EU leaders agree UK's Brexit deal at Brussels summit


Blackleaf
#1
The UKs withdrawal agreement from the European Union has been approved by EU leaders, its chief official Donald Tusk has announced.

The 27 leaders gave it their backing after less than an hour's discussion in Brussels.

Mr Tusk signalled on Saturday that the deal would be approved after Spain withdrew last-minute concerns over Gibraltar.

EU leaders agree UK's Brexit deal at Brussels summit


BBC News
25 November 2018


Prime Minister Theresa May arrives in Brussels with Britain's Permanent Representative to the EU Tim Barrow (left)

The UKs withdrawal agreement from the European Union has been approved by EU leaders, its chief official Donald Tusk has announced.

The 27 leaders gave it their backing after less than an hour's discussion in Brussels.

Mr Tusk signalled on Saturday that the deal would be approved after Spain withdrew last-minute concerns over Gibraltar.

The deal needs to be approved by the UK Parliament, with many MPs opposed.

Mr Tusk, the president of the European Council, broke the news on Twitter.

Donald Tusk ✔
@eucopresident


EU27 has endorsed the Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration on the future EU-UK relations.

1,272 Likes 9:33 AM - Nov 25, 2018

It follows more than 18 months of negotiations between the two sides, which began when the UK triggered Article 50 in the wake of the 2016 referendum leave vote.

The UK is scheduled to leave the EU on 29 March 2019.

The UK Parliament is expected to vote on the deal in early December but its approval is by no means guaranteed, with Labour, the Lib Dems, the SNP, the DUP and many Conservatives MPs set to vote against.

Prime Minister Theresa May has appealed to the public to get behind the agreement, arguing it is the best deal she could have struck - and honours the result of the Brexit referendum.

It is 124 days until the UK leaves the EU at 11pm UK time on Friday 29th March 2019

What has the EU decided?

The EU leaders have approved the two key Brexit documents:

The EU withdrawal agreement: a 585-page, legally binding document setting out the terms of the UK's exit from the EU. It covers the UK's 39bn "divorce bill", citizens' rights and the Northern Ireland "backstop" - a way to keep the Irish border open, if trade talks stall


The political declaration, which sets out what the UK and EU's relationship may be like after Brexit - outlining how things like UK-EU trade and security will work

There was no formal vote on Sunday, with the EU proceeding by consensus.

In a one-page document confirming its decision, the European Council said the deal would pave the way for the UK's "orderly withdrawal" and it wanted the "closest possible" relationship in the future.

Before the meeting, European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker said the UK's departure was a "tragedy" for the EU, adding that there are "no smooth divorces".

" While the rest of the EU wanted it settled as soon as possible, Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaite said there were a number of possible outcomes if the UK Parliament rejected the deal, including an extension of the negotiations or another referendum.

The BBC's political editor Laura Kuenssberg said European leaders were making clear that while they were not happy about the UK's exit, this was the best and only deal on offer.

The next summit of European leaders, she pointed out, is currently scheduled the day after the crunch parliamentary vote is due to take place.

What happens next?

Mrs May will now need to persuade MPs in the UK Parliament to back it.

She is expected to spend the next fortnight travelling the UK trying to sell the deal before a parliamentary vote in the second week of December.

If MPs reject the deal, a number of things could happen - including leaving with no deal, an attempt to renegotiate or a general election.

Our political editor said while it looked tough for Mrs May to get MPs to agree, a lot could change in two weeks and it was "too early to tell" whether she could persuade the nation that it was in the national interest.

According to the Sunday Times, Chancellor Philip Hammond is working with other Cabinet ministers to try to persuade Mrs May to opt for a softer Brexit deal, which they believe could get through Parliament if her original deal is rejected.

And the Sunday Telegraph reported several senior ministers are working on a plan B - for a Norway-style relationship with the EU.

The agreement will also have to go back to the European Council, where a majority of countries (20 out of 27 states) will need to vote for it.

It will also need to be ratified by the European Parliament, in a vote expected to take place in early 2019.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-46334649
 
Bone357
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The UK’s withdrawal agreement from the European Union has been approved by EU leaders, its chief official Donald Tusk has announced.
The 27 leaders gave it their backing after less than an hour's discussion in Brussels.
Mr Tusk signalled on Saturday that the deal would be approved after Spain withdrew last-minute concerns over Gibraltar.
EU leaders agree UK's Brexit deal at Brussels summit

BBC News
25 November 2018

Prime Minister Theresa May arrives in Brussels with Britain's Permanent Representative to the EU Tim Barrow (left)
The UK’s withdrawal agreement from the European Union has been approved by EU leaders, its chief official Donald Tusk has announced.
The 27 leaders gave it their backing after less than an hour's discussion in Brussels.
Mr Tusk signalled on Saturday that the deal would be approved after Spain withdrew last-minute concerns over Gibraltar.
The deal needs to be approved by the UK Parliament, with many MPs opposed.
Mr Tusk, the president of the European Council, broke the news on Twitter.
Donald Tusk ✔
@eucopresident

EU27 has endorsed the Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration on the future EU-UK relations.
1,272 Likes 9:33 AM - Nov 25, 2018

It follows more than 18 months of negotiations between the two sides, which began when the UK triggered Article 50 in the wake of the 2016 referendum leave vote.
The UK is scheduled to leave the EU on 29 March 2019.
The UK Parliament is expected to vote on the deal in early December but its approval is by no means guaranteed, with Labour, the Lib Dems, the SNP, the DUP and many Conservatives MPs set to vote against.
Prime Minister Theresa May has appealed to the public to get behind the agreement, arguing it is the best deal she could have struck - and honours the result of the Brexit referendum.
It is 124 days until the UK leaves the EU at 11pm UK time on Friday 29th March 2019
What has the EU decided?
The EU leaders have approved the two key Brexit documents:
The EU withdrawal agreement: a 585-page, legally binding document setting out the terms of the UK's exit from the EU. It covers the UK's 39bn "divorce bill", citizens' rights and the Northern Ireland "backstop" - a way to keep the Irish border open, if trade talks stall

The political declaration, which sets out what the UK and EU's relationship may be like after Brexit - outlining how things like UK-EU trade and security will work
There was no formal vote on Sunday, with the EU proceeding by consensus.
In a one-page document confirming its decision, the European Council said the deal would pave the way for the UK's "orderly withdrawal" and it wanted the "closest possible" relationship in the future.
Before the meeting, European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker said the UK's departure was a "tragedy" for the EU, adding that there are "no smooth divorces".
" While the rest of the EU wanted it settled as soon as possible, Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaite said there were a number of possible outcomes if the UK Parliament rejected the deal, including an extension of the negotiations or another referendum.
The BBC's political editor Laura Kuenssberg said European leaders were making clear that while they were not happy about the UK's exit, this was the best and only deal on offer.
The next summit of European leaders, she pointed out, is currently scheduled the day after the crunch parliamentary vote is due to take place.
What happens next?
Mrs May will now need to persuade MPs in the UK Parliament to back it.
She is expected to spend the next fortnight travelling the UK trying to sell the deal before a parliamentary vote in the second week of December.
If MPs reject the deal, a number of things could happen - including leaving with no deal, an attempt to renegotiate or a general election.
Our political editor said while it looked tough for Mrs May to get MPs to agree, a lot could change in two weeks and it was "too early to tell" whether she could persuade the nation that it was in the national interest.
According to the Sunday Times, Chancellor Philip Hammond is working with other Cabinet ministers to try to persuade Mrs May to opt for a softer Brexit deal, which they believe could get through Parliament if her original deal is rejected.
And the Sunday Telegraph reported several senior ministers are working on a plan B - for a Norway-style relationship with the EU.
The agreement will also have to go back to the European Council, where a majority of countries (20 out of 27 states) will need to vote for it.
It will also need to be ratified by the European Parliament, in a vote expected to take place in early 2019.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-46334649

It was called by the excitement of the game.

Plus the EU will have France or Poland or the Nederlands or Ireland top nation leader.
Last edited by Bone357; 3 weeks ago at 06:22 AM..
 
Blackleaf
-1
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Bone357 View Post

It was called by the excitement of the game.

Plus the EU will have France or Poland or the Nederlands or Ireland top nation leader.

The top nation leader of the EU is Germany. Don't forget, the EU is nothing but a German empire set up to benefit German and only Germany.
 
Bone357
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The top nation leader of the EU is Germany. Don't forget, the EU is nothing but a German empire set up to benefit German and only Germany.

New nation is ready to fight back the EU.

Is an Catholic nation we will.

The EU is an empire like Rome.
 
Blackleaf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Bone357 View Post

The EU is an empire like Rome.

Yes, it is.

The only difference, for Britain at least, is that Rome brought us many great things: New roads, central heating, wine, fast food, plumbing and sanitation, new towns, new architecture, the basis for the calendar we use today, wealth.

The EU, on the other hand, has given Britain nothing of worth but, instead, Britain has been forced to hand over tens of billions of pounds to the EU every year and be smothered in needless economy-stifling bureaucracy and red tape.
 
White_Unifier
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Yes, it is.
The only difference, for Britain at least, is that Rome brought us many great things: New roads, central heating, wine, fast food, plumbing and sanitation, new towns, new architecture, the basis for the calendar we use today, wealth.
The EU, on the other hand, has given Britain nothing of worth but, instead, Britain has been forced to hand over tens of billions of pounds to the EU every year and be smothered in needless economy-stifling bureaucracy and red tape.

Didn't the EU give the UK free trade with it?

I can see another referendum coming, and in my opinion if that happens, it should be an option between remaining in the EU and unilateral global free trade. I'd probably vote in favour of unilateral global free trade myself due to the potential long-term benefits, and then brace for the short-to-medium-term impact.
 
White_Unifier
#7
The reason I would not propose including the present deal in among the options is that that is even worse than just remaining in the EU: you'd still need to abide by many of its rules bot have no say anymore as to what those rules will be.

The two best long-term options in my opinion are unilateral global free trade and remaining a member of the EU, with a reasonable debate on which is the best of those two options. But just leaving the EU but only technically is the worst option.
 
MHz
#8
I feel like this is a time portal to what happened a few years ago. since then the 'Russian collusion' pattern has been used so is this round 2 of how get nothing at all accomplished in the longest time frame possible, if so they deserve 5 stars for effect and a kick in the balls as the 'final solution' for be a fuktard..
 
Blackleaf
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

Didn't the EU give the UK free trade with it?

Well, trade between the UK and EU is in decline. The EU is becoming less important to the UK for trade every single year.
Quote:

I can see another referendum coming, and in my opinion if that happens, it should be an option between remaining in the EU and unilateral global free trade. I'd probably vote in favour of unilateral global free trade myself due to the potential long-term benefits, and then brace for the short-to-medium-term impact.

If there's another referendum - or a "People's Vote" as the Remainers put it, as though it wasn't people but vermin and lizards who went into the polling stations on 23rd June 2016 - then Leave would win again, by an even larger margin - unless the Leave half of the voting options is gerrymandered and split into two or three options, which is what the Remainers rather disgracefully want to happen and what you are implying.
 
White_Unifier
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

The reason I would not propose including the present deal in among the options is that that is even worse than just remaining in the EU: you'd still need to abide by many of its rules bot have no say anymore as to what those rules will be.
The two best long-term options in my opinion are unilateral global free trade and remaining a member of the EU, with a reasonable debate on which is the best of those two options. But just leaving the EU but only technically is the worst option.

I take that back. May's deal might make for a good transitory deal. Perhaps the UK should sign it but come next election, include a referendum on the ballot between keeping the May deal and unilateral global free trade.
 
White_Unifier
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Well, trade between the UK and EU is in decline. The EU is becoming less important to the UK for trade every single year.
If there's another referendum - or a "People's Vote" as the Remainers put it, as though it wasn't people but vermin and lizards who went into the polling stations on 23rd June 2016 - then Leave would win again, by an even larger margin - unless the Leave half of the voting options is gerrymandered and split into two or three options, which is what the Remainers rather disgracefully want to happen and what you are implying.

If there was a second referendum between remain and an ambiguous leave like last time, I'd vote remain and then May's plan would come into effect as meeting the minimum standard for leave. I would not be prepared to vote for some ambiguous concept like 'leave' with no clearer guidance than that. I suspect that many 'remainers' probably voted remain for the same reason I would have. 'Leave' is just not a clear option. I mean after all, technically May's plan does involve leaving the EU per se, just not leaving much of anything else that comes with it.

You change it to a choice between remain and unilateral global free trade, then I suspect more remainers would switch sides since then the alternative would be somewhat more clearly defined.
 
White_Unifier
#12
As I think about it, perhaps the next referendum should be between May's plan and unilateral global free trade. I'd vote the latter even though I'm aware that this would come with a painful transition period. I'd just be looking to the long term.
 
Blackleaf
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

The reason I would not propose including the present deal in among the options is that that is even worse than just remaining in the EU: you'd still need to abide by many of its rules bot have no say anymore as to what those rules will be.

Some, not all, EU laws will continue to apply in Britain but only up until the end of the transition period - 31st December 2020 - and will be enforced by the Commission and adjudicated by the European Court of Justice (ECJ) as usual. From 1st January 2021, all remaining EU laws will have no effect in Britain and Britain will leave the jurisdiction of the awful ECJ - the body which oftens prevents Britain from deporting Bulgarian child-murderers or Romanian pickpockets because of their "human rights".
 
White_Unifier
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Some, not all, EU laws will continue to apply in Britain but only up until the end of the transition period - 31st December 2020 - and will be enforced by the Commission and adjudicated by the European Court of Justice (ECJ) as usual. From 1st January 2021, all remaining EU laws will have no effect in Britain and Britain will leave the jurisdiction of the awful ECJ - the body which oftens prevents Britain from deporting Bulgarian child-murderers or Romanian pickpockets because of their "human rights".

Then why not include a referendum at the same time as the next election on unilateral global free trade starting in 2021? That would thus give UK businesses forewarning so that they know more precisely what will come after 2021.
 
Blackleaf
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

Then why not include a referendum at the same time as the next election on unilateral global free trade starting in 2021? That would thus give UK businesses forewarning so that they know more precisely what will come after 2021.

Did you know that the vast majority of British companies do no trade whatsoever with the EU?
 
White_Unifier
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Did you know that the vast majority of British companies do no trade whatsoever with the EU?

The UK trades more with the EU overall; but wouldn't unilatral global free trade benefit those business that don't and give the UK more freedom from the EU? I'm not saying no short-to-medium pain, but for the long-tem freedom it would give britons, that might be worthwhile. However, until you have a referendum on it, many Britons will keep pushing for some degree of EU integration. So you might as well nip that one in the bud and have a referendum on it. If the majority vote for unilateral global free trade, then that would make it hard for any future UK government to compromise that in any future deal.
 
Blackleaf
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

The UK trades more with the EU overall;

Most British exports now go outside the EU.
 
White_Unifier
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Most British exports now go outside the EU.

Well then that just makes the argument for unilateral global free trade even stronger.
 
Hoid
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The top nation leader of the EU is Germany. Don't forget, the EU is nothing but a German empire set up to benefit German and only Germany.

this is what makes you such a troll
 
Blackleaf
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

this is what makes you such a troll

 
Hoid
#21
the problem is that you are a stupid person who has no sense of humor.

kind of tough sledding for you.
 
Blackleaf
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

the problem is that you are a stupid person who has no sense of humor.
kind of tough sledding for you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CNeDtZmpjU
 
Hoid
#23
Let's see - massive cut and paste tabloid articles...animated gifs....youtube videos.

Yep - that pretty much covers your whole game.
 
Blackleaf
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Let's see - massive cut and paste tabloid articles...animated gifs....youtube videos.
Yep - that pretty much covers your whole game.

So not bothered about watching it. Just denying something which to many in Europe is patently obvious just because you like to believe it isn't true.
 
Hoid
#25
Nobody in North America gives a rats ass about brexit one way or the other.

You do understand that?

btw nobody is ever going to click a link provided by a troll.
 
Blackleaf
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Nobody in North America gives a rats ass about brexit one way or the other.

Obama does.
 
Blackleaf
#27
http://twitter.com/ClarkeMicah/statu...36717266001921
 
Ocean Breeze
Free Thinker
#28
https://www.bbc.com/news/video_and_a...-possible-deal

Best possible deal..
 
Ocean Breeze
Free Thinker
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Obama does.

actually, I and many others care. Have loved touring / visiting the UK........and wish only the best for them. Lovely folks.....in a nation so rich in history/ tradition. Have various UK friends who are avidly following this.
 
Bar Sinister
No Party Affiliation
+1
#30  Top Rated Post
The UK government says its Brexit deal will hurt the economy

https://www.cnn.com/2018/11/28/econo...act/index.html