The rage against Boris


Blackleaf
#1
The e-petition against Boris ending the longest parliamentary session since the build-up to the English Civil War doesn't stand up to scrutiny when you investigate where the signatories are from...

The rage against Boris

Brendan O'Neill
29 August 2019
The Spectator



This morning, a petition demanding ‘Do not prorogue Parliament’ is doing the rounds. At the time of writing, more than 1.4 million people have signed it. Remainers are very excited. They’re holding the petition up as proof of a mass outpouring of democratic disdain for Boris Johnson’s decision to suspend Parliament for a few more days than is normal. It is no such thing. It looks more like yet another middle-class hissy fit against Brexit and the people who voted for it.

As the petition map demonstrates, the signatories are strikingly concentrated in certain parts of the country, especially the leafy, super-middle-class bits of southern England. There are very high numbers of signatures from Brighton, Hove, Oxfordshire and Cambridgeshire; and in London from Islington, Dulwich, Wood Green, Hackney, Richmond and Twickenham.

All of these areas have large numbers of working-class and poor inhabitants, of course. But they are also known, correctly, as the heartlands of the metropolitan middle classes. Some of the parts of London in which people have enthusiastically embraced the petition are especially posh: Dulwich, Richmond, Twickenham.

Far from being an expression of national fury with Boris’s proroguing plans, the petition strikingly confirms the massive class-based and geographical divides over Brexit. So where, at the time of writing, 7.4 per cent of voters in Caroline Lucas’s Brighton Pavilion constituency have signed this anti-Boris, anti-proroguing petition, just 0.6 per cent of constituents in Doncaster North have signed it.

So far, in Islington 6.3 per cent of constituents have signed; in Dulwich, it’s 6.1 per cent; in Richmond, it’s five per cent. But in Rochdale, it’s 0.7 per cent; in Boston and Skegness, it’s 0.5 per cent; in Merthyr Tydfil it’s 0.8 per cent; in Dagenham it’s 0.5 per cent.

And so on and so on. The posher the area, the more likely people are to have signed. The more working-class the area, the more likely people are to have thought to themselves: ‘Sod that.’

And it isn’t hard to see why, because for all the claims that this is a pro-democracy petition, it is nothing of the kind. Take a look at the wording of the petition. It is quite extraordinary. It says:

‘Parliament must not be prorogued or dissolved unless and until the Article 50 period has been sufficiently extended or the UK’s intention to withdraw from the EU has been cancelled.’ (My emphasis.)

Take that in. This petition isn’t even against the proroguing of Parliament as such — it is only against the proroguing of Parliament by Boris Johnson for the purpose of forcing Brexit through. The petition explicitly says that proroguing or dissolving Parliament is fine once Brexit has either been kicked into the long grass (through extending Article 50) or destroyed entirely (through cancellation).

This is in keeping with the broader hypocritical hysteria over Boris’s plans to suspend Parliament for a few more days than normal. The furious reaction against Boris is not driven by a desire to defend democracy, whether of the parliamentary or any other variety. Rather, it is driven by anger at the fact that MPs, the majority of whom are Remainers, will be temporarily robbed of the ability to continue thwarting and potentially even killing Brexit. They rage against Boris for being anti-democratic on the basis that he is making it more difficult for anti-Brexit MPs to frustrate the largest act of democracy in the history of this country — you couldn’t make it up.

Just imagine what is going through the minds of people around the country, outside of the woke, Brexitphobic bubbles in the south that so many politicos and commentators inhabit. Imagine what they think as they watch MPs who have spent three years trying to frustrate the democratic will suddenly present themselves as defenders of democracy against Boris the ‘tinpot dictator’. Imagine what they think as they see footage of middle-class people having a picnic, complete with olives and bubbly, in the middle of yesterday’s protest against proroguing.

This petition gives us a glimpse of what they think. From South Wales to the Midlands, from the North West to Essex, so many people must be looking upon the metropolitan elites that loathe Brexit as eejits, hypocrites and liars.
https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2019/0...against-boris/
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
+1
#2  Top Rated Post
In a democracy, it shouldn't matter where the signatures come from - so long as they're not fake signatures.

That these people are being blown off is a sign that your 'democracy' isn't in fact a democracy.

Personally they don't have a hope in hell of it achieving anything, yet I have to wonder, if many more people sign it, like a LOT more, I would look at it as a sign that BoJo is in serious trouble once he calls the General.
 
Ocean Breeze
Free Thinker
#3
Allies of Johnson resign amid outrage over suspension of Parliament
Prime Minister Boris Johnson faced defections from senior Conservatives in a sign of rising worry that the move to suspend Parliament was sidelining elected representatives during a crisis.


source: WAPO
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#4
I'm not sure it's that BoJo prorogued parliament that really has people going too much about it. Rather that his doing so stops any debate, any talks and any actual democratic process towards how Brexit is handled. Yeah, Remainers would continue to push for an end to the issue, but even those who would be for Brexit think stopping parliament is a bad idea.


I've heard the word Coup thrown around too; not sure that it is but it's toting the line to it I think for sure.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

In a democracy, it shouldn't matter where the signatures come from - so long as they're not fake signatures.

They are all Remoaners' signatures, mate. And 1 million signatures is tiny compared to the 17.4 million Leave voters. THAT'S democracy for you.
Quote:

That these people are being blown off is a sign that your 'democracy' isn't in fact a democracy.

I agree. Our democracy isn't a democracy thanks, of course, to all those Remainers who have spent three years trying to overturn the biggest democratic vote in British history who then have the gall to call Boris "undemocratic" because he's trying to honour that democratic vote.
Quote:

Personally they don't have a hope in hell of it achieving anything, yet I have to wonder, if many more people sign it, like a LOT more, I would look at it as a sign that BoJo is in serious trouble once he calls the General.

The General Election is a battle between a government trying to implement democracy and those trying to overturn it. There's only one winner.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

I'm not sure it's that BoJo prorogued parliament that really has people going too much about it. Rather that his doing so stops any debate, any talks and any actual democratic process towards how Brexit is handled. Yeah, Remainers would continue to push for an end to the issue, but even those who would be for Brexit think stopping parliament is a bad idea.
I've heard the word Coup thrown around too; not sure that it is but it's toting the line to it I think for sure.

I'll tell you what a coup is: the Remainers trying to overturn a democratically elected government and then set up an entirely unelected Remainer government in Church House to try and overturn democracy. That is THE definition of a coup.

Boris Johnson doing something which is entirely normal - it happens every year and, in fact, this is merely ending the longest sitting of Parliament for 400 years - in order to honour the people's democratic decision, and doing something which many Remainers wanted to happen just several months ago - isn't. It's a normal Britsh parliamentary process.
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

I'll tell you what a coup is: the Remainers trying to overturn a democratically elected government and then set up an entirely unelected Remainer government in Church House to try and overturn democracy. That is THE definition of a coup.

Boris Johnson doing something which is entirely normal - it happens every year and, in fact, this is merely ending the longest sitting of Parliament for 400 years - in order to honour the people's democratic decision, and doing something which many Remainers wanted to happen just several months ago - isn't. It's a normal Britsh parliamentary process.


Link to your source that remainers are trying to set up an unelected government?


If it's normal, then why are so many people - even politicians and members of his own party - freaking out over what he's done?


If BoJo wanted to 'honor' people's democracy, he would continue Parliament, not prorogue it. Regardless of whether he likes it or not, there are people right now elected to try and either stop Brexit, OR keep a 'no deal' 'hard' Brexit from happening. Instead of trying to work with them though, he's basically thumbing his nose at them and cheating them and the people who elected them out of their say. And since BoJo was not the Generally Elected PM, but specially selected one, right now he holds accountability to anyone.


It's not that he's proroguing really, but the reason for it, and the length of time that has people pissed, and rightly so. This is their country and he doesn't give a shit what people think, which is not how democracy works.


He might have won Brexit with this, but he will not survive the next GE.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

Link to your source that remainers are trying to set up an unelected government?

It's well-known that Remainers have been proposing to oust the democratically-elected government and set up an unelected Remainer government in Church House, where parliament sat during WWII.

Quote:

If it's normal, then why are so many people - even politicians and members of his own party - freaking out over what he's done?

Remainers are freaking out over it because it gives them less time to overturn Brexit (democracy).

And the proroguing of parliament is normal. In fact, this has been the longest sitting of parliament for 400 years. Usually it has been prorogued by now.

Have you never heard of the Official Opening of Parliament and the Queen's Speech, or did you think that parrliament always sits all year round?

Quote:

If BoJo wanted to 'honor' people's democracy, he would continue Parliament, not prorogue it.

The prorogation of parliament happens every year. After a certain number of weeks, it is then officially reopened by the Queen at the State Opening of Parliament. It happens in Canada, too, of course - you know, that ceremony that Black Rod takes part in.

It's not an unusual and undemocratic occurrence. It's normal parliamentary procedure.

Now, either these Reemainer protesters marching against the proroguing of Parliament arre, like you, completely oblivious to the fact that Parliament is prorogued every year and they've never heard of the State Opening of Parliament and the Queen's Speech or they are only too aware of this yet they are taking part in marches against THIS particular prorogation of Parliament because they know it's scuppering their chances of overturning democracy - so they are taking part in anti-democracy marches.

Either way, it's not a good thing these Remainer protesters are doing. They're either ignorant or anti-democratic.

Quote:

Regardless of whether he likes it or not, there are people right now elected to try and either stop Brexit,

84% of MPs were elected on a mandate of honouring Brexit.

Quote:

OR keep a 'no deal' 'hard' Brexit from happening.

Under the May government MPs had THREE opportunities to accept her deal. She took it to the Commons THREE times and on each occasion MPs - who are mainly Remainers - REJECTED it. So they've had three opportunities to accept a deal and yet, on each occasion, they rejected it.

So if they aren't able to prevent a No Deal happening in all those months, due to their own actions, then want chance have they got in preventing it now? Even if Boris didn't proprogue Parliament, they'd only have an extra four of five days of sitting in the Commons.

A No Deal Brexit - meaning leaving the EU without a deal with the EU (although Britain could leave the EU with deals with other countries but it'd still be No Deal if there isn't one with the EU) - would entirely be the fault of the Remainers, not Boris and the Leavers. It is the Remainers who have three times rejected the Government's deal with the EU.

Quote:

It's not that he's proroguing really, but the reason for it

The reason is to stop Remainer MPs overturning democracy. Boris is protecting democracy from those undemocratic Remainers who want to overturn democracy and who are, right now, and without a hint of irony, calling him "undemocratic."
Last edited by Blackleaf; 2 weeks ago at 05:34 AM..
 
Blackleaf
+1
#9
Prorogation and the politics of the English language


Prorogation happens frequently, and for good reason (this time included). There’s nothing interesting or new about it, except that, this time, Remainers have decided to scandalise it. (Above) The Queen's Speech in May 2016, which followed the prorogation of Parliament

Kate Andrews
30 August 2019
The Spectator

Funny how language changes over time. Or rather, how we change language to advance our agenda.

Sometimes it’s a natural process, a long process – what works survives and what’s easy thrives. The word ‘smart’ originated as something to describe pain or a stinging sensation. The ‘sting’ associated with the word moved to an understanding of ‘quickness’ or ‘intensity’, and is now used today to describe intelligence and wit. ‘She’s the smart one on those benches’ we might utter, to spark fierce debate and disagreement in these politically tumultuous times.

‘Smug’ started out with surprisingly positive connotations, used to describe those who took care of their appearance, coming across tidy and well kept. No longer a rousing endorsement of someone’s character, it’s become an insult of fairy large proportion, levelled at the commentator on the news round-up you never agree with.

Even ‘fun’ – something totally absent in politics these days – has morphed into something with essentially the opposite meaning of its current use. Knowing it was originally understood as a verb ‘to cheat’ or ‘trick’, I’m sure many could find good use for it in their current commentary on the Brexit debate.

Words and meanings change. It happens in everyday life, and it happens on a much more extreme scale in political life.

The ‘detention centres’ along America’s southern border which hold unaccompanied migrant children were not a huge topic of debate during President Barack Obama’s tenure in the Oval Office. Almost overnight, these became ‘cages’ under President Trump, despite their terrible conditions remaining largely unchanged from the previous administration. ‘Executive Orders’ – which Obama gloated about when he put pen to paper – are now ‘autocracy’ under Trump.

Here in the UK, getting the rich to pay their ‘fair share’ of tax is dubbed a ‘dementia tax’ if it ends up in the wrong party’s manifesto.

Dangerous, carbon-emitting activity is ‘humanitarian outreach’ if Harry and Meghan are the ones on the private jet.

Energy price caps proposed by Ed Miliband are… energy price caps implemented by Theresa May. Sometimes you don’t even need to change your language to re-write history and get away with it (political history anyway, the consequences of the policy itself will be unmasked in due time).

But perhaps one of the most egregious adaptions (egregious: another morpher), will be the new definition of ‘proroguing’ which has swept the UK and beyond in a 48 hour window.

Before our new, politically toxic definition of proroguing took hold, we would have understood the suspension of Parliament to be a frequent but mundane calendar staple, when the Queen’s Speech takes place.

Some rituals movements would happen in the Commons and get aired on TV. We’d comment on Corbyn’s facial expressions while they took place, the Queen would read out her government-approved script. The suspension of Government would be fleeting and activity would resume as normal.

This year, because it’s politically convenient, proroguing Parliament for the Queen’s Speech is ‘trashing our democracy’, ‘archaic’, and according to Wednesday’s protesters ‘a coup’.

Being able to utter such absurdities is a luxury only granted to those who have never known anything but a safe, strong and guarded democracy, in which their rights are upheld and their vote always counts.

Yet everyone has fed into the conjectured celebrations and outrage. Brexiteers toasting the suspension of Parliament to secure the UK’s exit from the EU have been just as misleading on the topic as the cries from Remainers of dictatorship and cancelling of democratic processes.

It’s a political storm in a tea-cup (as pointed out by many already, this year’s prorogation amounts to a grand total of three additional days Parliament won’t be sitting, tacked on to the party conference season recess). Prorogation happens frequently, and for good reason (this time included). There’s nothing interesting or new about it, except that we’ve decided to scandalise it.

The damage will not be to political processes, or even to the outcome of Brexit. There is still time for MPs who deride the result of 17.4 million votes to try to do something about it.

The damage will be to our already fractured, often impenetrable political discourse, which paints our political opponents as the worst-intentioned people, the most evil of sinners, the devil incarnate.

How timely, that during Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson’s resignation remarks yesterday, she ended by calling for improved discussion and dialogue.

‘Improve’ – now meant ‘to better’ – stems from ‘to one’s profit’. Whose agenda is advancing, who is profiting, really, from the degrading and demoralising of our debate?

https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2019/0...lish-language/
 
Blackleaf
+1
#10
The Great Meltdown

Read Tom Slater’s editorial from this week’s spiked newsletter.



Tom Slater
Deputy Editor

30th August 2019
Spiked



This was the week the British bourgeoisie officially lost the plot. Boris Johnson’s decision to prorogue parliament – shaving off a few days of time MPs were counting on to thwart Brexit – has excited elite Remainers’ feverish imaginations like never before. They have compared it to the Reichstag Fire and themselves to the French Resistance. They have wept and hollered and protested – puntastic placard in one hand and designer dog in the other.

This isn’t about Johnson’s cynical – though hardly dictatorial – prorogation. This is about Brexit. What horrifies these people is not Johnson’s trimming of the parliamentary timetable, but the temerity of the 17.4million to demand more democracy, and the chance that they might just get it. The cognitive dissonance is perfectly summed up in the Remainers’ new favourite slogan – ‘Save Democracy, Stop Brexit’.

But The Great Meltdown has shown us something else, too. That these people haven’t just been driven to rage by Brexit, but to a kind of madness. The Brexit vote was for them not just a defeat, but an abomination. It shouldn’t have happened. It couldn’t have happened in any reasonable world – in which People Like Them call the shots and People Like Us are quietly grateful.

By challenging the elites’ right to rule, Brexit tugs at the threads of the intellects of our supposedly rational betters. And the unravelling continues. Brexit continues to drive them mad – and so it should.

https://www.spiked-online.com/2019/0...ter-editorial/
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

It's well-known that Remainers have been proposing to oust the democratically-elected government and set up an unelected Remainer government in Church House, where parliament sat during WWII.


Then you can provide proof for it, otherwise you 're blowing smoke out of your ass, again.


Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Remainers are freaking out over it because it gives them less time to overturn Brexit (democracy).


And by proroguing parliament, they're preventing democracy. But obviously you to avoid democracy is better than to work with it.


Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

And the proroguing of parliament is normal. In fact, this has been the longest sitting of parliament for 400 years. Usually it has been prorogued by now.


That is, from what I've read elsewhere, true. Considering the circumstances, I don't see why this is a bad idea to keep your elected people on the job so they can get the job done.


Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Have you never heard of the Official Opening of Parliament and the Queen's Speech, or did you think that parrliament always sits all year round?


Contrary to what you might think, I do know how the proceedings are run, yes.


Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The prorogation of parliament happens every year. After a certain number of weeks, it is then officially reopened by the Queen at the State Opening of Parliament. It happens in Canada, too, of course - you know, that ceremony that Black Rod takes part in.


Exactly. I've even watched the Speech from the Throne when I was taking Poly Sci in high school; found it fascinating.


Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

It's not an unusual and undemocratic occurrence. It's normal parliamentary procedure.


No, it's not, under *normal* circumstances. Brexit, and the future of Britain, is hardly normal. I'm just impressed they were on the job for so long; too bad it doesn't happen more often.


Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Now, either these Reemainer protesters marching against the proroguing of Parliament arre, like you, completely oblivious to the fact that Parliament is prorogued every year and they've never heard of the State Opening of Parliament and the Queen's Speech or they are only too aware of this yet they are taking part in marches against THIS particular prorogation of Parliament because they know it's scuppering their chances of overturning democracy - so they are taking part in anti-democracy marches.


Just like this proroguing of government is also anti-democratic, IMO. Sadly, I don't think the Queen had any choice but to go with it.


Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Either way, it's not a good thing these Remainer protesters are doing. They're either ignorant or anti-democratic.

84% of MPs were elected on a mandate of honouring Brexit.

Under the May government MPs had THREE opportunities to accept her deal. She took it to the Commons THREE times and on each occasion MPs - who are mainly Remainers - REJECTED it. So they've had three opportunities to accept a deal and yet, on each occasion, they rejected it.

So if they aren't able to prevent a No Deal happening in all those months, due to their own actions, then want chance have they got in preventing it now? Even if Boris didn't proprogue Parliament, they'd only have an extra four of five days of sitting in the Commons.

A No Deal Brexit - meaning leaving the EU without a deal with the EU (although Britain could leave the EU with deals with other countries but it'd still be No Deal if there isn't one with the EU) - would entirely be the fault of the Remainers, not Boris and the Leavers. It is the Remainers who have three times rejected the Government's deal with the EU.

The reason is to stop Remainer MPs overturning democracy. Boris is protecting democracy from those undemocratic Remainers who want to overturn democracy and who are, right now, and without a hint of irony, calling him "undemocratic."


And the rest is your usual tripe.

I'll point out that BoJo is not May - or did you not notice the changes between the two people - and if BoJo wants to do Brexit with a deal, he should be willing to work for it. As you said, May's deal was voted on, and lost. That's WHY she's not PM anymore. Now it's BoJo's turn. Except it's obvious he DOESN'T and THAT is why the prorogue. He's too chickenshit to even try to work with people, which makes him WORSE than May. I may not have liked the woman - she was a freakin' moron - but she did try at least. That's something more than BoJo is willing to do.

I don't see how the Remainers would be at fault, when BoJo isn't even willing to nut up and face them with a deal that everyone can try to work with. BTW, yes, the Remainers are being stupid at this point; they lost, they need to nut up too and work with those in power to do what's best for Britain. It's over, done... do your jobs. I think now it's more a matter of typical, stubborn British pride than common sense though.

Kind'a like you when you're proven wrong about something. Delusional to the end.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

And by proroguing parliament, they're preventing democracy. But obviously you to avoid democracy is better than to work with it.

So proroguing parliament to protect democracy from being overturned by undemocratic Remainers is "undemocratic" ?

You've got the same bizarre logic as those cry-baby avocado-and-kale munching middle class Remain protesters.
Last edited by Blackleaf; 2 weeks ago at 06:40 AM..
 
Blackleaf
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

And the rest is your usual tripe.

It's a reasonable assessment of the reality as to which you are ignorant of, plainly.
Quote:

and if BoJo wants to do Brexit with a deal, he should be willing to work for it.

Erm, the EU has consistently said that there is to be no other Withdrawal Agreement. According to the EU itself, it's either May's Deal or No Deal.

All those Remainer MPs who voted down May's Deal THREE times knew this, yet they still voted it down, so their anger over the looming of No Deal and blaming it on Boris is a bit weird. No Deal Brexit would be THEIR fault.
 
Blackleaf
#14
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vIhB8GnzXaw
 
Mowich
Conservative
#15
Boris is the right man at the right time and I hope that he succeeds, BL. What no one seems to be addressing is that the autonomy of the British people is at stake. What country in the world would be stupid enough to let their laws be dictated by other countries.
 
Hoid
#16
Looks like Harper actually did help out with the Brexit
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

So proroguing parliament to protect democracy from being overturned by undemocratic Remainers is "undemocratic" ?

You've got the same bizarre logic as those cry-baby avocado-and-kale munching middle class Remain protesters.


I don't like avocado or kale. Too preppy.


And you still haven't given links to prove your claim Remainers are trying to overthrow your government in secret.
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

It's a reasonable assessment of the reality as to which you are ignorant of, plainly.


Erm, the EU has consistently said that there is to be no other Withdrawal Agreement. According to the EU itself, it's either May's Deal or No Deal.

All those Remainer MPs who voted down May's Deal THREE times knew this, yet they still voted it down, so their anger over the looming of No Deal and blaming it on Boris is a bit weird. No Deal Brexit would be THEIR fault.


And you're an idiot if you think the EU will just stick with that one deal. Did it ever occur to you that this could be a tactic to actually try to force the British leadership to think of something better?

Since when did the British "surrender" so easily?
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

And you're an idiot if you think the EU will just stick with that one deal. Did it ever occur to you that this could be a tactic to actually try to force the British leadership to think of something better?
Since when did the British "surrender" so easily?


Yorktown

Singapore

Khyber Pass
 
Hoid
#20
New Orleans
 
Hoid
#21
Yorktown
 
Hoid
#22
Singapore
 
Cliffy
Free Thinker
+1
#23
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bjghJ6Dy6Do


Boris Suspends Democracy




Jonathan Pie - No matter which way you voted, our democracy is looking pretty shitty right now.
 
Blackleaf
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

And you're an idiot if you think the EU will just stick with that one deal.

The only way they'll accept a new deal is if Boris outwits them and terrifies them and forces them into a new deal.

Although the EU has just said again today that it will not remove the Irish backstop from May's deal, which is what Boris wants to happen, so it's not even willing to change and make better May's pathetic deal, so what chance is there of it negotiating a new deal entirely?

So I'm not being an idiotic in thinking that it's looking certain that the EU wants to stick with May's deal. And why wouldn't it? May's deal is pathetic, and is Brexit only in name.
 
Blackleaf
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bjghJ6Dy6Do


Boris Suspends Democracy




Jonathan Pie - No matter which way you voted, our democracy is looking pretty shitty right now.

Do Jonathan Pie and you get every angry year when Parliament is prorogued and there's a State Opening of Parliament or is it just this occasion when Boris, rather than suspending democracy, is trying to help save democracy by giving Remainers less time to overturn it? That's what's really got your goat up, isn't it? You're angry that Boris has outwitted the anti-democratic Remainers by coming up with a ruse to carry out the democratic decision made by the British people. You don't like that. And, like the Remainers, you're calling Boris's decision to save democracy from the anti-democratic Remainers "undemocratic"!
 
Blackleaf
#26
Letters to the Editor

The Telegraph
1 September 2019



SIR – Remainers increasingly speak of stopping a no-deal Brexit. But this is really just a smoke screen to conceal their determination to stop any deal and keep Britain in the EU.

Three times Parliament rejected Theresa May’s deal, yet Remainers have never come forward with a deal that they or the EU would support, and they show no signs of doing so.

This duplicitous behaviour has now resulted in the Prime Minister taking decisive action to honour the referendum result, something that Remainers will never accept.

Brian Higgins

Eastbourne, East Sussex

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/...hnson-seeking/
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The only way they'll accept a new deal is if Boris outwits them and terrifies them and forces them into a new deal.


Which is called diplomacy, the art of outwitting, terrifying and forcing your 'enemy' country to do shit they don't want to do.


BoJo sucks at it so far.


Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Although the EU has just said again today that it will not remove the Irish backstop from May's deal, which is what Boris wants to happen, so it's not even willing to change and make better May's pathetic deal, so what chance is there of it negotiating a new deal entirely?


Why should they try to change things when BoJo has outright proven he won't work with the EU anyway? New leader, new opportunities to change things, or that's how it's supposed to be, except under BoJo. Why bother wasting their time at this point? He's moved his chess piece without even starting the game.


Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

So I'm not being an idiotic in thinking that it's looking certain that the EU wants to stick with May's deal. And why wouldn't it? May's deal is pathetic, and is Brexit only in name.


You are being an idiot.


You honestly thing the EU wins in any way if Brexit happens with a no deal? They would be better off with a deal with Britain. Having a no deal causes a LOT of headaches not just for the UK but the EU too.



But you're too blinded to really give a shit about the EU anyway, so if things are hard on them, tough, right?

Thought so.
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Do Jonathan Pie and you get every angry year when Parliament is prorogued and there's a State Opening of Parliament or is it just this occasion when Boris, rather than suspending democracy, is trying to help save democracy by giving Remainers less time to overturn it? That's what's really got your goat up, isn't it? You're angry that Boris has outwitted the anti-democratic Remainers by coming up with a ruse to carry out the democratic decision made by the British people. You don't like that. And, like the Remainers, you're calling Boris's decision to save democracy from the anti-democratic Remainers "undemocratic"!


Still haven't proven your treasonous claim that Remainers are trying to overthrow the government from a secret location.


And do you even watch Pie? He was against Brexit, now he's all for just getting it ****ing over with.

You should really watch the video, it's likely how a lot of people are thinking right now.
 
Blackleaf
#29
Jacob Rees-Mogg DARES Remainers to try and bring down Boris Johnson next week and accuses them of being 'scared' of an election as new poll shows PM would win 28 seat majority



Jacob Rees-Mogg has accused 'deceitful' MPs planning a last-ditch Commons move to block No Deal Brexit of being too frightened to call a vote of no confidence in Boris Johnson.
 
Blackleaf
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

Still haven't proven your treasonous claim that Remainers are trying to overthrow the government from a secret location.

It's not me that's treasonous. It's the Remainers who are treasonous.


Quote:

And do you even watch Pie? He was against Brexit, now he's all for just getting it ****ing over with.

And yet he's against Boris's prorogation of parliament which has come about in order to stop anti-democratic Remainers overturning Breexit.
 

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