At least one person dead after tour vessel sinks off B.C. Coast


Twila
#31
Fishermen Ken Lucas and Clarence Smith think about what might have happened if they hadn’t seen a single flare in the sky near Plover Reefs, west of Vargas Island, on Sunday afternoon.

That flare came from the Leviathan II, a whale-watching boat operated by Jamie’s Whaling Station. The vessel had 27 people on board and capsized near Tofino around 4 p.m. Five people are confirmed dead and one person is still missing.

Lucas was dragging his fishing gear out of the water when he saw the flare in the sky.

“We pulled our gear in and we went running out to help,” he said.

As they were heading to the scene, the two members of the Ashouhat First Nation called for more help.

“Within minutes there were half-a-dozen boats, including ourselves,” said Lucas.

‘You could hear people screaming’

When Lucas and Smith arrived at the scene, they plucked three people out of the water right away.

“We got to the life-raft and the guys were pointing us in the direction [saying] ‘there’s people in the water over there’,” said Smith.

“We went to get three people in the water. One guy was clinging to the hull of the Leviathan so we picked him first. And then I heard voices a little ways away, there was two ladies, one hanging on to each other. One of them had a lifejacket, and the other one, I’m not sure if she did or not.”

“One of them was pregnant and one had a broken leg.”

Once they got the three people on their boat, the two fishermen then got the 10 people in the life-raft onto their boat as well.

Lucas said there was noise and chaos everywhere.

“You could hear people screaming on the rocks and within a few minutes that we were calling for help there was half-a-dozen boats,” he said. “We were telling the big boats to go around the rocks and the reefs where the accident happened.”

“The waves were crashing so hard, it was hard for them to hear us, but we kept pointing. ‘There’s people, people need help’.”

‘I told him ‘you’re going to be OK’

Lucas and Smith gave everyone blankets and clothes and tried to keep them warm, and said that it seems many were just clinging to life.

“They were lifeless, everybody was exhausted,” said Lucas. “Everybody was tired, nobody said a word. Everybody was shivering.”

One of the survivors was missing a shoe and his leg was entangled in fishing line. He didn’t have the energy to try and free himself.

“He had one shoe on, but his one leg was wrapped up in line, which was hung up in the boat,” said Lucas. “I was telling [Smith] this morning that if we didn’t catch that guy and take that line off his ankle, because he was so lifeless he couldn’t even swim. He was just hanging on for dear life.”

Lucas quickly asked Smith for a knife to cut the man free. “I cut the line and then he laid lifeless in the boat, he was so exhausted. He couldn’t say nothing, he couldn’t sit up. I touched his ears and his head and I rubbed his head and I told him ‘you’re going to be OK. I said ‘you’re going to be OK’.”

No distress call

“We were listening on the radio for any distress [signals], but [there were] none,” said Smith.

Lucas said he thinks the crew didn’t have a chance to call for help – everything happened too fast.

One of the crew members told him she was only able to find the one flare and set it off. “She came across one flare and she shot it off in the sky and that’s what I captured,” said Lucas. “That one flare.”

“Just a single flare that I captured, shooting in the sky.”

Jamie’s Whaling Station said, as far as they know, there was no distress call issued.

What happened?

What caused the 20-metre vessel to capsize is still not clear.

Lucas said a woman they rescued, who identified herself as a crew member, told him a wave caused the Leviathan to capsize.

“The one lady told us that they capsized from a wave. The Leviathan took a wave from the broadside, took a wave and the boat went right sideways, flipped on its side,” Lucas said.

It is still unclear who was wearing a life jacket at the time of the capsizing.

“The employees of Jamie’s didn’t have any [survival suits] on and a lot of the [tourists] had their [lifejackets] on,” said Lucas. “Nobody that was a part of the Jamie’s Whaling Station had no lifejackets on. Everybody else did.”

“Well some of them.”

The investigation continues.
‘You could hear people screaming’: Heroes recount rescuing survivors of whale-watching tragedy | Globalnews.ca
 
JLM
-1
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNick View Post

A red from Wally is a badge of honor. Usually means you said something sensible.

I think something anti conservative, anti Harper, or anti Bush will do it, oh and especially Aunty Sarah!
 
#juan
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Last info I have is that five are dead in the mishap.

My info is 5 dead and one missing. everyone crowded to one side and pushed the beam ends
under water. The mainly open boat then swallowed enough water to tip it. The safest whale watching boats
are large Zodiac type boats.
 
talloola
#34
apparently this was a large boat, people 'not' required to wear lifejackets, only in the open boats,
but of course they were available if needed, and they definitely were needed.

I was wondering if they had hit a rock, but they probably wouldn't have gone over that fast if they
hit a rock, I would think, but of course I don't know the circumstance of that mishap.
 
MHz
#35
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Is "Action" just confined to war?

As far as I know. Just because it was used in a different light doesn't make it valid. I don't see whale watching listed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missing_in_action
Missing in action (MIA) is a casualty classification assigned to armed services personnel and other combatants who are reported missing during wartime. They may have been killed, wounded, become a prisoner of war, or deserted. If deceased, neither their remains nor grave has been positively identified. Becoming MIA has been an occupational risk for as long as there has been warfare.

Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Nope just confirming you are too retarded to even be considered an idiot.

I'll bet you say that quite often when you get confronted after trying to say something that sounds cool.
 
bill barilko
+1
#36
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

....I think wearing a life jacket is a must any time you are within 10 yards of the water.

Not as safe as never leaving your house though-that's what basements are for-staying 'safe'.
 
petros
#37
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

Sorry. You must have me mistaken for your SO. There are no dart buses around here. I have a 2001 Dakota that runs just fine.

he has a bicycle
 
JLM
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilko View Post

Not as safe as never leaving your house though-that's what basements are for-staying 'safe'.

And you don't have to worry about sunburn!

Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

As far as I know. Just because it was used in a different light doesn't make it valid. I don't see whale watching listed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missing_in_action
Missing in action (MIA) is a casualty classification assigned to armed services personnel and other combatants who are reported missing during wartime. They may have been killed, wounded, become a prisoner of war, or deserted. If deceased, neither their remains nor grave has been positively identified. Becoming MIA has been an occupational risk for as long as there has been warfare.


I'll bet you say that quite often when you get confronted after trying to say something that sounds cool.

Boy, this is getting to be a matter of semantics!
 
Blackleaf
#39
The five known dead are British, with an Australian missing.

Father and son dead in Canada whale boat sinking


BBC News
27 October 2015


Marine investigator: "It is much too early to say what the causes and contributing factors of this accident might be"


Two Britons who died when a whale-watching boat sank off the coast of western Canada have been named as a father and son from Swindon, Wiltshire.

David Thomas, 50, and his son Stephen Thomas, 17, were among five Britons who died. An Australian is missing.

Stephen's mother Julie was among 21 people rescued from Leviathan II.

Officials have said more of the 27 people on board the boat could have died had it not been for the "amazing response" from locals around Tofino.

Canadian government investigators have now arrived at the scene.

The cause of the accident remains unknown but sea conditions at the time of the incident were said to be calm.



Corene Inouye, director of operations at Jamie's Whaling Station and Adventure Centre, the company that owns the boat, said: "It appears the incident happened so quickly that the crew didn't have an opportunity to send out a Mayday."

She added the skipper of the ship has more than 20 years' whale-watching experience and had completed 18 years with the company.

Company owner Jamie Bray said passengers on the boat were not required to wear life jackets as it has enclosed compartments, which would be difficult to exit in the event of a sinking.


Father and son dead in Canada whale boat sinking - BBC News
 
AnnaG
#40
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

My info is 5 dead and one missing. everyone crowded to one side and pushed the beam ends
under water. The mainly open boat then swallowed enough water to tip it.

That is what I read. Anyway, in that case, the boat was overloaded.
Quote:

The safest whale watching boats are large Zodiac type boats.

Or a houseboat type affair with wide beam and lots of outside floatation. They are pretty slow moving, though.
 
JLM
#41
I keep seeing on T.V. and reading in the news about two other accidents with the same company back in the 1900s. One had two fatalities but on a smaller different boat and the other had no fatalities. I think out of common decency to Jamie, those incidents don't need mentioning as they have absolutely nothing to do with this incident and are in no way a reflection on his character or expertise in the industry. I think he already has more than enough to contend with. Some people can be such A$$holes!
 
Twila
#42
Jameis' whale watching has had 1 other incident. And given that they're touring off the west coast of the island...


The west coast of Vancouver Island has some intense storms and the ocean is...the ocean. Unforgiving and unpredictable.

Survivors are telling of a rogue wave.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLzgzvVxUV4
 
talloola
+1
#43
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

That is what I read. Anyway, in that case, the boat was overloaded.
Or a houseboat type affair with wide beam and lots of outside floatation. They are pretty slow moving, though.

they have many rules they must adhere to, same as b.c. ferries, the boat has taken thousands of tourists
along with other boats for many years without incident, but yes, something happened, I would not believe
they were overloaded, that would totally be against the strict rules they have to follow.

Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

Survivors are telling of a rogue wave.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLzgzvVxUV4

that is possible, all of the crew is alive I believe, they will know exactly what happened,
it will all come out eventually.

these people are very trained and experienced, it isn't some fly by night operation.
 
AnnaG
#44
Well capsizing because of weight redistribution seems like a fairly plausible reason and by the looks of the draft of the boat in that picture, it is also plausible that it capsized for that reason. Shallow narrow boats are prone to capsizing. Just look at canoes and kayaks, for instance. If that is what happened, then the boat was overloaded.

You would think a 20 meter boat would be able to handle 27 people, though, especially in calm waters.
 
PoliticalNick
+1
#45
I find it hard to believe itwould capsize from people all moving to one side. That happens all the time when whales are spotted. The vessel is 65' and probably has a capcity of more than 27 people. I would have to guess it was hit broadside by a rogue wave and took on enough water to put the gunwale under.
 
MHz
#46
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

Well capsizing because of weight redistribution seems like a fairly plausible reason and by the looks of the draft of the boat in that picture, it is also plausible that it capsized for that reason. Shallow narrow boats are prone to capsizing. Just look at canoes and kayaks, for instance. If that is what happened, then the boat was overloaded.

You would think a 20 meter boat would be able to handle 27 people, though, especially in calm waters.

Perhaps tour boats that see the weigh shift from side to side as the whales move around should have outriggers like the Polynesian canoes (except it would be both sides) do and then the boat would only tip so far under any condition.

Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNick View Post

I find it hard to believe itwould capsize from people all moving to one side. That happens all the time when whales are spotted. The vessel is 65' and probably has a capcity of more than 27 people. I would have to guess it was hit broadside by a rogue wave and took on enough water to put the gunwale under.

Or a combination of the two.
 
talloola
#47
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

You would think a 20 meter boat would be able to handle 27 people, though, especially in calm waters.

yes, your last statement is correct, this isn't a small operation with careless habits, they are very
responsible, with good knowledge of their boats and exactly what they are doing, and as I stated
before strict rules, same as b.c. ferries must follow.

they haven't and aren't going to be out there with groups of people shifting from side to side in a
boat that could capsize from such movement.

my daughter and son in law both work in tofino, and are aware of the regulations
followed, and know many of the first nations who came to the rescue, as well.
 
JLM
#48
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaG View Post

Well capsizing because of weight redistribution seems like a fairly plausible reason and by the looks of the draft of the boat in that picture, it is also plausible that it capsized for that reason. Shallow narrow boats are prone to capsizing. Just look at canoes and kayaks, for instance. If that is what happened, then the boat was overloaded.

You would think a 20 meter boat would be able to handle 27 people, though, especially in calm waters.

Apparently it got hit by one of them monster waves and everyone moved to one side of the ship.