How law enforcement uses social media


LisaDe
#1
Hey All,

This is literally my third attempt at this post. Not sure why it doesn't work - perhaps because I put links in the post? Hopefully it works this time! ...The momo challenges got me thinking about this and I started exploring the topic to get some information. I hope you'll share your thoughts on it as well. I wrote a piece on how police use social media to fight crimes and came up with 5 ways they do. It's interesting because while we're scrolling over facebook posts of cats; there is law enforcement using Facebook to catch criminals. Here's the five ways I came up with....(p.s sorry it's written in essay form, I'm a student so that's the easiest write I can write my thoughts).

1.Protecting citizens from danger: In a 2016 ‘Law Enforcement Use of Social Media’ Survey conducted by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and Urban Institute, 91% of the 539 law enforcement agencies reported that they use social media to ‘notify the public of safety concerns’. More than 80% of the agencies who use social media utilize it as a way of engaging with the public and notifying people of dangers (some of which are non-crime issues like emergency info, and road closures). For example, on Aug 3rd 2018, the Toronto Police twitter page informed Torontians about the location of an unidentified package in the busy streets of Toronto, thereby letting the public know to avoid the area until the threat was destabilized. Another example is the police’s use of twitter on the tragic shooting that took place on August 10th in Fredericton, New Brunswick. While the shooting was active, Fredericton Police were quick to inform the public via Twitter updates about the dangers in the area and warned residents to remain inside their homes until the threat was over.
2.Using social media to gain evidence and uncover details in a case: In line with the 2016 National American survey, the Joffe Law firm’s blog explains that police use Facebook and Twitter to gain evidence for court. Facebook can be used to identify suspects, obtain incriminating information, solicit tips on crimes, and find key details in pending cases. Police can legally create fake accounts to communicate with suspects and can even access private accounts if it’s for good cause. In some cases, police don’t have to work too hard to find suspects: in Milwaukee, Jeffrey S. Kirk was arrested by police, after broadcasting his drug dealings on Facebook Live.
3.Locating victims, or suspects in a crime: In an article by the University of Cincinnati, the author explains that social media is a vital tool for spreading Amber Alerts rapidly, and locating criminals on the loose. Emily Vacher, former FBI agent and director of Trust and Safety at Facebook, quoted in an article on News.com.au explains: “Speed is critical [for saving children’s lives]. Research indicates that of those children who are going to be killed, 75 per cent will be killed in the first four hours.” Ms. Vacher goes on to say that lives have been saved by police officials using Facebook to share amber alerts.
4.Using apps to their advantage: Most people by now have heard of Waze (a navigation app that happens to alert users where police are doing speed traps). Some police officials are now using the same app to engage with the public. For example, CBC Boston reported in Pelham, that N.H; police officers used the Waze app to let users know of their presence at a local speed trap, reminding users to watch their speed and drive safely. It sends a message to users that law enforcement is on top of new technology that is being used against them. It also reminds us that police officials enforce these rules to save our lives. Just as police officers are aware of Waze; they remain vigilant of other popular apps – including those that are dangerous for the public, particular children.
5.Public engagement: The 2016 National American survey on law enforcement use of social media reports that close to 90% of the police agencies who participated in the survey reported using social media for citizen engagement, public relations, reputation management, and community outreach. In an article by the University of Cincinnati, social media is explained as valuable way to introduce new officers to the team, highlight achievements, pay tribute to deceased colleagues, encourage interest in law enforcement careers, post vacancies in the department, and invite the community to public events (e.g. the police parade). This humanizes the police force and creates a bond between citizens and police officers – trust and faith in our police department is vital. If citizens feel protected, they will feel more inclined to report crimes and engage police on important matters.

While police officers are using social media as tool in law enforcement, it's good to note that some private investigation agencies are also up-to-date on the latest technologies. For example, the private investigation agency, Haywood Hunt and Associates Inc (www.haywoodhunt.ca) has a section of their website dedicated to social media services such as: Online & In Depth Social Media Research, Public Database Inquiries, Digital Footprint Investigations, Fact Finding and Vetting, Online Activity Monitoring, Asset Tracking, Accessing Deleted Information, Surveillance, and Location Tracking. These types of agencies utilize social media in their investigations and surveillance in similar ways that police officials do. Together, law enforcement continues its fight against crime by adapting to new technologies as they become available.

So this is my thoughts on it, and I hope someone will share their opinions as well. Do you think it's a good thing that law enforcement can use social media?
 
Walter
+1
#2
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AXwGVXD7qEQ
 
LisaDe
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AXwGVXD7qEQ

haha! Thank you Walter!!
 
taxslave
#4
Proves their collective IQ is above room temperature.
 
LisaDe
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Proves their collective IQ is above room temperature.

Do you believe that they should not have access to social media? I certainly see the benefits of it.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by LisaDe View Post

Hey All,

This is literally my third attempt at this post. Not sure why it doesn't work - perhaps because I put links in the post? Hopefully it works this time! ...The momo challenges got me thinking about this and I started exploring the topic to get some information. I hope you'll share your thoughts on it as well. I wrote a piece on how police use social media to fight crimes and came up with 5 ways they do. It's interesting because while we're scrolling over facebook posts of cats; there is law enforcement using Facebook to catch criminals. Here's the five ways I came up with....(p.s sorry it's written in essay form, I'm a student so that's the easiest write I can write my thoughts).

1.Protecting citizens from danger: In a 2016 ‘Law Enforcement Use of Social Media’ Survey conducted by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and Urban Institute, 91% of the 539 law enforcement agencies reported that they use social media to ‘notify the public of safety concerns’. More than 80% of the agencies who use social media utilize it as a way of engaging with the public and notifying people of dangers (some of which are non-crime issues like emergency info, and road closures). For example, on Aug 3rd 2018, the Toronto Police twitter page informed Torontians about the location of an unidentified package in the busy streets of Toronto, thereby letting the public know to avoid the area until the threat was destabilized. Another example is the police’s use of twitter on the tragic shooting that took place on August 10th in Fredericton, New Brunswick. While the shooting was active, Fredericton Police were quick to inform the public via Twitter updates about the dangers in the area and warned residents to remain inside their homes until the threat was over.
2.Using social media to gain evidence and uncover details in a case: In line with the 2016 National American survey, the Joffe Law firm’s blog explains that police use Facebook and Twitter to gain evidence for court. Facebook can be used to identify suspects, obtain incriminating information, solicit tips on crimes, and find key details in pending cases. Police can legally create fake accounts to communicate with suspects and can even access private accounts if it’s for good cause. In some cases, police don’t have to work too hard to find suspects: in Milwaukee, Jeffrey S. Kirk was arrested by police, after broadcasting his drug dealings on Facebook Live.
3.Locating victims, or suspects in a crime: In an article by the University of Cincinnati, the author explains that social media is a vital tool for spreading Amber Alerts rapidly, and locating criminals on the loose. Emily Vacher, former FBI agent and director of Trust and Safety at Facebook, quoted in an article on News.com.au explains: “Speed is critical [for saving children’s lives]. Research indicates that of those children who are going to be killed, 75 per cent will be killed in the first four hours.” Ms. Vacher goes on to say that lives have been saved by police officials using Facebook to share amber alerts.
4.Using apps to their advantage: Most people by now have heard of Waze (a navigation app that happens to alert users where police are doing speed traps). Some police officials are now using the same app to engage with the public. For example, CBC Boston reported in Pelham, that N.H; police officers used the Waze app to let users know of their presence at a local speed trap, reminding users to watch their speed and drive safely. It sends a message to users that law enforcement is on top of new technology that is being used against them. It also reminds us that police officials enforce these rules to save our lives. Just as police officers are aware of Waze; they remain vigilant of other popular apps – including those that are dangerous for the public, particular children.
5.Public engagement: The 2016 National American survey on law enforcement use of social media reports that close to 90% of the police agencies who participated in the survey reported using social media for citizen engagement, public relations, reputation management, and community outreach. In an article by the University of Cincinnati, social media is explained as valuable way to introduce new officers to the team, highlight achievements, pay tribute to deceased colleagues, encourage interest in law enforcement careers, post vacancies in the department, and invite the community to public events (e.g. the police parade). This humanizes the police force and creates a bond between citizens and police officers – trust and faith in our police department is vital. If citizens feel protected, they will feel more inclined to report crimes and engage police on important matters.

While police officers are using social media as tool in law enforcement, it's good to note that some private investigation agencies are also up-to-date on the latest technologies. For example, the private investigation agency, Haywood Hunt and Associates Inc (www.haywoodhunt.ca) has a section of their website dedicated to social media services such as: Online & In Depth Social Media Research, Public Database Inquiries, Digital Footprint Investigations, Fact Finding and Vetting, Online Activity Monitoring, Asset Tracking, Accessing Deleted Information, Surveillance, and Location Tracking. These types of agencies utilize social media in their investigations and surveillance in similar ways that police officials do. Together, law enforcement continues its fight against crime by adapting to new technologies as they become available.

So this is my thoughts on it, and I hope someone will share their opinions as well. Do you think it's a good thing that law enforcement can use social media?

They probably use forums like this to gather intel. to fill up their "dangerous lunatic" files.
Last edited by Curious Cdn; Aug 29th, 2018 at 12:07 PM..
 
LisaDe
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

They probably use forums like this to gsther intel. to fill up their "dangerous lunatic" files.

Haha, I am totally not working for the police! lol. I am a student
 
Curious Cdn
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by LisaDe View Post

Haha, I am totally not working for the police! lol. I am a student

Feel free. There are some borderline maniacs on here.

Do you like to read wacko conspiracy theories? You can learn a fresh one every day. You only need to fear the armed ones who believe that to give an entitlement.
 
LisaDe
+1
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Feel free. There are some borderline maniacs on here.

Do you like to read wacko conspiracy theories? You can learn a fresh one every day. You only need to fear the armed ones who believe that to give an entitlement.

I'm just looking to engage people on this topic, and this is a good place to improve my writing skills. Do you have any opinions about law enforcements use of social media?
 
taxslave
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by LisaDe View Post

Do you believe that they should not have access to social media? I certainly see the benefits of it.

Until now I didn't believe most of them were capable of it. Nor do I much care.
I can see good points like Amber Alert and notices of floods/ fires etc.
 
Curious Cdn
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by LisaDe View Post

I'm just looking to engage people on this topic, and this is a good place to improve my writing skills. Do you have any opinions about law enforcements use of social media?

There is so much data bring generated. Do law enforcement agencies vett forums, chat sites, etc. by search engines looking for key words and phrases?
 
LisaDe
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

There is so much data bring generated. Do law enforcement agencies vett forums, chat sites, etc. by search engines looking for key words and phrases?

https://www.wcvb.com/article/boston-...media/16751692

The police were under fire for finding people using their hashtags... because it was politically motivated instead of because of criminal reasons.

Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Until now I didn't believe most of them were capable of it. Nor do I much care.
I can see good points like Amber Alert and notices of floods/ fires etc.

Yes, definitely for amber alerts. I also don't mind if they gain access to a criminals profile .... I guess people worry about what comes after that. Facebook and Twitter have good protocols though so that not everyone's profiles can be accessed.
 
Mowich
+3
#13  Top Rated Post
I'm fine with police forces using all legal means available to help catch criminals, warn the public of dangerous offenders let loose in their communities and issue alerts. Using social media to do so just makes sense.
 
LisaDe
+1
#14
I totally agree with you Mowich. I feel the same way.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by LisaDe View Post

I totally agree with you Mowich. I feel the same way.

Me three.
 
Mowich
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by LisaDe View Post

I totally agree with you Mowich. I feel the same way.


Glad to see that you were finally able to post your topic, Lisa - and a good one it is. Welcome to the forum.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#17
We have a perpetual "gun control" thread on which everything that can be said was said a long, long time ago but the thread's main proponent "bumps" it up regularly lest it disappear forever from all memory. If you are sufficiently fanatical about your beliefs, you can keep an essentially empty argument going on indefinitely.
Last edited by Curious Cdn; Aug 29th, 2018 at 01:01 PM..
 
LisaDe
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Glad to see that you were finally able to post your topic, Lisa - and a good one it is. Welcome to the forum.

Thank you.

Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

We have a perpetual "gun control" thread on which everything that can be said was said a long, long time ago but the thread's main proponent "bumps" it up regularly lest it disappear forever from all memory. If you are sufficiently fanatical about your beliefs, you can keep an essentially empty argument going on indefinitely.

I assume every time there is a shooting, the gun control thread gets bumped back up? I bet its a lengthy form...many people on both sides.
 
OpposingDigit
#19
With all the surveillance surrounding us, it seems that every day we wake up naked, and walk down the street naked, and socialize on-line naked. And worse ..... they then shame us all with the question .... “Why should you care about being naked if you have nothing to hide?”
 
LisaDe
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by OpposingDigit View Post

With all the surveillance surrounding us, it seems that every day we wake up naked, and walk down the street naked, and socialize on-line naked. And worse ..... they then shame us all with the question .... “Why should you care about being naked if you have nothing to hide?”

Hmm, I can understand your point. But at the same time, when we choose to put ourselves online on these social media platforms (aka companies), should we really expect the data to be ours? You're providing a company with info then saying well, I don't want you to use that info. I mean, I guess in a perfect world we could expect that but it's not realistic.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#21
Open platforms I have no problem with them using the info but private info shared within a parameter e.g. information search, job application, health issues, etc. not a chance

Let's not forget the company is requesting the info from you privacy must be protected
 
LisaDe
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Open platforms I have no problem with them using the info but private info shared within a parameter e.g. information search, job application, health issues, etc. not a chance

Let's not forget the company is requesting the info from you privacy must be protected

There is a lot of debate about this today. While our phones sit on the table, they are sending data out. When we check out email, sometimes our data is being sent out. There is zero privacy. Best thing to do is not post anything you don't want people to know; I think.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#23
phone information and emails are private information and conversations period, any info obtained studied, or passed on should be prosecuted as hacking and theft
 
LisaDe
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

phone information and emails are private information and conversations period, any info obtained studied, or passed on should be prosecuted as hacking and theft

even useless data? I think a lot of the time they just want to know what our fav restaurants are, or what shows we watch.
 
White_Unifier
#25
It's easy to stay at least quasi-anonymous online. While the police could identify a quasi-anonymous only personality, they would still need much effort to do so. I personally think we should be required to register SIMs myself.
 
LisaDe
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

It's easy to stay at least quasi-anonymous online. While the police could identify a quasi-anonymous only personality, they would still need much effort to do so. I personally think we should be required to register SIMs myself.

What do you mean? like register our identity's on social media?
 
White_Unifier
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by LisaDe View Post

What do you mean? like register our identity's on social media?

No, just register the SIM. It would still allow a certain degree of anonymity on social media and still impose some effort on the police to identify you, but just not quite as much as is now the case if you use a registered SIM.

By the way, are you a French-speaker?
 
Mowich
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by OpposingDigit View Post

“Why should you care about being naked if you have nothing to hide?”


You've given me an entirely different perspective on the comportment of city people.
 
White_Unifier
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

You've given me an entirely different perspective on the comportment of city people.

I'm an urban male and I've always dressed modestly since as far back as I can remember.
 
OpposingDigit
#30
All data collected by corporations or entities should be forced into storing it on servers situated within the country of origin. Canadians should not need to beg a U.S. justice system for redress. Plus; Canada could then have control of all data collected/shared.

There should be an option ..... pay for absolute privacy or not. I would have no problem paying FaceBook 50 bucks per year for privacy, just like I have no problem paying 50 bucks per year for virus protection.
 

Similar Threads

72
Is Social Media making us Stupider
by Johnnny | Mar 22nd, 2018
0
More NDP social media cleansing
by Locutus | Sep 26th, 2015