “I was instantly worried.”
Calls and emails to his mother went unanswered, he said. Then police arrived at his home around 5:30 p.m. “I came down the stairs, bawling. I just assumed she was dead,” he said.
The officers told Michael Smith his mother had just come out of surgery and took him to Sunnybrook Hospital, where he had to confirm her identity because her wallet went missing in the attack, he said.
With no knowledge of the extent of his mother’s injuries, Michael Smith walked into the room where she and other victims were being treated. She was unrecognizable, he said. “I just screamed a lot,” he recalled. “It was great to see that she was alive, but so many injuries.”
It took weeks for Beverly Smith to be alert again, her son said. After they removed her breathing tube, she was finally able to speak. “She didn’t recognize us…but we’re glad that we were able to communicate with her and hear her talk again,” her son said.
Still, it’s hard to see Smith ask for help, her daughter said. “She was so independent before,” Copsey said.
Beverly Smith, a survivor of the Yonge Street van attack, poses for a photo with her daughter Ally Smith and son Michael Smith on the rooftop patio of Bridgepoint Health in Toronto on Friday, July 6, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin
Smith’s younger grandchildren have also asked when her legs will grow back and when she will be out of the wheelchair, the family said.
Asked whether the family is angry about the attack or at the accused, Michael Smith said they haven’t dwelled on that aspect. Everyone is still in shock, he said.
“I’ve cried three or four times a day…it’s been exhausting. It takes a toll on us,” he said. “I don’t think I’ll ever get over this.”
For all the challenges she faces, Smith said the impact on her children is what truly upsets her. “They have all the uncertainty,” she said.
[youtube]cdc1ntaTgKY[/youtube]
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...lost-both-legs
 
spaminator
#312
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...sence-downtown
 
spaminator
#313
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...lert-last-week
 
spaminator
#314
MANDEL: Any answers to massacre on Yonge St. still a year away
Michele Mandel
Published:
November 1, 2018
Updated:
November 1, 2018 6:28 PM EDT
Alek Minassian, 25, of Richmond Hill, is charged in the deadly van massacre on Yonge St. in Toronto on Monday, April 23, 2018.LinkedIn
Alek Minassian did not appear in court. Not by video. Not in person.
The accused killer continues to remain the enigma he has been since he was first charged six months ago with Toronto’s worst mass murder.
The lawyer for the alleged van attacker was in the windowless Finch Ave. courtroom on his behalf Thursday to hear the Crown announce what had already been widely expected — there will be no preliminary hearing for Minassian. The deputy attorney general has signed a direct indictment sending the case straight to Superior Court.
Without a prelim, Minassian’s trial on 10 counts of first-degree murder and 16 of attempted murder will now happen sooner — but not as soon as anyone might wish. Defence lawyer Boris Bytensky told reporters that his best guess is that it’s still about a year to a year and a half away.
So we’ll still have to wait that long before getting any answers to what happened on that horrible April day.
Toronto Police are seen near a damaged van in Toronto after a rental van hit pedestrians along Yonge St. on April 23, 2018. (CP) THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim
It was the worst terror attack this city had ever seen — strangers out enjoying the rare spring sunshine along Yonge St. mowed down by a white rented van with a driver intent on maximum carnage. It was a massacre of innocents using one of the favourite methods of Islamist extremists in France and Germany — yet all these months later, the motivation remains unclear.
Mining Minassian’s social media fingerprints revealed an awkward computer whiz and failed infantry recruit, the kind of odd, enraged loner we’re so used to hearing about after yet another American mass shooting.
But for the first time for many of us, we also heard about the “incel” — or involuntary celibate — community that blames women for their sexual failings.
The 25-year-old Richmond Hill man appeared obsessed with misogynistic incel hero Elliot Rodger, who killed six people in Isla Vista, Calif. in 2014 before killing himself. On the morning of the van attack, Minassian had posted on Facebook: “The Incel Rebellion has already begun! We will overthrow all the Chads and Stacys! All hail the Supreme Gentleman Elliot Rodger!”
This image from video posted on YouTube shows Elliot Rodger. Sheriff’s officials say Rodger was the gunman who went on a shooting rampage near the University of California at Santa Barbara on May 23, 2014. (AP Photo/YouTube)
Stacys are the women who reject them and Chads are their rivals with the active sex lives they covet.
When the van finally came to a stop seven minutes after ploughing through pedestrians from Finch to Sheppard, sending their bodies flying into the air, all but two of the 10 dead were women.
Lawyer and former mayoral candidate Saron Gebresellassi was in court, as she has been for each Minassian hearing to speak on behalf of the victims.
“I’d like to remind people that this attack,” she said, “was motivated by misogyny. It was an attack of terror … this was clearly a politically driven act of terror.”
We don’t know that for certain, of course. All we do know for sure is that it would not be the last terror attack on our streets this year.
We had once felt immune. And then, just three months later, the Danforth became the site of more bloodshed. On the night of July 22, Faisal Hussain went on a shooting rampage, killing Julianna Kozis, 10, and Reese Fallon, 18, and wounding 13 others before turning the gun on himself.
Another troubled loner whose motivation was hard to discern. But he is dead and we might never understand.
As for Minassian, there are answers we can still demand. For now, though, we don’t know how he will plead or what his defence will be. His trial may not even take place here at all — his lawyer is contemplating a change of venue application over concerns that he might not be able to get a fair trial in Toronto.
Six months on, we are still hurting. Still angry. And still mystified as to why anyone would want to terrorize strangers just going about their day.
mmandel@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...ected-in-court
 
spaminator
#315
Trial date set for accused in Toronto van attack that killed 10
Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
Published:
December 4, 2018
Updated:
December 4, 2018 8:43 PM EST
Alek Minassian, 25, of Richmond Hill, is charged in the deadly van massacre on Yonge St. in Toronto on Monday, April 23, 2018.LinkedIn
The Richmond Hill man accused of killing 10 people in a van attack in north Toronto will go on trial on Feb. 3, 2020.
Alek Minassian, 26, didn’t appear in court Tuesday but his lawyer Boris Bytensky and North York Crown attorney Joe Callaghan set his trial date during the case’s first time in Superior Court.
Lawyers estimated the trial would last three to four months, but that time frame could be shortened in the intervening time frame.
MANDEL: Answers no closer in massacre on Yonge St.
Family of accused van attack driver stands by him: lawyer
‘HOLD ON TO THE KINDNESS’: Van attack victim remembered
Minassian faces 10 counts of first-degree murder and 16 counts of attempted murder in the April 23 Yonge Street attack.
Bytensky said Minassian probably won’t appear again in court as a designation has been filed. A designation enables an accused’s counsel to appear on his behalf.
“Minassian won’t show up unless he has to be here, for example, he’d certainly have to be here for a guilty plea or a trial,” Bytensky said.
“It’s really very soon for a trial. Normally, we’d be picking preliminary hearing dates instead of a trial date at this point,” Bytensky told reporters.
Police allege Minassian drove a rental van down a busy sidewalk along Yonge south of Finch Avenue, mowing down pedestrians along the way.
Last month, court heard the deputy attorney general granted the prosecution’s request to skip the preliminary hearing in the case and head straight to trial.
Justice John McMahon suggested a September 2019 tentative trial date, but Bytensky said he would rather “pick a realistic trial date,” given the complexity of the case and the fact the defence is still receiving disclosure.
Bytensky said he has already received a substantial volume of disclosure, which is the accumulated evidence including interviews and surveillance videos, that investigators have compiled.
The lawyers will be back in court on Jan. 31, 2019.
spazzano@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...k-due-in-court
 
Curious Cdn
#316
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

Trial date set for accused in Toronto van attack that killed 10
Sam Pazzano Courts Bureau
Published:
December 4, 2018
Updated:
December 4, 2018 8:43 PM EST
Alek Minassian, 25, of Richmond Hill, is charged in the deadly van massacre on Yonge St. in Toronto on Monday, April 23, 2018.LinkedIn
The Richmond Hill man accused of killing 10 people in a van attack in north Toronto will go on trial on Feb. 3, 2020.
Alek Minassian, 26, didn’t appear in court Tuesday but his lawyer Boris Bytensky and North York Crown attorney Joe Callaghan set his trial date during the case’s first time in Superior Court.
Lawyers estimated the trial would last three to four months, but that time frame could be shortened in the intervening time frame.
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Minassian faces 10 counts of first-degree murder and 16 counts of attempted murder in the April 23 Yonge Street attack.
Bytensky said Minassian probably won’t appear again in court as a designation has been filed. A designation enables an accused’s counsel to appear on his behalf.
“Minassian won’t show up unless he has to be here, for example, he’d certainly have to be here for a guilty plea or a trial,” Bytensky said.
“It’s really very soon for a trial. Normally, we’d be picking preliminary hearing dates instead of a trial date at this point,” Bytensky told reporters.
Police allege Minassian drove a rental van down a busy sidewalk along Yonge south of Finch Avenue, mowing down pedestrians along the way.
Last month, court heard the deputy attorney general granted the prosecution’s request to skip the preliminary hearing in the case and head straight to trial.
Justice John McMahon suggested a September 2019 tentative trial date, but Bytensky said he would rather “pick a realistic trial date,” given the complexity of the case and the fact the defence is still receiving disclosure.
Bytensky said he has already received a substantial volume of disclosure, which is the accumulated evidence including interviews and surveillance videos, that investigators have compiled.
The lawyers will be back in court on Jan. 31, 2019.
spazzano@postmedia.com
http://torontosun.com/news/local-new...k-due-in-court

If this were a proper and developed country, he would have used a gun instead of a vehicle.

We've got a lot of catching up to do, eh Bondo?
 

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