Psychodelic drugs and mental health


Cliffy
#1
The Big Trip: How psychedelic drugs are changing lives and transforming psychiatry

For decades, hallucinogens have been associated with technicolour dance floors, sitar-driven Beatles tunes and the controversial evangelism of Timothy Leary.
But today, drugs like LSD and MDMA are undergoing a radical transformation — from party drug to potentially revolutionary treatment tool.
Around the world, clinical trials are examining psychedelic drug therapy as a possible treatment for everything from PTSD to cigarette addiction.
Listen to our special, hour-long radio edition of The Big Trip, a special Day 6 program about the latest in psychedelic drug research.


To date, many of the studies have been preliminary, with small sample sizes.
But experts say MDMA and psilocybin — better known as ecstasy and the key ingredient in magic mushrooms — could be available for prescription use within the next five years.
Earlier this year, Day 6 spoke with the researchers behind the studies — and the patients who say psychedelic therapy has changed their lives.


More: https://www.cbc.ca/radio/day6/the-bi...atry-1.4955762
 
petros
#2
The use of LSD on mental health patients isn't new and it's origins of treatment came out of Saskatchewan.

If you f-cking useless, dirty hippies didn't abuse LSD turning into a party drug it would have remained as a treatment.

http://activehistory.ca/2014/03/psyc...dian-prairies/
 
MHz
#3
"Our two mental hospitals were classed in 1954 as among the three worst in the world by Dr. John Weir, Medical Director of the Rockefeller Foundation"
The words about that hospital. I wonder how many of the Indian patients recovered. You seem as bitter as the ones with the diseased blankets would be before they were all handed out

https://www.drugfreeworld.org/drugfacts/lsd/a-short-history.html

Albert Hofmann, a chemist working for Sandoz Pharmaceutical, synthesized1 LSD for the first time in 1938, in Basel, Switzerland, while looking for a blood stimulant. However, its hallucinogenic effects were unknown until 1943 when Hofmann accidentally consumed some LSD. It was later found that an oral dose of as little as 25 micrograms (equal in weight to a few grains of salt) is capable of producing vivid hallucinations.

Because of its similarity to a chemical present in the brain and its similarity in effects to certain aspects of psychosis, LSD was used in experiments by psychiatrists through the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s. While the researchers failed to discover any medical use for the drug, the free samples supplied by Sandoz Pharmaceuticals for the experiments were distributed broadly, leading to wide use of this substance.
LSD was popularized in the 1960s by individuals such as psychologist Timothy Leary, who encouraged American students to “turn on, tune in, and drop out.” This created an entire counterculture of drug abuse and spread the drug from America to the United Kingdom and the rest of Europe. Even today, use of LSD in the United Kingdom is significantly higher than in other parts of the world.

Psychiatric mind-control programs focusing on LSD and other hallucinogens created a generation of acidheads.

While the ‘60s counterculture used the drug to escape the problems of society, the Western intelligence community and the military saw it as a potential chemical weapon. In 1951, these organizations began a series of experiments. US researchers noted that LSD “is capable of rendering whole groups of people, including military forces, indifferent to their surroundings and situations, interfering with planning and judgment, and even creating apprehension, uncontrollable confusion and terror.”
Experiments in the possible use of LSD to change the personalities of intelligence targets, and to control whole populations, continued until the United States officially banned the drug in 1967.
Use of LSD declined in the 1980s, but picked up again in the 1990s. For a few years after 1998 LSD had become more widely used at dance clubs and all-night raves by older teens and young adults. Use dropped significantly in 2000 or so.
 
Cliffy
#4
 
Cliffy
#5
 
darkbeaver
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The use of LSD on mental health patients isn't new and it's origins of treatment came out of Saskatchewan.

If you f-cking useless, dirty hippies didn't abuse LSD turning into a party drug it would have remained as a treatment.

http://activehistory.ca/2014/03/psyc...dian-prairies/


I disagree, the fact is that if it was effective meant it had to be gotten rid of because it did not support return customers. You seem to think todays medicine is about healing people when in fact it,s about building strong return customer numbers. If it,s good for the patient it,s not so good for the corporate pusher.
 
MHz
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

WTHell channel is that? Mom said the same thing way back when I was still in the womb, it's still clear as a bell, . . . mostly.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnwFmaLiKl4
 
petros
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

I disagree, the fact is that if it was effective meant it had to be gotten rid of because it did not support return customers. You seem to think todays medicine is about healing people when in fact it,s about building strong return customer numbers. If it,s good for the patient it,s not so good for the corporate pusher.

Sorry but the hippies ruined it. That's fact.

If you want customers you cure them and then tell them they have something else and start again.
 
MHz
#9
As soon as they knew they were taking something they invented rock music. You want it in the bio-warfare labs with the diseased blankets. Not many fuktards would be bragging about what went on in an asylum that was classified as the worst in Canada. Stand up and take a bow for letting the world see your true colors.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5T4XBwALPi0&t=83s