Isis

View Poll Results: Can we combine all the ISIS threads please.
Yes 13 44.83%
Why of course 5 17.24%
Yep 3 10.34%
Well I mean really, yes 8 27.59%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

Tecumsehsbones
#61
Set your clock by him.
 
Locutus
#62
The New York TimesVerified account ‏@nytimes

The only known survivor of an ISIS massacre in Iraq tells his story (warning: graphic video) http://nyti.ms/Z8GSE1



Escaping Death in Northern Iraq

Video Feature: Surviving an ISIS Massacre [includes graphic images]



http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/04/wo...w-nytimes&_r=0
 
Tecumsehsbones
#63
Interesting piece by Fareed Zakaria:

Why they still hate us, 13 years later - The Washington Post
 
Blackleaf
#64
Talking of the name "Isis"....

Isis is also the name of the part of the Thames that flows through Oxford.

It is the part of the River Thames above Iffley Lock which flows through the university city of Oxford, past Christ Church Meadow and the focal point of rowing for Oxford University.

Historically, and especially in Victorian times, gazetteers and cartographers insisted that the river Thames was correctly named the River Isis from its source until Dorchester-on-Thames , where the river meets the River Thames and becomes the "Thame-isis" (from which the Latin, or pre-Roman Celtic, name Tamesis is derived), subsequently abbreviated to Thames; current Ordnance Survey maps still label the Thames as "River Thames or Isis" until Dorchester . Since the early 20th century this distinction has been lost in common usage even in Oxford, and some historians suggest the name Isis is nothing more than part of Tamesis, the Latin name for the Thames.

The name "Isis" is especially used in the context of rowing at the University of Oxford . A number of rowing regattas are held on the Isis, including Eights Week , the most important Oxford University regatta, in the Trinity term (summer), Torpids in the Hilary term (spring) and Christ Church Regatta for novices in the Michaelmas term (autumn). Because the width of the river is restricted at Oxford, rowing eights normally have a staggered start near Donnington Bridge and must then aim to " bump " the eight in front (i.e., catch up and touch or overlap with it sufficiently). The leading eight aims to "row over" (i.e., finish the race without being bumped).


Punting on the Isis near the Botanic Gardens in Oxford, Oxfordshire


Isis is also the name of a crater on the Moon; an asteroid; the ISIS neutron source; the International Studies of Infarct Survival; a series of Canadian satellites to study the atmosphere; Isis Innovation, a British technology transfer company; a soft coral; an American post-metal band; an American horn-rock band; an Australian rock band; a character in Battlestar Galactica; a character in Stargate; an American comic book character; a1677 opera by Jean-Baptiste Lully and Philippe Quinault; a song by Bob Dylan; a song by The Yeah Yeah Yeahs; the names of three different rivers in Australia; etc etc etc etc.
 
MHz
#65
I don't see the ISIS Navy as being a match for even one of these bad boys.

 
Tecumsehsbones
-1
#66
The Empire Strikes Back

NEWPORT, Wales — The Obama administration accelerated efforts Friday to build an international coalition to combat the Islamic State, winning pledges of support from nine allies but leaving questions about the extent of possible expanded military force.

Secretary of State John F. Kerry said the multinational alliance possesses ``the ability to destroy’’ the militants using tactics that stretch beyond the battlefield such as trying to disrupt its recruiting and financial networks.

“It may take a year, it may take two years, it may take three years. But we’re determined. It has to happen,” he said at the end of a two-day NATO summit in Wales.

The 10-nation alliance, forged at the NATO meeting, would expand efforts to arm and train Iraqi government forces and Kurdish fighters battling the Islamic State. The group would also further coordinate operations to deliver humanitarian aid to refugees who fled as the Islamic State’s gained ground in northern Iraq and parts of Syria.

* * * * *

Britain, France and Australia are considered the most likely allies to possibly join the United States in more aggressive airstrike campaigns against the Islamic State — at least in Iraq. France and Australia both have military outposts in the United Arab Emirates. Britain has a military base in Cyprus in the eastern Mediterranean.

Philip Hammond, Britain’s foreign secretary, said his country had “made no commitment to take part in any air strikes as yet, but we’ll certainly consider that possibility.”

U.S. officials, meanwhile, are pressing other NATO members to provide support in different ways, including providing weapons and ammunition for Kurdish fighters and sharing intelligence about the Islamic State -- which has drawn thousands of foreign fighters from Europe, North Africa, the United States and elsewhere.

NATO allies unite against Islamic State - The Washington Post

The U.S., Britain, France, and Australia will carry the load. How 'bout those superior Canadian forces?

I calculate we'll call them to deliver the critical canoes and maple syrup.
 
MHz
#67
Is this the surrender list after ISIS kicks our collective butt and Russia get away? That's not a very happy ending, justice might be served but somewhat unhappy for the locals of NA just the same, till day 2 then fresh air sweeps the cobwebs away so being isolated from Europe is a bad thing because Europe has been at peace for the last 1,000 years right? Not, and the jostling isn't over by any means. The biggest task is getting people to realize that 300M living by recycling the past results in something better is the hardest part of change. The Great Lakes should be for fish products only, boat products can use the roads to carry the containers.

Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

maple syrup.

In your pocket a soft mess, shape it and let the cold do itr's thing and you have ninja throwing stars or a nice light snack should you have to put in some overtime.
 
BaalsTears
#68
Obama just killed a leader of the Somali terrorist group Al Shabaab. I suspect Al Shabaab will respond with a terrorist attack in Minneapolis.
 
EagleSmack
#69
Quote: Originally Posted by BaalsTears View Post

Obama just killed a leader of the Somali terrorist group Al Shabaab. I suspect Al Shabaab will respond with a terrorist attack in Minneapolis.

The Gopher State!

Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Is this the surrender list after ISIS kicks our collective butt and Russia get away? That's not a very happy ending, justice might be served but somewhat unhappy for the locals of NA just the same, till day 2 then fresh air sweeps the cobwebs away so being isolated from Europe is a bad thing because Europe has been at peace for the last 1,000 years right? Not, and the jostling isn't over by any means. The biggest task is getting people to realize that 300M living by recycling the past results in something better is the hardest part of change. The Great Lakes should be for fish products only, boat products can use the roads to carry the containers.


In your pocket a soft mess, shape it and let the cold do itr's thing and you have ninja throwing stars or a nice light snack should you have to put in some overtime.

Should the trees barter to the carpet over corral round drawers? Beware of jumping tool box for the color swim.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#70
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

The Gopher State!



Should the trees barter to the carpet over corral round drawers? Beware of jumping tool box for the color swim.

Easy for YOU to say!
 
MHz
#71
He was funnier when he posted pics.
 
EagleSmack
+1
#72
Odd... a coherent sentence. Very strange.
 
MHz
#73

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8oUgFcPeNk0&list=WL
Last edited by MHz; Sep 5th, 2014 at 01:07 PM..
 
Locutus
#74
ISIS ‘Tough Guys’ Get Caught, Then Cry And Whimper

video win:

WATCH: ISIS 'Tough Guys' Get Caught, Then Cry And Whimper
 
MHz
#75
Which army wears running shoes?
Which army doesn't wear any uniforms but does like leather car coats? foreign rebels who steal their uniforms. Keeping the Hummers out of the headlines is a wise move, lol Woman behind the flag carrier, equal opportunity employer is good, evening might be a dicey time for she if she wasn't one of the Commanders.

Last edited by MHz; Sep 5th, 2014 at 05:02 PM..
 
petros
+1 / -1
#76
ISIS is a refreshing break from Evangelical born yesterday snake charming moonbats.
 
MHz
#77
Quite right, notice the ones that scream democracy the loudest are the ones who look for loopholes the hardest.
I hope the world learned that 'once off the rails' you don't just back on all by yourself, sometimes you need something equal to a breath of fresh air because that won't help all the ones here who have been getting enough of that stuff. You would be surprised what little goodies are hidden in those UN documents. (no that they were ever expected to be opened so the words are quite good as far as 'what needs to be changed so the serfs have the same rights as the (former) Queen of England who now runs an above board boarding school for disadvantaged children of the brown persuasion, like 100,00 for summer camp.
 
Goober
#78
ISIL has a single focus, ignite sectarian war, divide people along religious lines. Once the divisions have been laid as they have in Iraq, the trust is gone. Neighbor turning in old family friends to ISIL.
Then we have the Righteous, those Sunni Muslims that smuggled out families thru ISIL lines to safety. If they were caught their families would have been slaughtered.
This type of threat needs to be attacked. Not only by Western countries but by those countries in the ME, and that also means a change in looking upon, Shia or Sunni as heretics and stopping the discrimination, mock trials and all that goes with that. A come to Allah moment that if not acted upon will only assist ISIL in gaining more recruits.
 
MHz
#79
If ISIS was to take control of all of Iraq the US and usual suspects would totally accept that as being just fine if it lasted 40 years without an election. The model for the locals, all locals under the NATO flag, is Saudi and Bahrain in their present form, no matter what the brochure says. If that was such a decent rule the University students in Iran would not have revolted in '79.
 
Walter
#80
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

If ISIS was to take control of all of Iraq the US and usual suspects would totally accept that as being just fine if it lasted 40 years without an election. The model for the locals, all locals under the NATO flag, is Saudi and Bahrain in their present form, no matter what the brochure says. If that was such a decent rule the University students in Iran would not have revolted in '79.

They revolted in '09, too.
 
petros
#81
Quote: Originally Posted by Goober View Post

ISIL has a single focus, ignite sectarian war, divide people along religious lines. Once the divisions have been laid as they have in Iraq, the trust is gone. Neighbor turning in old family friends to ISIL.
Then we have the Righteous, those Sunni Muslims that smuggled out families thru ISIL lines to safety. If they were caught their families would have been slaughtered.
This type of threat needs to be attacked. Not only by Western countries but by those countries in the ME, and that also means a change in looking upon, Shia or Sunni as heretics and stopping the discrimination, mock trials and all that goes with that. A come to Allah moment that if not acted upon will only assist ISIL in gaining more recruits.

They did a bang up job of stopping the IIS pipeline which only benefits Israel and US/Canadian interests in Lebanon.
 
MHz
#82
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

They revolted in '09, too.

Did you miss the part about them not needing any revolt if not for the 'help' of the Us and the usual suspects?
 
BaalsTears
#83
A member of the Democratic Party is running a slick media campaign for ISIS.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...nted-list.html
Last edited by BaalsTears; Sep 6th, 2014 at 12:36 AM..
 
gopher
+1
#84
Iran Offers US Aid in Fighting ISIS; US Rejects It -- News from Antiwar.com


Iran Offers US Aid in Fighting ISIS; US Rejects It

US Rules Out Coordination, Information Sharing With Iran







The Iranian government made a huge move toward rapprochement today, with Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei saying that he approved of cooperation with the United States in fighting ISIS, and that he had already authorized the Iranian military to coordinate with the US, as well as Iraqi and Kurdish forces in the fight.
Iran views ISIS as a major threat, and the group is actively fighting wars against two of their key allies, Iraq and Syria, and forming a nation out of those territories quite successfully. As ISIS gets closer to the Iranian border, the nation is more willing to work with any possible allies in countering the Islamists’ expansion.
Offers for rapprochement are rare, but the US reaction is common: outright rejection. The State Department insisted that the US was neither going to do any coordination with Iran, nor even share information on their operations.
The US has made it clear they want to insinuate themselves into the ISIS war in a big way, and assemble a massive “coalition of the willing” for the war, though they likewise have been unwilling to accept the most likely such allies, Iran and Syria, because of a longstanding policy of hostility toward those nations.














Iran has been a stabilizing force in the ME. Good thing neither McCain nor Romney invaded it like they wanted to do.
 
petros
#85
Iran already has troops in Baghdad.

Iran, Iraq, Syria sign major gas pipeline deal - Tehran Times

Does blocking this pipeline benefit Israel, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and Qatar who are all US allies?
 
gopher
+1
#86
An American explains why he joined ISIS and says its idealism parallels American ideals to some extent:


I understand why Westerners are joining jihadi movements like ISIS. I was almost one of them. - The Washington Post



The Islamic State just released a gruesome new beheading video, again helmed by a western-bred Jihadist. As often happens, I received messages asking for explanation.

You see, I’m the jihadi who never was.

Twenty years ago, I ditched my Catholic high school in upstate New York to study at a Saudi-funded madrassa in Pakistan. A fresh convert, I jumped at the chance to live at a mosque and study Qur’an all day.

This was in the mid-1990s, during an escalation of the Chechen resistance against Russian rule. After class, we’d turn on the television and watch feeds of destruction and suffering. The videos were upsetting. So upsetting that soon I found myself thinking about abandoning my religious education to pick up a gun and fight for Chechen freedom.

It wasn’t a verse I’d read in our Qur’an study circles that made me want to fight, but rather my American values. I had grown up in the Reagan ’80s. I learned from G.I. Joe cartoons to (in the words of the theme song) “fight for freedom, wherever there’s trouble.” I assumed that individuals had the right — and the duty — to intervene anywhere on the planet where they perceived threats to freedom, justice and equality.

For me, wanting to go to Chechnya wasn’t reducible to my “Muslim rage” or “hatred for the West.” This may be hard to believe, but I thought about the war in terms of compassion. Like so many Americans moved by their love of country to serve in the armed forces, I yearned to fight oppression and protect the safety and dignity of others. I believed that this world was in bad shape. I placed my faith in somewhat magical solutions claiming that the world could be fixed by a renewal of authentic Islam and a truly Islamic system of government. But I also believed that working toward justice was more valuable than my own life.

Eventually, I decided to stay in Islamabad. And the people who eventually convinced me not to fight weren’t the kinds of Muslims propped up in the media as liberal, West-friendly reformers. They were deeply conservative; some would call them “intolerant.” In the same learning environment in which I was told that my non-Muslim mother would burn in eternal hellfire, I was also told that I could achieve more good in the world as a scholar than as a soldier, and that I should strive to be more than a body in a ditch. These traditionalists reminded me of Muhammad’s statement that the ink of scholars was holier than the blood of martyrs.

The media often draw a clear line between our imagined categories of “good” and “bad” Muslims. My brothers in Pakistan would have made that division much more complicated than some could imagine.These men whom I perceived as superheroes of piety, speaking to me as the authorized voice of the tradition itself, said that violence was not the best that I could offer.

Some kids in my situation seem to have received different advice.

It’s easy to assume that religious people, particularly Muslims, simply do things because their religions tell them to. But when I think about my impulse at age 17 to run away and become a fighter for the Chechen rebels, I consider more than religious factors. My imagined scenario of liberating Chechnya and turning it into an Islamic state was a purely American fantasy, grounded in American ideals and values. Whenever I hear of an American who flies across the globe to throw himself into freedom struggles that are not his own, I think, What a very, very American thing to do.

And that’s the problem. We are raised to love violence and view military conquest as a benevolent act. The American kid who wants to intervene in another nation’s civil war owes his worldview as much to American exceptionalism as to jihadist interpretations of scripture. I grew up in a country that glorifies military sacrifice and feels entitled to rebuild other societies according to its own vision. I internalized these values before ever thinking about religion. Before I even knew what a Muslim was, let alone concepts such as “jihad” or an “Islamic state,” my American life had taught me that that’s what brave men do.
 
pgs
#87
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

An American explains why he joined ISIS and says its idealism parallels American ideals to some extent:


I understand why Westerners are joining jihadi movements like ISIS. I was almost one of them. - The Washington Post



The Islamic State just released a gruesome new beheading video, again helmed by a western-bred Jihadist. As often happens, I received messages asking for explanation.

You see, I’m the jihadi who never was.

Twenty years ago, I ditched my Catholic high school in upstate New York to study at a Saudi-funded madrassa in Pakistan. A fresh convert, I jumped at the chance to live at a mosque and study Qur’an all day.

This was in the mid-1990s, during an escalation of the Chechen resistance against Russian rule. After class, we’d turn on the television and watch feeds of destruction and suffering. The videos were upsetting. So upsetting that soon I found myself thinking about abandoning my religious education to pick up a gun and fight for Chechen freedom.

It wasn’t a verse I’d read in our Qur’an study circles that made me want to fight, but rather my American values. I had grown up in the Reagan ’80s. I learned from G.I. Joe cartoons to (in the words of the theme song) “fight for freedom, wherever there’s trouble.” I assumed that individuals had the right — and the duty — to intervene anywhere on the planet where they perceived threats to freedom, justice and equality.

For me, wanting to go to Chechnya wasn’t reducible to my “Muslim rage” or “hatred for the West.” This may be hard to believe, but I thought about the war in terms of compassion. Like so many Americans moved by their love of country to serve in the armed forces, I yearned to fight oppression and protect the safety and dignity of others. I believed that this world was in bad shape. I placed my faith in somewhat magical solutions claiming that the world could be fixed by a renewal of authentic Islam and a truly Islamic system of government. But I also believed that working toward justice was more valuable than my own life.

Eventually, I decided to stay in Islamabad. And the people who eventually convinced me not to fight weren’t the kinds of Muslims propped up in the media as liberal, West-friendly reformers. They were deeply conservative; some would call them “intolerant.” In the same learning environment in which I was told that my non-Muslim mother would burn in eternal hellfire, I was also told that I could achieve more good in the world as a scholar than as a soldier, and that I should strive to be more than a body in a ditch. These traditionalists reminded me of Muhammad’s statement that the ink of scholars was holier than the blood of martyrs.

The media often draw a clear line between our imagined categories of “good” and “bad” Muslims. My brothers in Pakistan would have made that division much more complicated than some could imagine.These men whom I perceived as superheroes of piety, speaking to me as the authorized voice of the tradition itself, said that violence was not the best that I could offer.

Some kids in my situation seem to have received different advice.

It’s easy to assume that religious people, particularly Muslims, simply do things because their religions tell them to. But when I think about my impulse at age 17 to run away and become a fighter for the Chechen rebels, I consider more than religious factors. My imagined scenario of liberating Chechnya and turning it into an Islamic state was a purely American fantasy, grounded in American ideals and values. Whenever I hear of an American who flies across the globe to throw himself into freedom struggles that are not his own, I think, What a very, very American thing to do.

And that’s the problem. We are raised to love violence and view military conquest as a benevolent act. The American kid who wants to intervene in another nation’s civil war owes his worldview as much to American exceptionalism as to jihadist interpretations of scripture. I grew up in a country that glorifies military sacrifice and feels entitled to rebuild other societies according to its own vision. I internalized these values before ever thinking about religion. Before I even knew what a Muslim was, let alone concepts such as “jihad” or an “Islamic state,” my American life had taught me that that’s what brave men do.

Good go join him if you haven't already .
 
Zipperfish
#88
I don't want to be a jihadi... I want to come home': How dozens of British Muslims who went to Syria to join ISIS 'plead to return to UK after becoming disillusioned with the conflict'

Quote:

British jihadis fighting in Syria want to come home after becoming disillusioned with the conflict, it emerged today.
In the last three years, more than 500 radicalised Britons are believed to have headed out to the war-torn country, where Islamist groups are fighting President Bashar Assad's forces.

But some of those who signed up to fight have now contacted authorities in Britain saying they have had enough of the war-zone and want to return home, it was reported today.

more at link.

Well they all burnd their passports but now the poor little babies want to come home.
 
BaalsTears
#89
I hope Iran and ISIS bleed each other to death. However, the US should avoid involvement with the fuzzy wuzzies.
 
gopher
+1
#90
Arm chair warriors beware - Immigrants A 'Greater Threat' Than ISIS



Republican Pat Buchanan warned that immigration and the resulting “decomposition of this country socially, culturally, politically” is more of a danger to the U.S. than the terrorists of ISIS.

“Look, we’d better realize here that the United States itself is in tremendous long-term danger, I think, and the bleeding border along our southern border, the mass movement of people from all over the world into this country, the decomposition of this country socially and culturally, politically, all of these things, it seems to me, are far greater long-term threats to the United States than even those dreadful characters over there in Syria or Iraq beheading people,” Buchanan said in audio.

Buchanan went on to echo Phyllis Schlafly’s warning that new immigrants will largely vote Democratic, thereby destroying America.



Pat Buchanan: Immigrants A Greater Threat Than ISIS | Right Wing Watch
 

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