CRTC: Wireless companies must be able to send emergency alerts


spaminator
#1
CRTC: Wireless companies must be able to send emergency alerts
Rob Drinkwater, THE CANADIAN PRESS
First posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 01:29 PM EDT | Updated: Sunday, May 14, 2017 01:34 PM EDT
Canada’s telecom regulator says all wireless service providers must be able to send emergency alerts to customers’ cellphones, and has set a deadline for it to happen.
The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission has ordered that by April, 6, 2018, everyone on an LTE network must be able to receive the same public alerts now broadcast on radio and TV.
The types of events for alerts include natural disasters like fires or floods, or Amber Alerts about abducted children.
“We know that more and more Canadians rely mostly on their cellphones. You carry your cellphone, not necessarily your TV or even your radio,” CRTC spokeswoman Patricia Valladao said in an interview.
In Alberta, many cellphone customers in Fort McMurray received alerts from the province’s emergency management agency when the city was evacuated due to the massive wildfire in 2015.
But the wireless alerts weren’t mandatory — customers either downloaded an app on their phones, or registered with the provincial agency to receive emergency texts.
Valladao said the mandatory alerts will have a special tone and vibration so that people will know it’s not just an ordinary email or text. A banner, in English and French, will appear on the screen stating that there is an alert and that details of the alert will follow.
Messages will only be sent to your phone if you are in the affected area. And, Valladao said, the system will work if you are roaming. That means if you live in Toronto and are spending you holiday at a cottage in Alberta where a tornado warning has just been issued, the message will reach your phone.
A date for the launch of the service will be announced once the wireless industry has met all the necessary standards, the CRTC says.
The commission’s decision follows a consultation that began with the wireless industry in 2016, as well as a trial period in Durham, Ont.
“We are fully in support of anything that uses the power of wireless technology for good,” said Sophie Paluk, spokesperson for Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association.
“We think that it’s an incomparable safety tool for all involved, from first responders to the public. So we’re very supportive of the initiative.”
According to the CRTC, the year-long delay before the service becomes mandatory will allow carriers time to overcome technical challenges to connect with government alert systems. It will also allow time for a public education campaign so people know what’s going on when an alert is issued and their phones start buzzing.
Satellite wireless services, which serve Canada’s north, will be exempt from carrying the mandatory alerts since the messages cannot be geographically targeted within the satellite beam’s large footprints.
Some older phones may require a software upgrade, Valladao said.
In its policy decision posted online, the CRTC noted that many emergency management organizations wanted mandatory alerts on all cellular systems, not just LTE. But the agency said approximately 97.4 per cent of the Canadian population had access to an LTE network in 2016, and wireless providers told them that getting a system to work on all its pre-LTE networks would add time and cost.
Opting out of the alerts will not be possible, according to the policy decision.
A spokeswoman for Alberta’s minister of municipal affairs, which is the department responsible for emergency management, said it’s difficult to know whether mandatory alerts would have affected the Fort McMurray evacuation. But she says any improvement in communication is a plus.
“We are committed to ongoing improvement and enhancement of our provincial alerting system and support the decision of the CRTC as a means to reach Albertans directly during an emergency,” Melinda Steenbergen said in an email.
CRTC: Wireless companies must be able to send emergency alerts | Canada | News |
 
taxslave
#2
Just wait until we get "alerts" that rotten Ronnie's has a special on sawdust burgers.
 
B00Mer
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Just wait until we get "alerts" that rotten Ronnie's has a special on sawdust burgers.

I already get that every Tuesday.. Freebies for being a T-Mobile Customer..

https://www.t-mobile.com/offers/t-mobile-tuesdays
 
JamesBondo
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

CRTC: Wireless companies must be able to send emergency alerts
Rob Drinkwater, THE CANADIAN PRESS
First posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 01:29 PM EDT | Updated: Sunday, May 14, 2017 01:34 PM EDT
Canada’s telecom regulator says all wireless service providers must be able to send emergency alerts to customers’ cellphones, and has set a deadline for it to happen.
The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission has ordered that by April, 6, 2018, everyone on an LTE network must be able to receive the same public alerts now broadcast on radio and TV.
The types of events for alerts include natural disasters like fires or floods, or Amber Alerts about abducted children.
“We know that more and more Canadians rely mostly on their cellphones. You carry your cellphone, not necessarily your TV or even your radio,” CRTC spokeswoman Patricia Valladao said in an interview.
In Alberta, many cellphone customers in Fort McMurray received alerts from the province’s emergency management agency when the city was evacuated due to the massive wildfire in 2015.
But the wireless alerts weren’t mandatory — customers either downloaded an app on their phones, or registered with the provincial agency to receive emergency texts.
Valladao said the mandatory alerts will have a special tone and vibration so that people will know it’s not just an ordinary email or text. A banner, in English and French, will appear on the screen stating that there is an alert and that details of the alert will follow.
Messages will only be sent to your phone if you are in the affected area. And, Valladao said, the system will work if you are roaming. That means if you live in Toronto and are spending you holiday at a cottage in Alberta where a tornado warning has just been issued, the message will reach your phone.
A date for the launch of the service will be announced once the wireless industry has met all the necessary standards, the CRTC says.
The commission’s decision follows a consultation that began with the wireless industry in 2016, as well as a trial period in Durham, Ont.
“We are fully in support of anything that uses the power of wireless technology for good,” said Sophie Paluk, spokesperson for Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association.
“We think that it’s an incomparable safety tool for all involved, from first responders to the public. So we’re very supportive of the initiative.”
According to the CRTC, the year-long delay before the service becomes mandatory will allow carriers time to overcome technical challenges to connect with government alert systems. It will also allow time for a public education campaign so people know what’s going on when an alert is issued and their phones start buzzing.
Satellite wireless services, which serve Canada’s north, will be exempt from carrying the mandatory alerts since the messages cannot be geographically targeted within the satellite beam’s large footprints.
Some older phones may require a software upgrade, Valladao said.
In its policy decision posted online, the CRTC noted that many emergency management organizations wanted mandatory alerts on all cellular systems, not just LTE. But the agency said approximately 97.4 per cent of the Canadian population had access to an LTE network in 2016, and wireless providers told them that getting a system to work on all its pre-LTE networks would add time and cost.
Opting out of the alerts will not be possible, according to the policy decision.
A spokeswoman for Alberta’s minister of municipal affairs, which is the department responsible for emergency management, said it’s difficult to know whether mandatory alerts would have affected the Fort McMurray evacuation. But she says any improvement in communication is a plus.
“We are committed to ongoing improvement and enhancement of our provincial alerting system and support the decision of the CRTC as a means to reach Albertans directly during an emergency,” Melinda Steenbergen said in an email.
CRTC: Wireless companies must be able to send emergency alerts | Canada | News |

It is about F@cking Time!

If there is a chemical spill 5 kms away, the radio and TV won't reach me.

My only option was to download the weathernetwork app for my phone, then enable the 'emergency alerts' feature. This works, but i had to tolerate spam from weather journalists in other provinces. Grrrrr.
 
JamesBondo
#5
gonna bump this. has anyone seen progress on this yet?

last night i tried to search for more informaton about emergency alerts on my new cellphone. all i could find was the old news releases from 2 years ago.

as far as i can tell, my new phone does not have this feature yet.
 
Murphy
+1
#6  Top Rated Post
Mine doesn't.

The weather channel broadcasts this, but that isn't much help if you aren't at home.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#7
If this was a text, I would be ok with it. I don't want this plastered on my iPhone every 10 mins. What gets put on the radio is tornado warnings in a region north of me and not a concern for me. Also I already get texts for amber alerts. Don't want those disrupting my phone useage by big banners.
 
Murphy
#8
Not sure. I would be good with texts as well. The notification sound should be unique though.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Murphy View Post

Not sure. I would be good with texts as well. The notification sound should be unique though.

I can set that on my iPhone right now. Even make custom vibration patterns.
 
Murphy
#10
I have an android. I imagine something similar can be set up.
 
Curious Cdn
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Murphy View Post

I have an android. I imagine something similar can be set up.

Android devices are far more versatile than Apples and you can be sure of it.
 
JamesBondo
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

If this was a text, I would be ok with it. I don't want this plastered on my iPhone every 10 mins. What gets put on the radio is tornado warnings in a region north of me and not a concern for me. Also I already get texts for amber alerts. Don't want those disrupting my phone useage by big banners.

got a question about the amber alerts. are these pushed onto your phone or do you subscribe to something for it?if its the later, please share so i can subscribe too.

i have a tabletop radio that goes off dozens of times per week during the winter while the airport is busy putting out winter storm alerts. I admit that i would not want that to be pushed onto my phone. it would be very annoying.

however, i am in favor of other alerts like amber alert, hazardous materials alert due to train derailment, extreme events that i hope never happen like the halifax explosion.

i dont watch enough tv or listen to enough radio for the old school system to alert me.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by JamesBondo View Post

got a question about the amber alerts. are these pushed onto your phone or do you subscribe to something for it?if its the later, please share so i can subscribe too.

Wireless AMBER Alerts Canada

You choose the provinces you want.

Quote: Originally Posted by JamesBondo View Post

got a question about the amber alerts. are these pushed onto your phone or do you subscribe to something for it?if its the later, please share so i can subscribe too.

i have a tabletop radio that goes off dozens of times per week during the winter while the airport is busy putting out winter storm alerts. I admit that i would not want that to be pushed onto my phone. it would be very annoying.

however, i am in favor of other alerts like amber alert, hazardous materials alert due to train derailment, extreme events that i hope never happen like the halifax explosion.

i dont watch enough tv or listen to enough radio for the old school system to alert me.

I have no issue if they are texts. Other forms of pushing could be disruptive. If they completely take over your screen like they do for weather alerts in Buffalo, that would be unacceptable.
 
JamesBondo
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

Wireless AMBER Alerts Canada

You choose the provinces you want.



I have no issue if they are texts. Other forms of pushing could be disruptive. If they completely take over your screen like they do for weather alerts in Buffalo, that would be unacceptable.

thank you. if i could buy you a drink i would. merry christmas.

-------------------
side note
i got to wonder if an alert would be sent out if a train derailed 10 miles up wind from me. i have an uneasy feeling that the information would be witheld.
 
taxslave
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Murphy View Post

Mine doesn't.

The weather channel broadcasts this, but that isn't much help if you aren't at home.

NOt only that but you would have to be glued to the idiot box with the weather channel on for it to be useful.

Quote: Originally Posted by JamesBondo View Post

thank you. if i could buy you a drink i would. merry christmas.

-------------------
side note
i got to wonder if an alert would be sent out if a train derailed 10 miles up wind from me. i have an uneasy feeling that the information would be witheld.

If a train came within 10 miles of my place I would be very worried.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by JamesBondo View Post

thank you. if i could buy you a drink i would. merry christmas.

-------------------
side note
i got to wonder if an alert would be sent out if a train derailed 10 miles up wind from me. i have an uneasy feeling that the information would be witheld.

It would only appear if it was 10 miles down wind.

Merry Christmas to you too.
 
spaminator
#17
NO OPTING OUT: Canadians to get emergency alerts on their phones soon
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
March 21, 2018
Updated:
March 21, 2018 8:38 AM EDT
TORONTO — Canada’s wireless providers are preparing for a looming update to the National Public Alerting System that will force smartphones to sound an ominous alarm when an emergency alert is triggered.
In case of emergencies including Amber Alerts, forest fires, natural disasters, terrorist attacks or severe weather, officials will be able to send a localized alert that will compel compatible phones on an LTE network to emit an alarm — the same shrill beeping that accompanies TV and radio emergency alerts — and display a bilingual text warning.
The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission gave wireless providers a year to implement the system with a deadline of April 6 to be ready to go live. A report by the CRTC said most wireless providers were in favour of an opt-out option or the ability to disable the alarm for some types of alerts, but consumers can’t turn off the warnings.
“People cannot opt out of this,” said CRTC spokeswoman Patricia Valladao. “There is a high importance that people — want it or not — receive these alerts.”
If a smartphone is turned off it cannot be forced on by an alert. Similarly, if a smartphone is muted an alert cannot force the device to play the alarm. While a broad range of popular phones are compatible with the program, wireless providers have released different lists of phones that will receive the alerts on their networks. Consumers can look up their phone and more information on the program at alertready.ca.
Patrick Tanguy, an assistant deputy minister with Public Safety Canada, said while it was ultimately the CRTC’s decision to keep consumers from having the option of opting out, he defended that call.
“When you’re getting those alerts your life is at risk,” Tanguy said. “So it’s not there’s potentially a danger, there is a danger.”
Similar alerting systems are already in place in other countries including the U.S., where a false alarm in Hawaii about a supposed missile attack made global headlines in January.
New Zealand rolled out a similar system in November but a month earlier had a little snafu. A startling test alert was accidentally sent out at 1:30 a.m., which prompted many to seek ways to opt-out of the system.
There was similar grumbling in New York in 2013 when an alert about a missing child was issued at 3:51 a.m., prompting a debate about whether people should be roused from their sleep in such instances.
Saskatchewan’s provincial emergency public alerting program also had a bit of a hiccup in January when users of the optional SaskAlert app got false warnings about a flood and a wildfire. Officials later said some staff were training on the system and sent the alerts out by mistake.
Tanguy admitted the new federal system “is not 100 per cent bulletproof” but said officials from the various levels of government have been working on researching best practices and training “to make sure those events don’t happen like it happened in Hawaii.”
The mobile alert system is administered by Pelmorex Corp., the parent company of the Weather Network, which will be sending out test alerts in early May to get consumers used to the program.
“People should hopefully be familiar with that sound by the time they get an actual emergency message,” said Paul Temple, senior vice-president of regulatory and strategic affairs at Pelmorex.
“Nowadays pretty well everyone has a phone and you’re not necessarily listening to the radio or watching TV, so it’s just another way to reach people quickly when their life is possibly in danger.”
The CRTC has said wireless providers cannot charge a separate fee on consumers’ bills for participating in the mobile alerting system.
http://alertready.ca
NO OPTING OUT: Canadians to get emergency alerts on their phones soon | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#18
Don't panic! Canada to test new 'Alert Ready' national emergency warning system next week
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
April 30, 2018
Updated:
April 30, 2018 1:01 PM EDT
Apps are shown on an iPhone in Toronto on Monday, March 19, 2018.Graeme Roy / THE CANADIAN PRESS
OTTAWA — Millions of cellphones, tablets and other portable devices will sound off across the country next week to test Canada’s new public emergency alert system.
The country’s broadcast and telecom regulator says the tests will be carried out next Monday in Ontario and Quebec and on Wednesday in the rest of the country.
Test signals will go to every mobile device connected to an LTE network and will also be aired on TV and radio stations in the same regions.
All wireless service providers were required to distribute emergency messages as of April 6 under the national warning system known as Alert Ready.
The signals are controlled by emergency management officials to warn the public of imminent threats, such as tornadoes, floods and fires, as well as water contaminations and Amber alerts.
Depending on the service provider, the alerts could make a distinctive noise or simply buzz a device, although in some cases, users will have to acknowledge receipt of the alert before being able to resume normal function of their devices.
Radio and television stations will air an audible squealing siren sound, along with an emergency test message.
The mandatory tests are being conducted as part of national Emergency Preparedness Week, which begins May 6.
Alert Ready | Introducing Alert Ready, Canada's New Emergency Alert System
Don’t panic! Canada to test new ‘Alert Ready’ national emergency warning system next week | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#19
Mobile devices with LTE service will sound emergency test signal
Canadian Press
Published:
May 7, 2018
Updated:
May 7, 2018 8:57 AM EDT
Tom Sampson, Chief of the Calgary Emergency Management Agency, poses with a cell phone, the City will be using mobile devices to notify citizens of emergency situations. Al Charest/PostmediaAL Charest / Al Charest/Postmedia
OTTAWA — Mobile devices across Canada will be buzzing a little more than usual this week as emergency management officials test a new national public alert system.
Test signals are to be sent to millions of mobile users in Quebec around mid-morning today and across Ontario in mid-afternoon.
Cellphones, tablets and other devices will receive the signal in most of the rest of the country on Wednesday.
Depending on settings, users with compatible devices connected to an LTE network will hear a tone similar to an ambulance alarm or feel a vibration for eight seconds. Devices that are turned off won’t receive the signal but phone users will hear their conversations interrupted by a sound similar to a call waiting tone.
The tests are being conducted after the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission ordered wireless providers to implement the system to distribute warnings of imminent safety threats such as tornadoes, floods, Amber Alerts or terrorist threats.
Radio and TV stations will also run the tests.
A similar system is already used in the U.S., and made headlines earlier this year when an emergency official in Hawaii mistakenly sent an alert about a potential incoming ballistic missile.
A report issued last month by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission said the false alarm, which went uncorrected for 38 minutes after being transmitted and caused widespread panic across the Pacific islands state, was a result of human error and inadequate safeguards.
“The CRTC has no insights with respect to what occurred in Hawaii, other than what has been reported in the media,” the regulator said.
“But Canada has safeguards in place” to prevent false signals from being distributed to mobile devices, said CRTC spokeswoman Patricia Valladao.
Unlike wireless emergency alerts issued in the U.S., Canada’s system requires a specific vibration cadence, alert tone and banner to notify users of an emergency.
As well, the emergency alerts are not text, or SMS, messages, but are distributed using what’s known as cell broadcast technology. The messages can’t be tracked by service providers so they can’t tell who has or has not received the alert, the CRTC said.
Some Canadian service providers sent text messages to subscribers last week alerting them to the tests, which are mandatory and may require users to acknowledge a message before they can resume normal use of their devices.
Here are the scheduled times for the tests. All times are local:
Monday
Quebec 9:55 AM
Ontario 1:55 PM
Wednesday
Yukon 1:30 PM
Northwest Territories 1:55 PM
Alberta 1:55 PM
British-Colombia 1:55 PM
Saskatchewan 1:55 PM
Manitoba 1:55 PM
Newfoundland and Labrador 1:55 PM
Nova Scotia 1:55 PM
Prince Edward Island 1:55 PM
New-Brunswick 6:55 PM
Mobile devices with LTE service will sound emergency test signal | Toronto Sun
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#20
I remained alert free on my phone.
 
DaSleeper
+1
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

I remained alert free on my phone.

I wonder if IPhones with the "don't bother me I'm driving" feature will get the alert while driving?
 
spaminator
#22
Emergency system fails first test in Quebec, hit and miss in Ontario
Canadian Press
Published:
May 7, 2018
Updated:
May 7, 2018 4:31 PM EDT
A text message from Telus is seen on a smart phone in Toronto on Friday, May 4, 2018. Mobile devices across Canada will be buzzing a little more than usual this week as emergency management officials test the new nationwide public alerting system. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy
A glitch in the new national public alert system for mobile devices affected the entire province of Quebec on Monday, said a CRTC spokeswoman, while in Ontario the test warning messages appeared to be hit and miss.
Shortly after the test was scheduled to reach mobile devices in Ontario, at 1:55 p.m. ET, social media was flooded with messages from people confirming they had received the signal, others who had not and still others who appeared startled or even surprised by it.
“I forgot that we were getting that emergency alert testing on our phones,” wrote one Twitter user, going only by Mary.
“But I got forcibly reminded, all right. And there is not enough hot chocolate in the world to calm me down right now.”
Another Twitter user, Brent Morris, wrote that some people at his office got the alert on their phones, but he didn’t.
“I guess if the world ends, I’m the last to know,” he quipped.
For those who did receive it the message read, in part, “This is a test of Ontario’s Alert Ready System. There is no danger to your health or safety.”
In Quebec, where the test did not go as planned shortly before 10 a.m., the problem did not originate with cellphone service providers but appears to have occurred between emergency management in the province and Pelmorex Corp., which operates the system, said the CRTC’s Patricia Valladao.
“The alerts are actually coming from the emergency management in the region and then it goes to Pelmorex,” Valladao said.
In an email to The Canadian Press, Pelmorex issued a statement explaining what happened.
“A space incorrectly included in the coding prevented the Alert Ready System from sending the Quebec test message to compatible wireless devices earlier this morning,” it read, adding the misconfiguration was quickly corrected.
The statement also pointed out the Quebec test “did broadcast successfully on TV and radio.”
In Ontario, the test alerts were also expected to be broadcast across TV and radio airwaves, but in some cases no messages were seen on TV screens.
Valladao pointed out at least it was just a test and not a real emergency. “That’s why they were running tests — to see if something went wrong.”
Depending on settings, users with compatible devices connected to an LTE network were expected to hear a tone similar to an ambulance siren or feel a vibration for eight seconds. Devices that were turned off would not receive the signal but phone users receiving the alerts would have heard their conversations interrupted by a sound similar to a call-waiting tone.
The tests were being conducted after the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission ordered wireless providers to implement the system to distribute warnings of imminent safety threats, such as tornadoes, floods, Amber Alerts or terrorist threats.
A similar system is already used in the United States and made headlines earlier this year when an emergency official in Hawaii mistakenly sent an alert about a potential incoming ballistic missile.
A report issued last month by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission said the false alarm, which went uncorrected for 38 minutes after being transmitted and caused widespread panic across the Pacific islands state, was a result of human error and inadequate safeguards.
“The CRTC has no insights with respect to what occurred in Hawaii, other than what has been reported in the media,” the regulator said.
But it added that Canada has safeguards in place to prevent false signals from being distributed to mobile devices.
Unlike wireless emergency alerts issued in the United States, Canada’s system requires a specific vibration cadence, alert tone and banner to notify users of an emergency.
As well, the emergency alerts are not text — or SMS — messages, but are distributed using what’s known as cell broadcast technology. The messages can’t be tracked by service providers so they can’t tell who has or has not received the alert, the CRTC said.
Here are the scheduled times for tests scheduled for later this week outside Ontario and Quebec. All times are local:
Wednesday:
Yukon 1:30 p.m.
Northwest Territories 1:55 p.m.
Alberta 1:55 p.m.
British-Columbia 1:55 p.m.
Saskatchewan 1:55 p.m.
Manitoba 1:55 p.m.
Newfoundland and Labrador 1:55 p.m.
Nova Scotia 1:55 p.m.
Prince Edward Island 1:55 p.m.
New-Brunswick 6:55 p.m.

Emergency system fails first test in Quebec, hit and miss in Ontario | Toronto Sun
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

I wonder if IPhones with the "don't bother me I'm driving" feature will get the alert while driving?

I don't have iOS11. I am still on 10 since I still like my 16 bit apps.

My wife is on iOS11 and she also did not get the alert.
 
DaSleeper
#24
I think you meant 32 to 64 bit system...
I had a 32 bit app that didn't get updated to 64 bit before the software update...
It still works on my phone now..
But when I tried to download a copy to my Ipad, I can't even find it in the app store.....
 
spaminator
#25
New emergency alert system plagued by glitches in Western Canada | Toronto Sun
 
taxslave
#26
Fail in BC. Typical of anything run by government. Didn't get any message and some radio stations didn't get the message either.
 
captain morgan
+1
#27
3 of us in the same office compared notes, 1 person got a text (no audible alert) and 2 of us nothing.


Big fail here to
 
DaSleeper
#28
I'm with Bell but Haven't got anything yet...
Their alerts on satellite Express-view sure work but are a pain in the butt!!!
 
Decapoda
#29
I got the alert on my work cell phone but not my personal. Both cells on the same network, both current devices.

Pelmorex has released a media response saying it's the fault of people's devices. They say you must be on LTE network and your device must have the newest OS version. Both my phones check the boxes, so not sure how they explain that. I heard that some people with old flip phones got the alert, not sure what OS they were running.
 
DaSleeper
+1
#30
I guess that Bell didn't need to test their system on phones......
I just received an amber alert on my phone while I was walking, half an hour ago and when I got home the tv ( Bell Express-vu) had switched by itself to the alert channel