Brexiteer Andrea Leadsom: "It's time to get rid of the Speaker"


Blackleaf
#1
Leading Brexiteer and Business Secretary Andrea Leadsom says it's time to get rid of the disgracefully unimpartial Remainer Speaker of the Commons John Bercow, the Poison Dwarf...

His abuse of the rules flagrantly defied the will of the people: ANDREA LEADSOM on Commons Speaker John Bercow 'failing' the Government


Business Secretary Andrea Leadsom in war of words with John Bercow

She blames the Speaker of 'handing over power to the Opposition'

Mrs Leadsom has called on someone 'impartial' to take over the Speaker role


By Andrea Leadsom, Business Secretary and Brexiteer
8 September 2019
Mail on Sunday

People who choose to go into politics do so to make the world a better place – I know that was certainly my aspiration.

That might sound naive – and after the last week, it might sound implausible – but it’s the truth.

And in my role as Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, I feel I have the opportunity to do that – to cut our carbon emissions; to make the most of the fourth industrial revolution; to make our working environment better, and to use science to cure disease, to extend life and to improve communities.


Destroyed: The Government’s negotiating hand in Brussels has been hampered, as the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Andrea Leadsom says


These are all real goals that have real impacts on real people.

And, of course, I have another important goal too – to see us leave the EU, fulfil the will of the British people, and become a truly free, international-facing nation.

Last week was one of those weeks in politics where late nights met frustration and disappointment. In just a few short days, Jeremy Corbyn and a select group of MPs demonstrated their refusal to respect democracy and act on the will of the people.

A will that our Prime Minister has fought all summer to deliver.

As the former Leader of the Commons, I spent two years watching Parliament chip away at our negotiating hand. It was a role that gave me a unique and privileged insight into the mechanics of our political system – which is intricate, but has been forged over the centuries.

In the absence of a single written constitution, we follow a mix of precedent, convention and law. But that unwritten constitution still has rules, and it has people at its heart.

The people exercise their will through Parliament – a group of MPs, selected by them, to represent them and govern them. In return for power, MPs agree to respect the voice of the people. But last week, the House failed to do so.

By voting to extend Article 50 in the absence of a deal, the Opposition have destroyed the Government’s negotiating hand in Brussels – giving little incentive for the EU to give us the good deal we continue to fight for, and taking away the Prime Minister’s room to fight for the UK’s interests.

But, even more than this, they have changed the UK constitution.

There are people in Parliament whose roles are to understand the British constitution, and to protect it. One of those is the Leader of the Commons, working in the ‘engine room’ of the legislative machine. Another is the Speaker.

The Speaker is the senior officer of the House of Commons, and its highest authority. A politically impartial, independent umpire of proceedings, the Speaker is in place to protect the constitution and oversee the behaviour of the House.

As an MP, a Minister and a former Leader of the Commons, I fully respect and appreciate the role of the Speaker. But last week, the current Speaker failed us.


Under fire: Speaker John Bercow was criticised by Mrs Leadsom of 'giving power to the Opposition'

In allowing MPs to use Standing Order No 24 – an important procedure whereby MPs can debate urgent issues – as a route to taking over the Parliamentary timetable and giving power to the Opposition, the Speaker hasn’t just bent the rules, he has broken them.

So it is right that the Conservatives will recognise this fact at the next General Election by standing our candidate against him in Buckingham

Parliamentary procedure is centuries old. The process of having a first, second and third reading is a tool to protect the public.

The time-consuming procedure ensures that each piece of legislation – which changes the laws of the country and in turn, people’s lives – is done in a very considered way, avoiding mistakes and maintaining the integrity of the Commons.

What we saw on Tuesday was a flagrant abuse of this process.

The Standing Order No 24 that the Opposition proposed wasn’t appropriate for a Motion.

It was intended to ram through legislation for purely political motives.

The use of Standing Order No 24 in this way will lead to the creation of bad laws.

It ignores the Government’s right to govern, abuses emergency debates and in this case has put EU negotiations into the hands of the Opposition.

It acts in complete disregard to the will of the people – not just on Brexit, but on whom they have chosen to govern them.

It adds insult to injury that in doing so, Labour have afforded themselves power without accountability – claiming to represent the people without asking their permission.

This is a route to the diminution of our democracy, which is why the Prime Minister is now calling for a General Election.

Bring it on, I say, and bring back an impartial Speaker.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/a...democracy.html
 
Hoid
#2
unimpartial?

is that a word?
 
Blackleaf
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

unimpartial?

is that a word?

It is now. I've just coined it. That makes me just like Shakespeare and Wilding.

Shakespeare coined the words "bandit" (Henry VI, Part 2. 1594), "critic" (Love's Labour's Lost. 1598 ), "dauntless" (Henry VI, Part 3. 1616), "dwindle" (Henry IV, Part 1. 1598 ), "lacklustre" (As You Like It. 1616) and "lonely" (Coriolanus. 1616). He coined many others, too.

Peter Wilding coined the word "Brexit". Wilding is the founder and director of the British Influence think tank - and campaigned for the UK to Remain in the referendum.

He wrote about "Brexit" in May 2012, eight months before the then Prime Minister David Cameron had announced he would be holding a referendum.

"Unless a clear view is pushed that Britain must lead in Europe at the very least to achieve the completion of the single market then the portmanteau for Greek euro exit might be followed by another sad word, Brexit," he predicted.

Reflecting on being first to use the term, he says: "I had no idea but got a phonecall a couple of months ago from the Oxford English Dictionary.

"It certainly gives one the moral authority to say what it means."



 
Hoid
#4
how about "partial"
 
Blackleaf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

how about "partial"

I avoided that word because it made him sound like a part-time Speaker; not a full Speaker.

Like a partial lunar eclipse isn't a full lunar eclipse.
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
#6
Odd how in our system of government we can't simple do what is right and get on with it. instead we have to have consultations and referendums. Little wonder our economy is such a mess and China is an economic powerhouse.
 
Blackleaf
+1
#7  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Odd how in our system of government we can't simple do what is right and get on with it. instead we have to have consultations and referendums. Little wonder our economy is such a mess and China is an economic powerhouse.

Well our politicians are supposed to do what their bosses - the people - order them to do.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Well our politicians are supposed to do what their bosses - the people - order them to do.

Ours are too . Unfortunately there is a thing called party discipline that must be adhered to . With the party leader responsible for signing nomination papers all elected members have little choice but follow their parties position .
 
Blackleaf
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Ours are too . Unfortunately there is a thing called party discipline that must be adhered to . With the party leader responsible for signing nomination papers all elected members have little choice but follow their parties position .

Usually MPs do whatever they want - whether abiding by the electoral promises they were elected on or not - unless they are whipped into following the party line when it comes to Commons votes.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Usually MPs do whatever they want - whether abiding by the electoral promises they were elected on or not - unless they are whipped into following the party line when it comes to Commons votes.

Yes free votes are always promised but the party whip works behind the scenes.
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#11
Well the lady in the OP might have a bit more of a case if she wasn't already biased against the speaker.


That said, the opinion in itself was enough to get me into reading up on what happened. Interesting stuff at least.


I'm not sure I agree with what he did in principle, however, I think I understand why he allowed this procedure to be used. Again, interesting stuff.


Though why people wanting to have Brexit with a deal is such a bad thing is beyond me.
 
Blackleaf
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

Well the lady in the OP might have a bit more of a case if she wasn't already biased against the speaker.
That said, the opinion in itself was enough to get me into reading up on what happened. Interesting stuff at least.
I'm not sure I agree with what he did in principle, however, I think I understand why he allowed this procedure to be used. Again, interesting stuff.
Though why people wanting to have Brexit with a deal is such a bad thing is beyond me.


Brexiteer Andrea Leadsom supported the report into the allegations of Remainer Bercow's bullying and harassment and sexual harassment of female staff.


He's also been the worst Speaker in living memory. He's supposed to be impartial and yet keeps showing support for Remainer MPs. He breaks Commons rules to try and stop Brexit and then gets angry when Boris lawfully prorogues Parliament.


He's not called the Poison Dwarf for nothing.


This is yet another great victory for the Brexiteers in Britain's political civil war.