Drunk Driving Program Goes Too Far?


karrie
#1
A drunk driving campaign in the US stepped up their mock accident program by sending police officers into a class full of students to inform them that two of their classmates had been killed the night before when they were struck by a drunk driver.

Students were left to grieve for a full 2 hours before they were informed that it was all part of the program, and they hadn't in fact lost their friends.

While some defend the actions, others are outraged.

Personally, I think it's deplorable. Especially having lost classmates to car wrecks... the idea that when the school came to inform us, we wouldn't believe them and would instead assume it was some 'play', is sad.
 
Kreskin
#2
That is crazy. I'd raise hell over it if it happened locally.
 
tracy
#3
That's sick.
 
lone wolf
#4
It gave the kids two hours to experience the pain of a loss - two hours to realize it can happen close to home. I don't support the method, but if it scared someone into staying sober that day, it worked
 
tracy
#5
Off topic, but I don't understand why people are still stupid enough to drink and drive. We've had decades of public service announcements, education programs, grieving family members talking about their losses, etc. I have no tolerance for the level of stupidity it takes to ignore the obvious fact that drinking and driving isn't a good idea.
 
karrie
#6
I'm with you Tracy. I don't get it at all.
 
Kreskin
#7
If they have to run fake drunk driving death programs, maybe the problem isn't as bad as they want kids to think.
 
karrie
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

It gave the kids two hours to experience the pain of a loss - two hours to realize it can happen close to home. I don't support the method, but if it scared someone into staying sober that day, it worked

The thing is though wolf, why would it stick once the anger hit? "This is what it feels like to lose someone".... but it was a lie that they lost them. It wasn't real. Frankly I think it would trivialize it to them. Like we're trying to desensitize them to the deaths of their friends, and make plays out of the consequences of drinking and driving.

The mock accident scenes do a better job than this, IMO, of driving home the consequences and ramifications.
 
Risus
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

It gave the kids two hours to experience the pain of a loss - two hours to realize it can happen close to home. I don't support the method, but if it scared someone into staying sober that day, it worked

When I first read the topic, my first reaction was that they went too far, but the more I think about it I think lone wolf might have the right reply.
 
Kreskin
#10
How would they feel if a parent phoned the police station and school the next morning to say their kid was so distraught over what happened they committed suicide? Give them a couple of hours to stew over it, then send the kid to school.
 
lone wolf
#11
How would it trivialize or desensitize kids to anything that TV and videogames already haven't? For two hours, they weren't immortal. For two hours they experienced something kids seldom do any more - vulnerability. We've saftied them away from the real world. Kids aren't stupid enough to not realize the next time, it might be real. That's the job of over-protective and doting parents.
Last edited by lone wolf; Jun 10th, 2008 at 11:38 PM..
 
Zan
#12
I think I'm in agreement with Risus and lone wolf here... it's pretty diabolical, I'll admit that - my gut reaction was one of horror.

But having experienced a small taste of what the world looks like when a ****ty consequence occurs might just prove to be an effective way to plow past the jaded outlook that has invaded our society... particularly our youth.

Some of us are still able to recall seeing something on tv and actually being shocked. Ask any youth under the age of 12 what it would take to shock them. If you're surprised by their answer, you haven't been paying attention. Maybe it takes something experiential to help a kid get it nowadays.

It makes me sad to see that we've had to resort to such tactics to get our kids' attention - but I'm ok with it if it actually makes a few kids stop and think. Maybe it will be one of mine. I like to think they don't need such a harsh reminder, but I don't see it as much different than some of the shock programs that take kids to the morgue to see the crappy consequences of addiction and violence. Who wants their kid to see that either?

Attending a real funeral would so much worse, imo.
 
Kreskin
#13
But their friend didn't do anything wrong. The faceless drunk driver did something wrong. What lesson can be learned from a friend being innocent yet getting killed by a stranger? If the cops feel it is necessary to play mindgames, the issue should be about how much trouble their friend has gotten into by doing the DUI and killing someone else. The life altering consequences of doing something stupid is easier to relate to.
 
L Gilbert
#14
I wonder if they'll ever decide to try fake child molestation, fake rape, fake terrorism or something.
 
Zan
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Kreskin View Post

But their friend didn't do anything wrong. The faceless drunk driver did something wrong. What lesson can be learned from a friend being innocent yet getting killed by a stranger? If the cops feel it is necessary to play mindgames, the issue should be about how much trouble their friend has gotten into by doing the DUI and killing someone else. The life altering consequences of doing something stupid is easier to relate to.

I don't know if kids really relate in a comprehensive way to the whole 'getting into trouble' angle... they're immortal after all - and bad things only happen to other people. It's one of the symptoms of adolescence. But this... this removes that last vestige of denial from them. Losing a friend affects them in a real way... and also forces them to acknowledge their own mortality. There's the wake up call. This could stop some kid from getting behind a wheel drunk, or stop a friend from doing so.

I'll bet my last dollar that the parent of a teen that either died or killed someone else due to alcohol and driving would give anything to have had their child experience this on the possibility it might have made the kid choose differently.
 
Kreskin
#16
The flipside is every new generation has dealt with more 'shock and awe' than the last, and none of it has done much good. Perhaps if we lessened the amount of shock entering their heads they'd be in a better position to think clearly and make appropriate decisions.

I do know, if this happened to my kid I'd give them something to be distraught about in return. I don't send my kid to school to be distraught. If that was goal I'd just leave her at home with her mother.
 
MikeyDB
#17
Far better to "fake" a catastrophe than let American service-age youngsters see the carnage their governent has participated in creating in Iraq......

While the person choosing to operate a motor vehicle while impaired is unarguably at fault when anything unfortunate happens....who will these moms and dads blame when Johnny and Sally get to see burn victims and amputees that the government that their moms and dads supported....return home from Iraq?

It's a form of conditioning that's accepted as appropriate. Make people feel great sorrow and loss...then say..."Just kidding!"........
 
gerryh
#18
obsess much mikey?
 
Praxius
#19
I was a student who played in one of those drinking and driving scenarios back when I was in grade 11. They had makup artists come and make us bloody and disgusting and pulled out two smashed up cars for us to get into to playout an emergency procedure as they hauled us out with jaws of life and all that good stuff. I think I got to play the dead guy if I remember correctly.

In all honesty, it didn't go far enough if you ask me, and the above situation isn't all that shocking to me.... in fact, I promote it.

Nobody seriously died, nobody is going to go and commit suicide because of being lied to, and all they did was play with their minds to activate the emotion button to make something stick in their heads, which needs to be done more often these days.

Hell, parents used to (Dunno if they still do it) go and haul their kids into prison or jail for the night to scared the snot out of them and to be scared of being yelled at by criminals inches away from them as they yelled and screamed at them......

.... It did a kid good to scare some sh*t out of them, and I think that's what's missing in todays kids.... they need to be scared sh*tless of the world.

In response to Kreskin's quote:

"The flipside is every new generation has dealt with more 'shock and awe' than the last, and none of it has done much good. Perhaps if we lessened the amount of shock entering their heads they'd be in a better position to think clearly and make appropriate decisions."

I tend to disagree with that. What you are describing sounds like pampering, censoring and protecting them from the realities of life. If you don't educate them of both the good and the bad in the world, how can you expect them to make appropriate decisions?

That's the problem with today's teenagers and their views on sex. Nobody is teaching them the proper things to know anymore, and they're going around thinking Oral and Anal sex isn't actually sex..... and now the STD's are spiking considderably.... esspecially in the US from a few reports I have come across.

Avoiding the realities of life doesn't help them in the slightest.... it only creates ignorant children who make very poor decisions because they don't know any better or were never taught any better.

You claimed that each generation is subjected to more shock and awe over the last generation..... and to a degree I can agree, but I also disagree as well. Think of all the things our grand parents and parents grew up experiencing during the great wars as children.

Think about what it must have been like for children in Europe during WWII with dead and rotting soldiers and civilians scattered through ruined cities and towns.

What about the drug crazes of the 60's?

How about the Victorian era?

Public Witch Burnings and Guillotines?

I agree that more graphical content is being shown through our medias then ever before.... but when it comes to the actual public displays that used to pass through our societies over the decades/centuries.... I'd say children are more protected from those things then ever before......

Hince also why many might think they're invencible.... that they can drink and drive better then someone else..... that they won't get an STD from giving a blow job, etc..... they are not exposed to the harsh realities the generations past had to go through.... everything is a computer simulation, a movie, TV show, or something on the news in another country..... they don't have a direct connection to loss and consequence and to me, what they did above by faking the deaths of fellow students, is exactly what the doctor ordered.
Last edited by Praxius; Jun 11th, 2008 at 11:44 AM..
 
karrie
#20
The big problem that I see is when the school comes into your class room to inform you that Sam got drunk and hit an approach with his truck the night before. He was thrown clear out of his vehicle, and was found dead in a field hundreds of meters away.

The class sits and silently stares at the administrator, because you know darn well these programs run all across the US.

The only problem is, it's not the program, and none of the kids are buying it. No one's letting the gravity of the reality that their friend is dead sink in, because they're used to being lied to about these things.
 
Tonington
#21
It kind of reminds me of that commercial some of you may have seen recently. It's a UN commercial where people show up with an eviction order, while the kids are sleeping. The man says he wants to see his lawyer, they say that's a good idea. Something about refugees.

I think there are better ways to educate students. But who knows...
 
talloola
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by MikeyDB View Post

Far better to "fake" a catastrophe than let American service-age youngsters see the carnage their governent has participated in creating in Iraq......

While the person choosing to operate a motor vehicle while impaired is unarguably at fault when anything unfortunate happens....who will these moms and dads blame when Johnny and Sally get to see burn victims and amputees that the government that their moms and dads supported....return home from Iraq?

It's a form of conditioning that's accepted as appropriate. Make people feel great sorrow and loss...then say..."Just kidding!"........

Yes, yes, yes, totally agree.
 
Praxius
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

The big problem that I see is when the school comes into your class room to inform you that Sam got drunk and hit an approach with his truck the night before. He was thrown clear out of his vehicle, and was found dead in a field hundreds of meters away.

The class sits and silently stares at the administrator, because you know darn well these programs run all across the US.

The only problem is, it's not the program, and none of the kids are buying it. No one's letting the gravity of the reality that their friend is dead sink in, because they're used to being lied to about these things.

We're all used to being lied to everyday of our lives in some form or another.... they better get used to it. I was lied to about many things as a kid going through school..... all for my best interests and all that.... if they don't believe them when they say buddy was killed in a drinking and driving accident, then they can check the news to confirm and let the reality set in then.... regardless they're going to be encountering times in their lives where they're going to know somebody who will die unexpectedly and eventually they're going to have to learn how to deal with it.

Everybody always thinks they know you're not supposed to drink and drive, and yet many still think they can do it, esspecially younger teenagers who just got their license. They (Most) haven't had the experiences yet of what consequences can occur from drinking and driving and figure it's usually people who are completely smashed, drank too much, or just don't know how to drive properly, and it's not until they hear of someone they know who was killed by that action, that it just might hit home for them.

Hell, I had a friend a few years back who was 21/22'ish at the time, who got drunk and drove the rest of the friends back to their homes... apparently he did it a few times before and never had a problem. Well this last time he did it, he lost his concentration for a split second, was speeding, and he drove the car up along the sidewalk right in front of a popular pizza place down the road from where I live.

He was pretty shaken up from it, understanding that he risked his friend's lives by doing what he did, as well as his own, but being myself, I drove it home for him even further..... pointing out that not only could that have made him lose enough control of the car to steer into the other lane and hit head on with another car with a family of five..... or what could have happened if there were people walking on the sidewalk when he drove over it? How would he have felt if he hit a mother walking a baby stroller with her newborn?

By the end of my little talk I almost had him crying as he was shaken so much from the concepts..... whether or not he learned from his mistakes I can not say, but he has had very clear warning of what may occur if he does it again, and if he does do it again and something does happen.... he has nobody else to blame but himself.

Regardless if the kids think it's not true when teachers tell them this stuff based on truth or lies, so long as they can hit home and scare the snot out of a few kids about the consequences of those types of actions, I say more power to them.

They'll have plenty of time to mourn for their lossed friends if and when it really does happen.
 
eh1eh
#24
I think the only lesson those kids learned was that authority figures are deceitful, lying manipulators. Which just happens to be true. So maybe they learned a valuable lesson.
 
mabudon
#25
Emotional hijacking should be left for Disney films and crappy TV shows for morons. I agree wholeheartedly with eh1eh (good to see you again man, still got that pitcher plant ??)


Education and information should be free of bias and free of trickery in my mind- learning complex things with mnemonics might be a trick of sorts, but "teaching through deception" is tantamount to mind-control

people should be taught to THINK and UNDERSTAND and make judgements based on knowledge, not fear

Whoever previously said "how long would the lesson stick once the anger kicked in" is 100% sopt on in my view, well played sir
 
darkbeaver
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by tracy View Post

Off topic, but I don't understand why people are still stupid enough to drink and drive. We've had decades of public service announcements, education programs, grieving family members talking about their losses, etc. I have no tolerance for the level of stupidity it takes to ignore the obvious fact that drinking and driving isn't a good idea.

Ever been drunk or stupid or both?
 
tracy
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

Ever been drunk or stupid or both?

Not stupid enough to drive while drinking, no.... and I've been REALLY drunk before. When we go out, either one of us doesn't drink or we take a cab if everybody plans on drinking. It's pretty easy.
 
karrie
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by tracy View Post

Not stupid enough to drive while drinking, no.... and I've been REALLY drunk before. When we go out, either one of us doesn't drink or we take a cab if everybody plans on drinking. It's pretty easy.

I've only had ONE time where I considered it. We'd been drinking all night when my drunk hubby realized he was having an asthma attack, and didn't have his meds. Couldn't get a cab. He wasn't at a point where he needed emergency care yet, but he definitely needed his meds. I was tempted. But, we started pouring strong coffee to him, and sat outside in the cool air, and waited out the hour+ for the cab to arrive, while keeping the phone close to call 911 if he hit that point. It was not a fun evening. But, just for a typical night, I can't imagine even considering it.
 
Praxius
#29
Never had the urge before, nor will I have the urge to drink and drive.
 

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