Remarkable evidence of ancient humans found under Florida river


spaminator
#1
Remarkable evidence of ancient humans found under Florida river
Will Dunham, Reuters
First posted: Friday, May 13, 2016 03:37 PM EDT | Updated: Friday, May 13, 2016 03:46 PM EDT
WASHINGTON - Researchers who dove hundreds of times into a sinkhole beneath the brown murky waters of Florida's Aucilla River have retrieved some of the oldest evidence of human presence in the Americas including stone tools apparently used to butcher a mastodon.
Scientists said on Friday the tools, animal bones and mastodon tusk found at the site showed that people already had occupied the American Southeast by 14,550 years ago, about 1,500 years earlier than previously known.
The site provided some of the most compelling evidence that humans had spread across the New World earlier than the so-called Clovis people, who archeologists for six decades considered the Americas' first people. The Clovis people, recognized for their distinctive spearheads, are known from archeological evidence about 13,000 years old.
The artifacts painted a picture of human hunter-gatherers butchering or scavenging a mastodon, an extinct elephant cousin, next to a small inland pond. The tusk had cut marks from a tool used to remove it from the skull, perhaps to access edible tissue at its base.
Intrigued by previous archeological finds at the site, the researchers conducted 890 dives into the 35-foot-deep (11-meter) sinkhole in limestone bedrock at the so-called Page-Ladson site near Florida's capital Tallahassee from 2012 to 2014.
They excavated stone tools including a biface, a stone knife useful for butchering animals, and bones of extinct big mammals including camels, bison, horses and mastodons.
Florida State University anthropologist Jessi Halligan, who dove 126 times, said nomadic hunter-gatherers may have followed big prey like mastodons from water hole to water hole. Bones that appear to be from dogs suggest the hunter-gatherers had canine companions with them.
There were no humans in the Americas until people crossed the land bridge that once connected Siberia to Alaska during the Ice Age but the timing of that event remains mysterious.
"The evidence from the Page-Ladson site is a major leap forward in shaping a new view of the peopling of the Americas at the end of the last Ice Age," Texas A&M University archeologist Michael Waters said.
"In the archeological community, there's still a terrific amount of resistance to the idea that people were here before Clovis."
Only a handful of pre-Clovis sites are known in the Americas. There is controversy about the legitimacy of some of them. The Florida site is roughly the same age as one in Chile that is considered the most scientifically accepted pre-Clovis locale.
The research was published in the journal Science Advances.
Reuters photo

Remarkable evidence of ancient humans found under Florida river | World | News |
 
Cliffy
#2
The Bering land bridge theory and Clovis were debunked decades ago. The original site in Asia where Clovis originally came from was dated later than the American Clovis sites and the migrations from Asia came by land and sea along the coast because the water level at the time was 400 feet below what it is today.
 
spaminator
#3
Ancient tools and bone found in Florida could help rewrite the story of the first Americans

SARAH KAPLAN, THE WASHINGTON POST

First posted: Saturday, May 14, 2016 11:41 AM EDT | Updated: Saturday, May 14, 2016 04:12 PM EDT

Thousands of years ago, some of the first Americans knelt beside a pond in what is now Florida. Clutching sharp stone knives, they hacked at the tusk of a slain mastodon, slicing meat away from the long bone. Then, with their work completed, they got up and walked away, leaving behind some tools and the stripped carcass.


Centuries passed. Sea levels rose. The ancient site was submerged by layers of sediment, and then by a rising river. Wave after wave of human inhabitants came and went: hunters, farmers, explorers, colonizers, retirees from New York. Until, in 2012, a team of archaeologists descended into the river's murky depths to dig up the artifacts below.


The ancient tools and bone are 14,550 years old, the archaeologists reported Friday in the journal Science Advances, making them the most ancient human remnants ever found in the southeastern United States. The researchers say the find is unequivocal proof that people were in Florida more than 1,000 years earlier than anyone had imagined - a discovery that could help rewrite the history of humans on the continent.


The new study comes as something of a vindication for the swampy site in the Florida panhandle, named Page-Ladson for the diver who discovered it and the family whose land it is on. In the 1980s, archaeologist James Dunbar and paleontologist David Webb dug up the knife-scarred mastodon tusk that had been left there and estimated it to be more than 14,400 years old.


But the anthropological community was quick to cast doubt on that date. For half a century it had been assumed that the Clovis people - skilled hunters famous for their distinctive fluted spear points - were the first to migrate from Asia and then down through Canada after the glaciers began to melt at the end of the last ice age, roughly 13,000 years ago.


The age given for the tusk didn't fit that paradigm, other scientists said - the ice-free corridor wouldn't even have been open yet. Something must have gone wrong with the dig or the radiocarbon dating, or perhaps the marks on the tusk were caused by something other than a human. Even Dunbar and Webb expressed some misgivings about their results.


"I always felt that Dunbar and Webb had been kind of maligned," said Mike Waters, the director of the Center for the Study of the First Americans at Texas A&M and a principal investigator on the latest Page-Ladson report. "So when I was given the chance to go back there, I jumped at it."


This time, Waters and his colleagues were armed with dating techniques orders of magnitude more precise than their predecessors'. They also had an increasingly compelling case for "pre-Clovis" occupation of the Americas: genetic analyses showing that Native Americans' ancestors arrived here some 16,000 years ago and archaeological sites as far-flung as Oregon and Chile bearing evidence of human presence long before Clovis.


"What we tried to do at Page-Ladson is make a really strong case that would be unassailable ... that these artifacts are man-made and they're exactly where those people left them 14,550 years ago," Waters said.


The project involved years of painstaking excavation in the Aucilla River, a slow-moving, coffee-colored waterway shaded by cypress trees and inhabited by alligators. Underwater archaeologists dug up and dated layer after layer of sediment from the river bottom, sifting through each patch of dirt for evidence that humans had once been there.


They uncovered what co-author Tom Stafford calls a "chronological layer cake." More than 70 samples of ancient organic material taken from the site and radiocarbon dated at Stafford's lab showed that each layer was slightly older than the one before it. They prove that nothing had disturbed or mixed up the sediments as they were laid down over time.


By the time archaeologists reached the 14,500-year-old stratum, they began to find objects they say could only have come from humans: five sharpened rocks that were carried in from elsewhere in the region, and a double-sided stone knife, or biface, that would have been among the most advanced technologies of the time. The team then re-examined the mastodon tusk found by Webb and Dunbar (who was also part of this excavation) and determined that it was most likely butchered by humans.


"It's really exciting," said Jessi Halligan, an archaeologist at Florida State University and Waters's fellow principal investigator. "We have these unambiguous cultural artifacts found in an intact geological stratum that dates to more than 1,500 years older than Clovis. That's why it's a big deal. That's why we have to revisit our theory for how the Americas were colonized."


Donald Grayson, an anthropologist at the University of Washington who specializes in American prehistory, noted that there's some doubt about radiocarbon dates coming out of the Aucilla River. Ancient carbon dissolved in the water can contaminate samples, causing them to appear older than they really are.


Halligan countered that the dates coming out of Stafford's lab match what is known about environmental changes at the time. For example, a layer of rapidly deposited dirt was estimated to have been laid down between 14,500 and 14,000 calendar years before present - at exactly the time that rising sea levels would have caused a huge influx of sediment. If the samples were contaminated, that wouldn't be the case.


"These are the most precise ages we can get," she said.


The discovery also jibes with other pre-Clovis archaeological finds across the Americas, including the more than 14,300-year-old Paisley Caves site in south-central Oregon. Dennis Jenkins, an archaeologist for the Museum of Natural and Cultural History at the University of Oregon who co-led excavations of the caves, said that report offered "yet another data point" in favor of an increasingly popular new theory about America's first humans.


"I believe that the majority of professional archaeologists have reached a point that, yes, they agree there was something here a minimum of 1000 years before Clovis ... and since the ice free corridor wasn't open yet, obviously there are a lot implications for getting people down from the interior of Alaska," Jenkins said.


It seems likely that the first Americans sailed down the Pacific coast, where pockets of land and seal-rich seas would have sustained them as they migrated south to places like Paisley Caves and Monte Verde in Chile. From there, they may have followed America's river systems to the other side of the continent, or trekked across Central America at its narrowest point and sailed up into the Gulf of Mexico.


The Page-Ladson find also challenges another piece of anthropology orthodoxy: Scientists have long-believed that the arrival of human hunters in the Americas precipitated a "blitzkrieg" extinction of the region's megafauna - mammoths, giant bison, ground sloths, and others - because Clovis points appear at exactly the moment in the archaeological record where giant mammal fossils vanish. But the discovery of tools and a butchered mastodon bone suggest that humans and these large animals co-existed for at least 1,500 years.


So, how did the Page-Ladson people get to Florida? And what happened when they arrived?


"We just don't know yet," Waters said. "But what we do know now is that there were people at Page-Ladson 14,550 years ago ... and I'm hoping that it will blow the fence sitters off on to the pre-Clovis side and maybe it will open the eyes of the Clovis First proponents."


"And then," he added, "we can start looking for answers to all those other questions."

Jessi Halligan, left, and fellow researchers hold the partially reassembled mastodon tusk from the Page-Ladson site. (Brendan Fenerty/HANDOUT)



Ancient tools and bone found in Florida could help rewrite the story of the firs
 
Curious Cdn
#4
Sleeepin' wit da fishes ...
 
EagleSmack
+2
#5  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

The Bering land bridge theory and Clovis were debunked decades ago.

False.
 
bill barilko
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

False.

Quite true in fact you've just been out of touch for eons.
 
darkbeaver
#7
Nothing can be reliably dated unless it has a serial number.
 
EagleSmack
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilko View Post

Quite true in fact you've just been out of touch for eons.

No it is false. You just can't let tribal politics and pride get in the way of archeology.

Go clean your tackle box.
 
bill barilko
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

No it is false. You just can't let tribal politics and pride get in the way of archeology.

Appalling ignorance noted-as per SOP
 
EagleSmack
#10
Oh dear... the hapless one thinks the peopling of the Americas was just one event.

lmao... go brush the barnacles off your hull.
 
Ludlow
+1
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

Oh dear... the hapless one thinks the peopling of the Americas was just one event.

lmao... go brush the barnacles off your hull.

lotta hate in that post
 
bill barilko
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Ludlow View Post

lotta hate in that post

Ignorance too-as per his SOP.
 
EagleSmack
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilko View Post

Ignorance too-as per his SOP.

Go home and get your tackle box!



All bent out of shape because they came across the Bering Land Bridge.
 
darkbeaver
#14
They came in big ships from Russia, big ships from China unt big ships from Egypt and they came in small ships from everywhere else. There never was a new world there never was a dark age.
 
EagleSmack
#15
Hail Atlantis!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrMQHisqwok
 
darkbeaver
#16
Bombing them into the Stone Age



Louis Hissink's Crazy World

Posted on April 5, 2016by Louis Hissink
Gunnar Heinsohn has discovered from the paucity of stratigraphical evidence that approximately 700 years seem to be missing from the First Millenium of this era, the Middle Dark Ages. It is a controversial hypothesis and the question arises where are the missing strata? An approximate date of about 935 CE is assigned to the end of the phantom years that started ~235 CE.
Heinsohn has pointed out the existence of Roman artifacts in anachronistic strata such as the Neolithic, which is conventionally assigned to pre-Bronze era, in Europe etc.
But if an empire decides to threaten a subject nation by bombing it to the stone-age, then surely that would also happen today if some global catastrophe occurred, like an encounter with a cosmic body via the electrical plasma medium, a Velikovsky type event, or a magnitude greater Carrington Event which would destroy all the electrical power plants, cause mass extermination of much life at the surface, and cause the survivors to eke out an existence without their iphones and other mod cons. They would literally be sent to the stone age. This seems to be what happened to some parts of the Roman Empire during the first millennium.
So I think a possible solution for the phantom missing years Gunnar Heinsohn identified is to shift the Neolithic Period to between 235CE and 935CE.
This revisionism will cause apoplexy, I suspect.
 
Curious Cdn
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

Bombing them into the Stone Age



Louis Hissink's Crazy World

Posted on April 5, 2016by Louis Hissink
Gunnar Heinsohn has discovered from the paucity of stratigraphical evidence that approximately 700 years seem to be missing from the First Millenium of this era, the Middle Dark Ages. It is a controversial hypothesis and the question arises where are the missing strata? An approximate date of about 935 CE is assigned to the end of the phantom years that started ~235 CE.
Heinsohn has pointed out the existence of Roman artifacts in anachronistic strata such as the Neolithic, which is conventionally assigned to pre-Bronze era, in Europe etc.
But if an empire decides to threaten a subject nation by bombing it to the stone-age, then surely that would also happen today if some global catastrophe occurred, like an encounter with a cosmic body via the electrical plasma medium, a Velikovsky type event, or a magnitude greater Carrington Event which would destroy all the electrical power plants, cause mass extermination of much life at the surface, and cause the survivors to eke out an existence without their iphones and other mod cons. They would literally be sent to the stone age. This seems to be what happened to some parts of the Roman Empire during the first millennium.
So I think a possible solution for the phantom missing years Gunnar Heinsohn identified is to shift the Neolithic Period to between 235CE and 935CE.
This revisionism will cause apoplexy, I suspect.

The mechanism by which we were bombed back to the Stone Age would survive in some fossil form ... at least, hints of it, anyway.

It's an interesting idea, though. It is the basis of a sci-fi novel that I remember reading in High School called "A Canticle for Leibovitz" It suggests that we bomb ourselves back to ignorance cyclically every 3,000 years, or so
 
darkbeaver
#18
Vitrafied stone all over the place, glass as well, tektites, whole lotta electricity goin on, not to long ago, made us think about the hot violent gods, we remember,

Zzzzzzzzzzaaaaaaapppppppppppppppppp

Crackle pop

You got geological formations full of fossiles
 
Curious Cdn
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

Vitrafied stone all over the place, glass as well, tektites, whole lotta electricity goin on, not to long ago, made us think about the hot violent gods, we remember,

No tick-tick-tick of Beta particles? Some radioactive elements throw those off for hundreds of thousands of years.

No metal artifacts hinting at some technology more advanced than lost wax casting?

Flanders will contain billions of pieces of shell casing until they are incorporated into some sedimentary rocks, along with barbed wire, bully beef tins and little bits and pieces of blasted human bone.
 

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