Would you fly in a 737 Max 8 right now?


Dixie Cup
+2
#181
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Unfortunately the only way bombardier can buy anything is with Canadian taxpayer $$$$$.



Yeah, they tend to live on taxpayer hand-outs on a frequent basis - too large to fail??? Huh!
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#182
Quote: Originally Posted by Dixie Cup View Post

Yeah, they tend to live on taxpayer hand-outs on a frequent basis - too large to fail??? Huh!

Not like Boeing, Lockheed who have been heavily subsidized for 75 years by severely padded military contracts. They are government $$$$$$$ junkies.
 
taxslave
+2
#183
Quote: Originally Posted by Dixie Cup View Post

Yeah, they tend to live on taxpayer hand-outs on a frequent basis - too large to fail??? Huh!

I was once told by a politician that the only reason Bombardier exists is to hand out big welfare cheques to otherwise unemployable Quebec machinists.
 
VIBC
#184
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

I was once told by a politician that the only reason Bombardier exists is to hand out big welfare cheques to otherwise unemployable Quebec machinists.

Whatever you would like to hear, there's a politician who will tell it to you.
 
B00Mer
+1
#185
I'd buy Cannuck a free ticket on one..
 
Cannuck
#186
Sorry for repeatedly triggering you
 
petros
+3
#187
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

I'd buy Cannuck a free ticket on one..

He thinks Alleigant's 400 series are classy even when they drop him off 600km in the wrong direction.
 
taxslave
+2
#188
Quote: Originally Posted by VIBC View Post

Whatever you would like to hear, there's a politician who will tell it to you.

True, but in the case of Bombardier it fits. The feds have spent a lot of money propping up industry in Quebec that would not have happened anywhere else in the country.
 
AnnaEmber
+1
#189
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

He thinks Alleigant's 400 series are classy even when they drop him off 600km in the wrong direction.

haha and lose his gear, too?
 
NZDoug
#190
737NG series also has problems,
................
"
Airlines would have to retrofit thousands of in-service Boeing 737NG narrowbodies with redesigned engine cowls if the FAA enforces an NTSB recommendation stemming from an engine failure on Southwest Airlines Flight 1380 in April 2018.
The safety board on Nov. 19 announced its probable cause finding into the accident, tracing its origin to a “low-cycle” fatigue crack of one of the fan blades in the left CFM56-7B engine of the Southwest 737-700. The separation of the fan blade at its root—called a fan-blade-out (FBO) event—sent blade fragments into the engine fan case and compromised the outer fan cowl structure. Fragments of the fan cowl, including a latch keeper component, struck the left side of the fuselage near the cabin window at Row 14, dislodging the window and causing the rapid depressurization of the cabin.
The passenger in seat 14A was killed in the chain of events that occurred on the flight on April 17, 2018. It was the first fatality on a U.S. passenger airline since the crash of Colgan Air Flight 3407 in February 2009. There were 144 total passengers and five crew on the scheduled Southwest flight from New York LaGuardia Airport to Dallas Love Field. Southwest Capt. Tammie Jo Shults and First Officer Darren Ellisor performed an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport after the engine failed at 32,600 ft.
According to Aviation Week’s Fleet Discovery, 36% of in-service Boeing 737NG in the world are in Asia-Pacific. "
......................
https://aviationweek.com/asia-aerosp...f3bca506b81097
 
VIBC
#191
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

... The feds have spent a lot of money propping up industry in Quebec that would not have happened anywhere else in the country.

Nonsense, "the feds" prop up industries all over the country; and this has boom-all to do with the Boeing 737 Max 8.
 
NZDoug
#192
No to Boeing certifications.
Not good when a private company does government affairs.
Especially if its part of the M.I.C.
.............................................
"WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Federal Aviation Administration said on Tuesday it notified Boeing Co (BA.N) that the agency will be the only issuer of airworthiness certificates for all new 737 MAX planes, a role that it had shared with the aircraft maker in the past.
The U.S. air regulator also repeated that it has not completed its review of the 737 MAX aircraft design changes and associated pilot training.
In a letter sent to Boeing on Tuesday, the FAA said it “has determined that the public interest and safety in air commerce require that the FAA retain authority to issue airworthiness certificates and export certificates of airworthiness for all 737 MAX airplanes."
The agency said it will keep the authority to issue the certificates until it is confident Boeing has “fully functional quality control and verification processes in place” and that other Boeing procedures meet all regulatory standards.
“We continue to follow the lead of the FAA and global regulators,” Boeing spokesman Gordon Johndroe said by email. “They will determine when key milestones are achieved and when the fleet and training requirements are certified so the MAX can safely return to service.”
Boeing said earlier this month it expected the FAA would unground the 737 MAX planes around mid-December even though it did not expect the agency to complete its review of revised training requirements until January.
The 737 MAX, Boeing’s best-selling plane, has been grounded worldwide since March after crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people.
The company still has many hurdles to complete including a certification test flight that has not yet been scheduled and simulator work with international pilots. It must also complete a software documentation audit.
.................................................. .........
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-b...-idUSKBN1Y02KP
 
Curious Cdn
#193
Hey!

Ya wouldn't want no Commie-nists inspecting no planes, would you Boy?
 
spaminator
#194
Boeing suspends 737 production
Reuters
Published:
December 16, 2019
Updated:
December 16, 2019 5:43 PM EST
Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are stored on employee parking lots near Boeing Field, on June 27, 2019 in Seattle, Wash. Getty Images
SEATTLE/WASHINGTON — Boeing Co is temporarily halting 737 production in January for the first time in more than 20 years as the grounding of the planemaker’s best-selling MAX after two fatal crashes looks set to last well into 2020.
Boeing, which builds the 737 south of Seattle, said it will not lay off any employees during the production freeze, though the move could have repercussions across its global supply chain and the U.S. economy.
The decision, made by Boeing’s board after a two-day meeting in Chicago, follows news last week that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) would not approve the plane’s return to service before 2020.
The 737 MAX has been grounded since March after two crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people within five months, costing the plane manufacturer more than $9 billion so far.
Until now Boeing has continued to produce 737 MAX jets at a rate of 42 per month and purchase parts from suppliers at a rate of up to 52 units per month, even though deliveries are frozen until regulators approve the aircraft to fly commercially again.
Story continues below
Halting production will ease a severe squeeze on cash tied up in roughly 375 undelivered planes, but only at the risk of causing industrial problems when Boeing tries to return to normal, industry sources said. Supply chains are already under strain due to record demand and abrupt changes in factory speed can cause snags.
In 1997, Boeing announced a hit of $2.6 billion including hundreds of millions to deal with factory inefficiencies after it was forced to suspend output of its 737 and 747 lines due to supply chain problems.
Boeing said it will continue P8 production of the military version of the 737.
Boeing’s shares closed down 4% on Monday and fell 1% after hours. Shares in Spirit AeroSystems Holdings Inc, its biggest supplier, closed down 2%.
Spirit, which makes the MAX fuselage along with other parts such as pylons, said on Monday it would work with Boeing to understand any changes to the production rate.
Analysts highlighted Safran SA and Senior Plc as other suppliers that could experience disruptions.
Airlines with 737 MAX jets and orders also face added uncertainty after already scaling back flying schedules and delaying growth plans due to the grounding. Southwest Airlines Co, the largest 737 MAX customer, said last week it had reached a confidential compensation agreement with Boeing for a portion of a projected $830 million hit to operating income in 2019 from the grounding.
Transport Canada official says 737 MAX software 'has to go'
Boeing to invest US$1 billion in global safety drive: Sources
http://youtube.com/watch?v=FNurLwQvRUc
http://torontosun.com/business/money...duction-report
 
VIBC
#195
I still suspect the software is not the real, basic problem - it's just a clumsy and badly implemented attempt to compensate for design faults in analyzing the handling consequences of fitting the new engines.
 
spaminator
#196
Boeing fires CEO to steady spiralling 737 MAX crisis
Reuters
Published:
December 23, 2019
Updated:
December 23, 2019 11:54 PM EST
Boeing Co has fired Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg after repeatedly failing to contain the fallout from a pair of fatal crashes that halted output of its best-selling jetliner and tarnished its reputation with airlines and regulators.
Boeing — beset by one setback after another following the two air disasters — dropped Muilenburg as it became increasingly clear that he was making little headway resolving a crisis that has cost it US$9 billion, hurt suppliers and airlines and now threatens to cut the pace of U.S. economic growth.
Chairman David Calhoun, a former General Electric executive who has been on the Boeing board since 2009, will take over as CEO and president, effective from Jan. 13, Boeing said. Until then, Chief Financial Officer Greg Smith will run the world’s largest planemaker.
Boeing suspends 737 production
Boeing received 'unnecessary' contract boost for astronaut capsule: Watchdog
Canadian airlines try to reassure flyers after Ethiopian plane crash
“The board of directors decided that a change in leadership was necessary to restore confidence,” a Boeing statement said. A Boeing official said the board had deliberated over the weekend and decided to oust Muilenburg in a phone call on Sunday.
Muilenburg could not be reached for comment.
Boeing shares, which have dropped more than 20% over the past nine months, closed up 2.9%.
The 737 MAX has been grounded since March after two crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people within five months.
Boeing is struggling to mend relations with the U.S. and international regulators it needs to win over to get the jet back in the air.
After keeping assembly lines open and storing 400 planes to be ready for a return to flight, Boeing acknowledged this month it would not be able to reach its target of flying this year and announced it would halt 737 MAX production in January.
Boeing on Monday said shipments from 737 suppliers will be suspended for a month starting mid-January, adding that it was uncertain when production would restart.
Economists estimate that will lower overall U.S. economic growth by half a percentage point.
Muilenburg’s departure followed a week of dramatic setbacks for Boeing, which vies with Europe’s Airbus for leadership of the $150 billion jet industry.
They ranged from a decision to halt production of the MAX, to a public slap-down from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), a ratings downgrade and a space launch glitch on Friday.
Late Monday, the FAA confirmed it had received a new batch of documents from Boeing related to the MAX and was reviewing them. A person briefed on the matter confirmed a Seattle Times report that the new submission contained instant messages from a former Boeing senior pilot, Mark Forkner.
In October, Boeing turned over 2016 messages to the FAA between Forkner and another pilot that said he might have unintentionally misled the FAA and raised questions about the performance of a key safety system during testing. Boeing had earlier turned over the documents to the Justice Department, which has an ongoing criminal investigation into the MAX.
Based on Boeing securities filings, Muilenburg may be eligible for nearly $39 million in severance. Boeing declined to comment on the figure or whether he would accept it.
Boeing said last month Muilenburg had volunteered to give up his 2019 bonus and stock awards. For 2018, his bonus and equity awards amounted to some $20 million, according to filings.
His dismissal received backing from Peter DeFazio, chair of the U.S. House of Representatives’ transportation committee.
“It’s clear Dennis Muilenburg’s ouster was long overdue,” he said. “Under his watch, a long-admired company made a number of devastating decisions that suggest profit took priority over safety.”
‘RIGHT TOOL KIT?’
Calhoun, who is resigning from Blackstone to take the top job at Boeing, was respected by the industry, said aerospace analyst Richard Aboulafia of Teal Group.
“But long term, does he bring the right tool kit? Private equity leans companies out. That’s not Boeing’s problem right now.”
Boeing – which has taken flak from the Federal Aviation Administration for appearing to pressure the regulator by predicting when the MAX fly – pledged full transparency. It named a veteran PR boss from the auto industry.
“We don’t think it is controversial to suggest that Boeing’s MAX response has been a failure – and as a result we think it is wholly appropriate for the board to replace Muilenburg,” said Robert Stallard, analyst at Vertical Research Partners.
Muilenburg, an engineer who started at Boeing as an intern in 1985, fought a rising tide of public and regulatory scrutiny to try to steady the company during the crisis. He initiated a broad safety initiative involving heavy investments in training but was unable to shake off a set of awkward public appearances.
‘WE’VE MADE MISTAKES’
Muilenburg acknowledged errors in failing to give pilots more information on a stall-prevention system before the crashes and for taking months to disclose that it had made optional an alarm that alerts pilots to a mismatch of flight data.
“We’ve made mistakes and we got some things wrong. We’re improving and we’re learning,” he told lawmakers in October.
Speculation that he would be fired had been circulating in the industry for months, intensifying in October when the board stripped him of his chairman title — although he had also twice won expressions of confidence from Calhoun.
Muilenburg was credited with halting a drift in the company’s defence division and reshaping Boeing’s management.
But by keeping Muilenburg as long as it did, some experts say Boeing ignored part of the crisis communications playbook.
“You want to bring somebody from the outside to bring fresh perspective to ‘save the day,’” said Paul Argenti, a professor at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business. “He should have been gone a long time ago. He is part of the problem.”
http://youtube.com/watch?v=yp-8I9q3ImI
http://torontosun.com/news/world/boe...737-max-crisis
 
spaminator
#197
Boeing 737 MAX crisis adviser Michael Luttig to retire
Reuters
Published:
December 26, 2019
Updated:
December 26, 2019 5:13 PM EST
An American Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 8 flight from Los Angeles lands at Reagan National Airport before the jets were grounded. March 13, 2019. Joshua Roberts / REUTERS
Boeing Co said on Thursday Michael Luttig, who was appointed senior adviser to the planemaker’s board amid the 737 MAX crisis in May, will retire at the end of the year.
The company had named Luttig, who has served as general counsel since joining the company in 2006, to the position of counsellor and senior adviser to former chief executive officer Dennis Muilenburg and to Boeing’s board.
Luttig, often listed among the highest paid general counsels of publicly traded companies, helped anchor Boeing’s legal defence over the crashes of Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302.
The 737 MAX has been grounded since March after two crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people within a span of five months.
Luttig’s announcement to retire follows Muilenburg’s dismissal as chief executive officer this week, after repeatedly failing to contain the fallout from the crashes that halted output of its best-selling jetliner.
Story continues below
Chairman David Calhoun, a former General Electric executive who has been on Boeing’s board since 2009, replaced Muilenburg as the chief executive officer effective Jan. 13.
Boeing fires CEO to steady spiralling 737 MAX crisis
Boeing suspends 737 production
http://youtube.com/watch?v=68HTXINbV9I
http://youtube.com/watch?v=yp-8I9q3ImI
http://torontosun.com/business/money...ttig-to-retire
 
VIBC
#198
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Safest way to travel.

This in response to the question "Would you fly in a 737 Max 8 right now?" !!!!!
 
petros
#199
Would you fly in a Chinese C919?
 
VIBC
#200
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Would you fly in a Chinese C919?

Not without a good reason. As with any aircraft.

By the way, the correct response to "Would you fly in a 737 Max 8 right now?" is ..
You can't.
 
petros
+1
#201
If I could and it was flown manually? Sure, no problem.
 
NZDoug
#202
Quite a good vid to explain the basic problem, engine ground clearance, and arrogance in FAA's trust in Boeing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2tuKiiznsY
 
petros
+1
#203
Pratt and Whitney saw the issue back in 2011 but rather than engines being too big they claimed they were too small. They were even right in saying a whole new aircraft would need to be built.

I wonder what the rush was to risk lives just to save on fuel?
 
VIBC
-1
#204
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

..... rather than engines being too big they claimed they were too small.

Confuses physical size with power output

Quote:

I wonder what the rush was to risk lives just to save on fuel?

Threatened profits.
 
spaminator
+1
#205
Boeing, FAA reviewing wiring issue on grounded 737 MAX
Reuters
Published:
January 5, 2020
Updated:
January 5, 2020 4:13 PM EST
Aerial photos showing Boeing 737 Max airplanes parked at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, U.S. October 20, 2019. Gary He / REUTERS
WASHINGTON — Boeing Co and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) confirmed on Sunday they are reviewing a wiring issue that could potentially cause a short circuit on the grounded 737 MAX.
Boeing spokesman Gordon Johndroe said Sunday the U.S. planemaker “identified this issue as part of that rigorous process, and we are working with the FAA to perform the appropriate analysis. It would be premature to speculate as to whether this analysis will lead to any design changes.”
The New York Times reported Boeing is reviewing whether two bundles of wiring are too close together, which could lead to a short circuit and potentially result in a crash if pilots did not respond appropriately.
The FAA said in a statement Sunday the agency and company “are analyzing certain findings from a recent review of the proposed modifications to the Boeing 737 MAX.” The agency added it will “ensure that all safety-related issues identified during this process are addressed.”
Boeing is currently working to design separating the wiring bundles if necessary and conducting extensive analysis to establish if the electrical fault could occur in a real-world scenario, a company official said.
Story continues below
Officials said the FAA had directed Boeing to complete an audit in December. The wiring issue could push back the return of the MAX, the officials added. Reuters has reported previously the FAA is not likely to approve the plane until at least February and might not until March or later.
The FAA flagged the wiring issue as potentially “catastrophic.” It is possible other protections like shielding, insulation and circuit breakers could prevent the short circuit, a company official said.
Boeing will halt production of the 737 MAX this month following the grounding in March of its best-selling plane after two fatal crashes in five months killed 346 people.
Last month, Boeing’s board fired Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg after repeatedly failing to contain the fallout from the crashes that tarnished its reputation with airlines and regulators.
The crisis has cost Boeing $9 billion, and has hurt suppliers and airlines.
Boeing is struggling to mend relations with the U.S. and international regulators it needs to win over to get the jet back in the air.
Separately, U.S. and European regulators are expected to return to Iowa this week to review a software documentation audit of the 737 MAX that was not completed last year, officials said Sunday. FAA and the European Union Aviation Safety Agency are scheduled to meet in Seattle this week and then return to Rockwell Collins facility in Cedar Rapids, Iowa next weekend to review the audit.
http://torontosun.com/news/world/boe...ounded-737-max
 
Danbones
#206
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

If I could and it was flown manually? Sure, no problem.

Leaked Emails PROVE Boeing KNEW The 737 MAX Was Dangerous, They Admit To Covering it Up


RedeemedOne
17 minutes ago
"Plane is literally uncontrollable upon computer malfunction." Minor details...

28 minutes ago
And where's the leftist outrage?


Where is it? “Orange man bad!!!!!!! REEE!!!!”

That’s where it is.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=weXGcQwunUY
 
B00Mer
+1
#207
Better question would you fly any plane over Iran right now??
 
Ron in Regina
+2
#208
Would I fly in a 737 Max 8 right now? Not out of Tehran anyway....
 
spaminator
#209
Boeing's ousted CEO departs with $62M, even without severance pay
Reuters
Published:
January 10, 2020
Updated:
January 10, 2020 8:45 PM EST
In this file photo taken on October 29, 2019 Boeing President and Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg testifies before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on Aviation Safety and the Future of Boeings 737 MAX in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. MANDEL NGAN / AFP via Getty Images
Boeing Co’s ousted chief executive officer, Dennis Muilenburg, is leaving the company with $62 million in compensation and pension benefits but will receive no severance pay in the wake of the 737 MAX crisis.
Muilenburg was fired from the job in December as Boeing failed to contain the fallout from a pair of fatal crashes that halted output of the company’s bestselling 737 MAX jetliner and tarnished its reputation with airlines and regulators.
The compensation figures were disclosed in a regulatory filing late on Friday during a difficult week for Boeing when it also released hundreds of internal messages — two major issues hanging over the company before new CEO David Calhoun starts on Monday.
The messages contained harshly critical comments about the development of the 737 MAX, including one that said the plane was “designed by clowns who in turn are supervised by monkeys.”
Lawmakers blasted Boeing on Friday.
U.S. Representative Peter DeFazio, who chairs the House Transportation Committee, said minutes of a June 2013 meeting showed that Boeing sought to avoid expensive training and simulator requirements by misleading regulators about an anti-stall system called MCAS that was later tied to the two crashes that killed 346 people.
Story continues below
The MAX has been grounded since the second crash in March.
Speculation that Muilenburg would be fired had been circulating in the industry for months, intensifying in October when the board stripped him of his chairman’s title – although he had also twice won expressions of confidence from Calhoun, Boeing’s board chairman.
A turnaround veteran and former General Electric Co executive who has led several companies in crisis, Calhoun will receive a base salary at an annual rate of $1.4 million and is eligible for $26.5 million in long-term incentive compensation, Boeing said in a filing.
Boeing said in November Muilenburg had volunteered to give up his 2019 bonus and stock awards. For 2018, his bonus and equity awards amounted to some $20 million, according to filings.
In addition to the $62 million in compensation and pension benefits, Muilenburg holds stock options that vested in 2013, Boeing said. They would be worth $18.5 million at the closing price on Friday.
“Upon his departure, Dennis received the benefits to which he was contractually entitled and he did not receive any severance pay or a 2019 annual bonus,” Boeing said in a statement.
http://torontosun.com/news/world/boe...-severance-pay
 
NZDoug
#210
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

Boeing's ousted CEO departs with $62M, even without severance pay
Reuters
Published:
January 10, 2020
Updated:
January 10, 2020 8:45 PM EST
In this file photo taken on October 29, 2019 Boeing President and Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg testifies before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on Aviation Safety and the Future of Boeings 737 MAX in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. MANDEL NGAN / AFP via Getty Images
Boeing Co’s ousted chief executive officer, Dennis Muilenburg, is leaving the company with $62 million in compensation and pension benefits but will receive no severance pay in the wake of the 737 MAX crisis.
Muilenburg was fired from the job in December as Boeing failed to contain the fallout from a pair of fatal crashes that halted output of the company’s bestselling 737 MAX jetliner and tarnished its reputation with airlines and regulators.
The compensation figures were disclosed in a regulatory filing late on Friday during a difficult week for Boeing when it also released hundreds of internal messages — two major issues hanging over the company before new CEO David Calhoun starts on Monday.
The messages contained harshly critical comments about the development of the 737 MAX, including one that said the plane was “designed by clowns who in turn are supervised by monkeys.”
Lawmakers blasted Boeing on Friday.
U.S. Representative Peter DeFazio, who chairs the House Transportation Committee, said minutes of a June 2013 meeting showed that Boeing sought to avoid expensive training and simulator requirements by misleading regulators about an anti-stall system called MCAS that was later tied to the two crashes that killed 346 people.
Story continues below
The MAX has been grounded since the second crash in March.
Speculation that Muilenburg would be fired had been circulating in the industry for months, intensifying in October when the board stripped him of his chairman’s title – although he had also twice won expressions of confidence from Calhoun, Boeing’s board chairman.
A turnaround veteran and former General Electric Co executive who has led several companies in crisis, Calhoun will receive a base salary at an annual rate of $1.4 million and is eligible for $26.5 million in long-term incentive compensation, Boeing said in a filing.
Boeing said in November Muilenburg had volunteered to give up his 2019 bonus and stock awards. For 2018, his bonus and equity awards amounted to some $20 million, according to filings.
In addition to the $62 million in compensation and pension benefits, Muilenburg holds stock options that vested in 2013, Boeing said. They would be worth $18.5 million at the closing price on Friday.
“Upon his departure, Dennis received the benefits to which he was contractually entitled and he did not receive any severance pay or a 2019 annual bonus,” Boeing said in a statement.
http://torontosun.com/news/world/boe...-severance-pay

For killing that many people, Trump should have droned him.