Beijing warns of ‘people’s war’ against U.S.: Chinese consumers now global superpower


Murphy
#1
The Trump administration got the reaction they wanted. The art of the deal is being felt in China now. Everything will smooth itself out, and it sure is fun to watch. The only advantage Trump has is that the Chinese are relatively new at bargaining on a world wide scale.
---

Beijing warns of ‘people’s war’ against U.S.: Chinese consumers now global superpower

As China plots its response to a White House determined to extract blood on trade, Beijing’s leadership knows it cannot match U.S. military or economic might.

But Chinese decision makers also know they now oversee the the world’s dominant marketplace. China’s retail sales are the highest on earth, worth US$7.5-trillion last year, 14-per-cent higher than those in the U.S.

China is No. 1 in cars, smartphones and any number of other items people buy for themselves. Chinese consumers, in other words, have already collectively become the world’s buying superpower.

And when Beijing wants to retaliate, it has a record of using those buyers, nudged by nationalism and propaganda, to exact a painful toll on rivals. China has done so in recent years to the Philippines, Japan and South Korea, with Chinese consumers participating in boycotts of foreign-made cars, cosmetics and tourist destinations that have inflicted financial suffering on those Beijing wants to punish.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/worl...ese-consumers/



Is Beijing spoiling for a trade war?
Discreet talks with the U.S. continue, but many in China say bring it on
Saša Petricic · CBC News

If U.S. officials wanted to provoke a sharp response from China, they got one.

Comments on the internet here burst out Friday with insults and invective, calling U.S. President Donald Trump a "shortsighted bully." They threatened war, and not just the kind over trade, echoing the kind of language being used on the other side of the Pacific.

Trump is proposing tariffs of up to $60 billion on Chinese goods as punishment for what U.S. officials call Beijing's "economic aggression."

"Trump acts like he is a hoodlum when he loses money to China," posted a Chinese internet user named Wind. "Luckily China has a strong military now."

There was plenty of official reaction, too. The trade blast from Washington — and accusations that China is stealing U.S. industrial secrets and abusing American firms — brought blowback from the Chinese ambassador to the U.S.

Americans "should not believe that they have a monopoly over innovation and everybody else is just stealing from them," said Cui Tiankai. "I think this is a kind of discrimination."

Is Beijing spoiling for a trade war? - World - CBC News

What will China do?
Last edited by Murphy; Mar 23rd, 2018 at 05:45 PM..
 
Durry
#2
Seems to me that they should been able to come up with a reasonable compromise, the US can't compete with China on some things and visa versa.

This sounds like a shotgun approach to a problem that has solutions that can be negotiated by resonable men.
 
petros
#3
We are going to war with them within a few years.
 
Curious Cdn
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

We are going to war with them within a few years.

They get quite a bit of food from NA now and if they have a drought year, bad harvest year, they are utterly screwed. Our suffering will consist of paying more for consumer goods, just like we used to.
Last edited by Curious Cdn; Mar 23rd, 2018 at 07:02 PM..
 
Murphy
#5
We already are. An economic one. It's one that we will not win. The dollar store frontal assault does a number of things.

It puts Chinese goods into consumer hands cheaply. So cheap that other manufacturers have difficulty competing.
It bankrupts some of the competition.
It adds value to their currency and brings in a pile of cash which is reinvested internally.
It strengthens their presence on the world stage without having to fire a shot.

No need to kill others when you can subjugate them economically.
 
Durry
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Murphy View Post

We already are. An economic one. It's one that we will not win. The dollar store frontal assault does a number of things.

It puts Chinese goods into consumer hands cheaply. So cheap that other manufacturers have difficulty competing.
It bankrupts some of the competition.
It adds value to their currency and brings in a pile of cash which is reinvested internally.
It strengthens their presence on the world stage without having to fire a shot.

No need to kill others when you can subjugate them economically.

This is why the US should have tried to negotiate with them before these silly duties

This is how China will surpass the US.

https://youtu.be/n7w3La9k-8E
 
White_Unifier
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Murphy View Post

The Trump administration got the reaction they wanted. The art of the deal is being felt in China now. Everything will smooth itself out, and it sure is fun to watch. The only advantage Trump has is that the Chinese are relatively new at bargaining on a world wide scale.
---

Beijing warns of ‘people’s war’ against U.S.: Chinese consumers now global superpower

As China plots its response to a White House determined to extract blood on trade, Beijing’s leadership knows it cannot match U.S. military or economic might.

But Chinese decision makers also know they now oversee the the world’s dominant marketplace. China’s retail sales are the highest on earth, worth US$7.5-trillion last year, 14-per-cent higher than those in the U.S.

China is No. 1 in cars, smartphones and any number of other items people buy for themselves. Chinese consumers, in other words, have already collectively become the world’s buying superpower.

And when Beijing wants to retaliate, it has a record of using those buyers, nudged by nationalism and propaganda, to exact a painful toll on rivals. China has done so in recent years to the Philippines, Japan and South Korea, with Chinese consumers participating in boycotts of foreign-made cars, cosmetics and tourist destinations that have inflicted financial suffering on those Beijing wants to punish.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/worl...ese-consumers/



Is Beijing spoiling for a trade war?
Discreet talks with the U.S. continue, but many in China say bring it on
Saša Petricic · CBC News

If U.S. officials wanted to provoke a sharp response from China, they got one.

Comments on the internet here burst out Friday with insults and invective, calling U.S. President Donald Trump a "shortsighted bully." They threatened war, and not just the kind over trade, echoing the kind of language being used on the other side of the Pacific.

Trump is proposing tariffs of up to $60 billion on Chinese goods as punishment for what U.S. officials call Beijing's "economic aggression."

"Trump acts like he is a hoodlum when he loses money to China," posted a Chinese internet user named Wind. "Luckily China has a strong military now."

There was plenty of official reaction, too. The trade blast from Washington — and accusations that China is stealing U.S. industrial secrets and abusing American firms — brought blowback from the Chinese ambassador to the U.S.

Americans "should not believe that they have a monopoly over innovation and everybody else is just stealing from them," said Cui Tiankai. "I think this is a kind of discrimination."

Is Beijing spoiling for a trade war? - World - CBC News

What will China do?

The Chinese are as stupid as Trump. That's the irony of a trade war. Trump kicks himself in the foot so now China wants to kick itself in the foot to teach America a lesson.
 
Murphy
#8
I'm good with that as long as I get the food concession.
 
White_Unifier
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Murphy View Post

I'm good with that as long as I get the food concession.

We'll see which side can kick itself in the foot the hardest.
 
Murphy
#10
I'm not concerned as long as I get the food concession.
 
Bar Sinister
#11
Possible good news for Canada. If the Chinese decide to cut back on US agricultural goods then they will have to make up the shortfall elsewhere and Canada is in a perfect spot to make up for some of that shortfall.
 
White_Unifier
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Bar Sinister View Post

Possible good news for Canada. If the Chinese decide to cut back on US agricultural goods then they will have to make up the shortfall elsewhere and Canada is in a perfect spot to make up for some of that shortfall.

As long as Canada doesn't kick itself in the feet too.

Canada is in a difficult position right now. For example, if the US started raising tariffs against Canada, the best thing Canada could do is to just take it... unfortunately.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#13  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Bar Sinister View Post

Possible good news for Canada. If the Chinese decide to cut back on US agricultural goods then they will have to make up the shortfall elsewhere and Canada is in a perfect spot to make up for some of that shortfall.

They might just consider us to be a more stable and reliable source into the future, too. The name of the game in the trading world now is to find more stable partners than the US. We are ill advised to have all of our eggs in the one basket as the Americans enter this new phase in their history. We needn't go down with them.
 
White_Unifier
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

They might just consider us to be a more stable and reliable source into the future, too. The name of the game in the trading world now is to find more stable partners than the US. We are ill advised to have all of our eggs in the one basket as the Americans enter this new phase in their history. We needn't go down with them.

I agree. No matter what, we will always benefit from trade with the US; but we must never forget that we can't force the US to trade with us either. Sure the US hurts itself by refusing to trade with us too, but we can't count on it to always act rationally even in its own national interest, and that makes the US very unpredictable.

With that in mind, yes, we need to promote trade with other countries too. That way, should the US be foolish enough to close its doors to us and so hurt both parties in the process, while Canada will still hurt, it will hurt less if we can trade at least with more distant countries.
 

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