NAFTA screwing Mexicans


darkbeaver
Republican
#1
From AxisofLogic.com
News - Americas
Mexico: Staple Foods at Risk From NAFTA
By Diego Cevallos
Feb 27, 2007, 01:17



MEXICO CITY, Feb 26 - When the Mexican government negotiated the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), in force since 1994, it estimated that 14 years of safeguards for its maize and beans would be enough time for local production of these crops to become competitive. But things did not work out that way.
In only 11 months' time the market for these products, the traditional staple foods of Mexican consumers, will be wide open to receive maize and beans from the other two NAFTA partners, Canada and the United States.
The tension is growing. The resources that were to improve agricultural competitiveness have been frittered away, and the plans never worked.
The Felipe Caldern administration announced on Friday that to prepare for the free market, it will grant farmers this year support in the amount of 640 million dollars.
The government promised that these funds, to be spent on advice to boost competitiveness and on seeds and other back-up, will be additional to public investment in rural areas, on healthcare and roads, for example, totalling an unprecedented 16 billion dollars this year.
Furthermore, new inter-ministerial work and supervision strategies will be adopted to face the challenge of free trade in maize and beans, grown by 3.7 million small farmers, the majority of whom are poor.
Caldern said he would propose to the governments of the United States and Canada that a working group be created to find ways of mitigating the impact of this extension of free trade in Mexico.
His goal is to secure the backing of these countries to improve production and marketing of the Mexican crops, he said.
But Caldern's announcements have not satisfied small farmers' organisations, opposition politicians and activists, who regard NAFTA as the main cause of the problems in the rural areas, home to 30 million out of the country's 104 million people.
Removing the tariff barriers will sound the death knell for rural workers, said the National Peasant Federation (CNC), linked to the opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) which promoted, negotiated and signed NAFTA in 1992, while it was still in power.
U.S. competition in the product categories to be liberated will be very tough on Mexico. The maize yield in this country is about 2.3 tons per hectare, compared with 7.2 tons per hectare in the United States, while U.S. farmers produce 2.9 times more beans per hectare than Mexican farmers.
The United States subsidises its farmers at a level of over 19 billion dollars a year, more than all of Mexico's rural sector funding sources put together.
And Mexico is not self-sufficient in these food crops. In 2006 it had to import 5.2 million tons of maize and 122,000 tons of beans, nearly all from the United States, to cope with domestic demand.
Because NAFTA clauses allow these food imports by Mexico, some observers argue that the market has in fact already been thrown open.
Small farmers' organisations want the Caldern administration to renegotiate the treaty. However, the president is not considering this option.
Renegotiating the treaty is not the most promising approach, unless Mexico wishes to offer concessions to its NAFTA partners in relation to products like tomatoes, avocadoes and green vegetables, where this country already has considerable advantages, regional integration expert and professor at several universities Germn de la Reza told IPS.
NAFTA was negotiated en bloc, with joint and reciprocal commitments and concessions in different product categories. "If a single element were to be renegotiated now, the whole treaty would be at risk of falling apart, and none of the partners wants that to happen," de la Reza said.
Former President Vicente Fox (2000-2006) broached the subject of renegotiating the agricultural chapter of the treaty with the United States, but the suggestion was rejected out of hand.
De la Reza hopes that the financial support for farmers announced on Friday will be put to its proper use and not, as in the past, be distributed in return for political backing.
Mexico should be able to honour its commitment to remove tariff barriers for maize and beans in 2008, so long as enough support is given to farmers, de la Reza said.
The main opposition force, the leftwing Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD), together with small farmers organisations and activists, are adamant that opening maize and beans production to competition is suicide. They blame NAFTA, which has been in force for 13 years, for the country's agricultural problems.
In contrast, Braulio Serna, head of the agricultural development unit of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC)'s local office, said that NAFTA does not affect Mexico's rural sector to a significant extent.
In 2005, Serna presented an exhaustive study on Mexican agriculture in which he claimed that only a biased view could point to free trade as a determining factor in the country's agricultural performance.
Rural problems, poverty and mass migration are rather the effects of poor public policies, global and national economic crises, climate factors, low levels of education and training, and depressed international prices of a number of agricultural goods, Serna said.
De la Reza also blames bad policies, going back to before NAFTA came into effect. Governments have had 14 years to prepare for this challenge, and they have done nothing.
With the barriers about to come down, small farmers are predicting yet another crisis. (END/2007)
http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=36728

 
Avro
No Party Affiliation
#2
Oh...excuse me.

I thought this was something else and there would be pictures.....my bad.
 
#juan
No Party Affiliation
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Avro View Post

Oh...excuse me.

I thought this was something else and there would be pictures.....my bad.


Too funny...Lol
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#4
I'll find a picture for you, something in crayon perhaps.
 
Avro
No Party Affiliation
#5
How about finger painting......
 
Nuggler
#6
Yes, well, sucks to be them eh.

Lets see if the American workers have any sympathy, or Canadians for that matter. Both have been and will be worked over quite nicely by NAFTA.

To quote that great philospher, Lyin Brian Baloney::"Jobs Jobs Jobs" . He forgot to say. "They will mostly be leaving."

That great sucking sound you hear is our way of life going down the tube.

I see everyone is up in arms...............not.

Whadya gonna do when they come for ...........YOU??

The Mexican peasants are a tad less easily mollified than the Canadian counterpart, and some Mexican politicos may lose their cajones over this. Would that it had happened here also.

Sheep to the phuckin slaughter.

 
Vicious
#7
Let me understand this.

A government signs an agreement with other nations and sells it to the public by saying that the government will work over the timeframe spelled out in the agreement to ensure that the changes embedded in the agreement don't cause undo hardship to the public. Then this same government does nothing except fritter away the cash that is to be applied to the problem. leaving the problem for his successor to deal with.

Are there Liberals in Mexico too?
 
Avro
No Party Affiliation
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by oldnugly View Post

Yes, well, sucks to be them eh.

Lets see if the American workers have any sympathy, or Canadians for that matter. Both have been and will be worked over quite nicely by NAFTA.

To quote that great philospher, Lyin Brian Baloney::"Jobs Jobs Jobs" . He forgot to say. "They will mostly be leaving."

That great sucking sound you hear is our way of life going down the tube.

I see everyone is up in arms...............not.

Whadya gonna do when they come for ...........YOU??

The Mexican peasants are a tad less easily mollified than the Canadian counterpart, and some Mexican politicos may lose their cajones over this. Would that it had happened here also.

Sheep to the phuckin slaughter.

BS and more BS

The unemployment rate is at a 30 year low, trade with the U.S. is higher since NAFTA and we have a trade surplus with them.

The doom and gloom predicted by mostly the left never came to pass.
 
hermanntrude
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Vicious View Post

A government signs an agreement with other nations and sells it to the public by saying that the government will work over the timeframe spelled out in the agreement to ensure that the changes embedded in the agreement don't cause undo hardship to the public. Then this same government does nothing except fritter away the cash that is to be applied to the problem. leaving the problem for his successor to deal with.

this is pretty much the standard for all political policies
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Avro View Post

BS and more BS

The unemployment rate is at a 30 year low, trade with the U.S. is higher since NAFTA and we have a trade surplus with them.

The doom and gloom predicted by mostly the left never came to pass.

You better check out your doom and gloom info Avro, my kids started working for less than I did in the early seventys, and the report you posted this morning from the Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives spells that out. Flipping burgers and working at Wal-mart are not good long term jobs.
 
Zzarchov
#11
Sadly those days are gone. The world is a different place. We can no longer discontinue trade with half the world because they are commies. And surprise surprise.

We live better than most countries. Its no surprise as the wealth starts to even out that those on top go down DarkBeaver.

Not that its good, but barring a good all threat of nuclear annihilation, its out of our hands. China has more Honour roll students than we have students, is it any wonder we can't compete?
 
Avro
No Party Affiliation
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

You better check out your doom and gloom info Avro, my kids started working for less than I did in the early seventys, and the report you posted this morning from the Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives spells that out. Flipping burgers and working at Wal-mart are not good long term jobs.

They weren't good long term jobs in the 70's either.

This as you know is becoming more of a knowledge based economy.

If you don't get educated then it's the walmart life for you and that isn't the fault of anybody but the individual.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Avro View Post

They weren't good long term jobs in the 70's either.

This as you know is becoming more of a knowledge based economy.

If you don't get educated then it's the walmart life for you and that isn't the fault of anybody but the individual.

Becoming a knowledge based economy, that's the kind of empty capitalist terminology that's made it easy for them to get filty rich and the working class to slide into the nineteenth century. No economy runs without a knowledge base and they never did. The industrial capacity of the west has been shipped overseas, this is why good long term jobs with benefits have gone. I know engineers driving trucks and sweeping floors, an education used to be a gaurentee of good long term employment. Many educated univercity graduates hit the streets fifty or sixty thou in the hole before they even apply for work the system has been loaded against the people, and the people have become the property of the corporations. The individual is powerless against the system. Right now this country needs plumbers, mechanics, carpenters, farmers you name a trade and we need those people. I remember when the system decided everyone would become computer programmers and we didn't need tradespeople anymore. Check out what a plumber in Toronto earns, if he'll talk to you.
 
CDNBear
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Avro View Post

They weren't good long term jobs in the 70's either.

This as you know is becoming more of a knowledge based economy.

If you don't get educated then it's the walmart life for you and that isn't the fault of anybody but the individual.

Couldn't agree more.

The jobs lost were mickey mouse, some even came back, once they realized it was more beneficial to be made here. The jobs we got in turn, were higher paying skilled and semi-skilled jobs. Just look at how the standard of living grew.

I like this part of the OP article...
Quote:

The resources that were to improve agricultural competitiveness have been frittered away, and the plans never worked.

Who fritted it away?
Who was responsible for the plans?
Didn't someone realize the plans were shyte, before the 11th hour?

I doubt it was Canadian or US farmers.
 
Ace
#15
Oh great. 1/2 of those farmers will probably be coming here to the US now illegally. NAFTA sucks. Americans lost their manufacturing base to Mexico, then China, and in return got flooded with rural Mexican farmers who can't cut it with US imports ruining our cities and being leeches on legal tax paying residents.
 
Zzarchov
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Avro View Post

They weren't good long term jobs in the 70's either.

This as you know is becoming more of a knowledge based economy.

If you don't get educated then it's the walmart life for you and that isn't the fault of anybody but the individual.


This is my problem, we say "its a knowledge based economy" then fail to invest in knowledge based education for our future workers.

The best knowledge based education is in India and China right now.

And in the demographics game we are screwed. When it comes to knowledge based, sheer numbers means China has more honour roll students than North America has students. India is the same way.

How do you compete with that in a game of intellect?

We are hosed if we don't get our act togethor and act like "it'll all be alright" cause no one will be there to pay your pensions when you retire, we'll be destitute.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#17
Knowledge based my arse, we don't build shoes, cloths, furniture, televisions , or ten million other things we used to because of the capitalist idea of shipping the work to the far east or anywhere else they could get it done by slaves. We play with service industries like telemarketing which has largely moved to India. And Wal-mart sucks any loose cash out of most communitys because we're to stupid and gutless to protect our own people and jobs.
 
Avro
No Party Affiliation
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

Knowledge based my arse, we don't build shoes, cloths, furniture, televisions , or ten million other things we used to because of the capitalist idea of shipping the work to the far east or anywhere else they could get it done by slaves. We play with service industries like telemarketing which has largely moved to India. And Wal-mart sucks any loose cash out of most communitys because we're to stupid and gutless to protect our own people and jobs.

We don't have free trade with the far east, I thought we were talking about NAFTA the job creator.

It is a knowledge based society sorry if you don't see it that way but it's hard to find a good paying job without a good education.

The days of earning top dollar right out of high school are over unless you open your own business. which is okay as well considering entrepreneurs are the heart of a growing economy.

Here's link about our KBE.

http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/epic/site/...mem199903e.PDF
 
Vicious
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

Knowledge based my arse, we don't build shoes, cloths, furniture, televisions , or ten million other things we used to because of the capitalist idea of shipping the work to the far east or anywhere else they could get it done by slaves. We play with service industries like telemarketing which has largely moved to India. And Wal-mart sucks any loose cash out of most communitys because we're to stupid and gutless to protect our own people and jobs.

Comrade Beaver, I personally blame the consumer not the producer. If quality and not price was the deciding factor for most consumers, we wouldn't be where we are with respect to clothes, furniture, etc. To most consumer buying cheaper crap more often is more appealing than buying quality once.

The producer is only reacting to market demand.
 
Toro
#20
NAFTA is wonderful.

Its been great for Mexico.
 

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