Vancouver's 'dirty little secret'


talloola
#31
Quote: Originally Posted by sanctus View Post

By Heather Alexander
BBC News, Vancouver, Canada
Thousands of people visit Vancouver each year. Surrounded by snow-capped mountains, it is described in brochures as one of the world's most spectacular cities.
But mention a trip to the downtown Eastside and you get: "Don't go there."


"Make sure you stay away from alleyways." The area is known as the city's "dirty little secret" - a "hidden ghetto" where drug deals take place openly on the streets.
And dozens of women who worked the streets there were murdered.
Marnie Frey went missing in 1997.
A friend of hers came to the first day of the trial of Robert Pickton, who is accused of murdering 26 women - all prostitutes and drug addicts - who disappeared over a period of more than a decade.
Marnie Frey's friend said Marnie went out one day and never came back.
Police failings
She was one of over 60 women who went missing from the area in the 1980s and 1990s - and it wasn't something that was going unnoticed by the people of Vancouver.
"There have been so many rumours about missing women for so long... it was constantly in the paper," a local called Joanne told me.



In the case of the missing women, we don't have a suspect - in fact we don't have a crime
Police statement in 1999
She was first in line in the court queue that first day, with a friend. Both doubted the police had done their utmost to solve the disappearances when they began.
"The police weren't taking it seriously. I guess in retrospect they were making excuses," the women said.
When officers did start investigating - over a decade after the first women disappeared - they admitted they were baffled.
In 1999, one constable told local channel Citynews: "In the case of the missing women, we don't have a suspect. In fact we don't have a crime."
Two years later they said: "We don't have any leads like crime scenes to help us uncover more facts."
Mental hospitals
The women were nearly all drug-addicted prostitutes.
Many think that is the real reason nothing was done.
Mental health worker Patricia Hanley says she saw many of her clients disappear.
"You'd meet with one and she'd be worried about a missing friend, then she'd go missing herself."
She says the deterioration of Vancouver's downtown Eastside is directly related to the gradual closure of one of the area's mental hospitals.
Riverview used to house more than 4,000 patients. Now the number is in the hundreds.
Ms Hanley says residents ended up living on the streets, getting money for crack through the sex trade.
'People cared'
In his opening statement, prosecutor Derrill Prevett told the jury not to be swayed by the victims' involvement with drugs and prostitution.
"Regardless of their lifestyle... each of the women had people and places that were important to them and people who cared about them."


This is the first of two trials Robert "Willie" Pickton faces over the missing women - he faces six murder charges this time. There is no dispute from defence that their remains did end up at the Pickton farm.
A jawbone is all that is left of Marnie Frey.
But they do say Robert Pickton did not put the bodies there - pointing to the large number of people who had access to the property.
It is likely to be at least a year before the jury decides its verdict.
Patricia Hanley hopes the trial will mean more is done to clean up the Eastside long before that.

Pickton doesn't live in Vancouver, he came there to do his dirty deeds, he could have done that
anywhere.
 
karrie
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by talloola View Post

Pickton doesn't live in Vancouver, he came there to do his dirty deeds, he could have done that
anywhere.

Does that distinction really matter?
 
Unforgiven
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by bluecollarguy View Post

It is attitudes and ideas like this that helped drive some of these people to were they are.
Not all the people down there are there by choice. Many institutions have been closed and the residents removed with no way to help themselves and very little support system.
And as for the drugs. All it can take is one bad choice in life and things change forever.
These people may or may not have chosen this live but they still deserve our help and protection if they want or need it.
Just my $.02

I wonder about people who feel the need to get a kick in on those who are down on their luck. People have problems and while I don't have any qualms about laying the boots to someone who through their own actions has and continues to cause problems that directly affect others around them, those who simply are crushing and consuming themselves trapped within addiction or mental illness need help and someone to care about them actively trying to bring them round to a stable lifestyle via methods of harm reduction. Not punishment.
 
MikeyDB
#34
I don't care what city it is or what province it's in....

Canadians are responsible for tolerating the situation that gives life to these horrendous conditions for the less fortunate and the substance abuser.

With our Prime Minister making deals with Columbia and Afghanistan, with this "reformed" position on "terrorism", how does he and how do Canadians synthesize the situation wherein we have a serious drug problem...across Canada not just in BC.....our RCMP seems unable to cope with very much of anything....including their own pension fund.....and a terrorist like Picton can cost Canadian taxpayers millions......

Oh I forgot....

Canadians just keep quiet and don't make a fuss.....

It's the Canadian way to let criminals run free and governments ignore if not abet the drug industry...

Sure now and then we'll bust someone for a joint or two, or raise a helluva rukus when some nutbar uses a gun in his/her criminal act....but hey if it's OK with Canada's government to do business with cocaine and heroin central....I supppose these are just insignificant blips on the radar....

We all must surely understand that while there's money to be made....the adopted American virtue that our current Prime Minister embraces....hey the results and the impact of lawlessness organized crime and failed policing....well.....what could be more Canadian?
 
jjaycee98
#35
Quote: Originally Posted by Pangloss View Post

Not to be picky folks but it's the DOWNTOWN EASTSIDE.

Also, while a simple, stupid idea like "bulldozing the area" might appeal to those who have never known the joy of sleeping on a sidewalk, could anyone here please tell me where the poor folk who live in these low-income hotel/apartments will live after you raze their neighbourhood?

Advocates for the poor and homeless, like The Downtown Eastdide Residents' Association, fight every day to save the very hotels and neighbourhoods you would so callously destroy.

Maybe they know something you don't.

Pangloss

Something in the NEWS about revamping those worth doing and replacing a number in some locations to provide residences for people involved in the Olympics. Also was stated that some of these will be "low cost housing" after the Olympics.

Huge hue and cry about no place for the folks down there to go. So the next to the worst neighbourhood will probably receive flow.

In Calgary a huge area has been gutted to provide a "revitalized" neighbourhood adjacent to the Stampede grounds. The City bought out about 8 sq blocks of old houses and most have been torn down, with only a couple with Historic value being saved. Also a few old Mercantile and Manufacturing buildings have been saved to convert to trendy restaurants and shops.

I'm sure it was hard on many people to be uprooted. The whole thing is "Justified" by other neighbourhoods absorbing them and supposedly their lot is marginally better.
 
MikeyDB
#36
Not in my Backyard.....

Territoriality call of the red-crested Canadian.....
 
Minority Observer84
#37
Quote: Originally Posted by Pangloss View Post

Not to be picky folks but it's the DOWNTOWN EASTSIDE.

Also, while a simple, stupid idea like "bulldozing the area" might appeal to those who have never known the joy of sleeping on a sidewalk, could anyone here please tell me where the poor folk who live in these low-income hotel/apartments will live after you raze their neighbourhood?

They should crawl into a hole and die because they do not fit mainstream society of course .
 
talloola
#38
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

Does that distinction really matter?

The point was made that the Vancouver east end was the cause of pickton doing what he did,
and pickton was the cause of doing what he did.

The Vancouver east end has problems and should be improved, but what he did is 100% his fault,
not the fault of any 'area', and the two points should be kept separate, as it seems to soften what
he did, and partially blame the area for letting it happen. No so.
 
talloola
#39
Quote: Originally Posted by tamarin View Post

I've never been west of Ontario. I will some day. Maybe. Never felt the draw. But I have heard of its sin capitals. Vancouver and Winnipeg have been in the news since - as some hippie chick once chirped -"forever!" I love small town Ontario. There are problems there but nothing blatant and numbing as found out west.


Fix your weather, and watch the change.
 
karrie
#40
Quote: Originally Posted by talloola View Post

The point was made that the Vancouver east end was the cause of pickton doing what he did,
and pickton was the cause of doing what he did.

The Vancouver east end has problems and should be improved, but what he did is 100% his fault,
not the fault of any 'area', and the two points should be kept separate, as it seems to soften what
he did, and partially blame the area for letting it happen. No so.

Of course it partially blames the area for letting it happen. Of course it does. Pickton could never have walked into, let's say Bezanson Alberta, and preyed on women for the better part of ten years, before someone saw what was happening, saw him, saw the women in question, and put it all together. Of course the city is partly to blame for turning a blind eye and not watching its citizens as closely as any other town would. It's not unique to Van, but it IS unique to large cities. He couldn't have pulled off such a long killing spree without the indifference of a populace.
 
Twila
#41
Quote:

Totally agree that if these women had been Sunday School teachers or members of the local women's university club, more would have been done sooner.

One mustn't forget the transient nature of drug addicted prostitutes. Some will have moved to other cities. At least that is the view of the police force who sees many prostitues being run from one city to another by pimps who keep them moving.
 
talloola
#42
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

Of course it partially blames the area for letting it happen. Of course it does. Pickton could never have walked into, let's say Bezanson Alberta, and preyed on women for the better part of ten years, before someone saw what was happening, saw him, saw the women in question, and put it all together. Of course the city is partly to blame for turning a blind eye and not watching its citizens as closely as any other town would. It's not unique to Van, but it IS unique to large cities. He couldn't have pulled off such a long killing spree without the indifference of a populace.

I'll just repeat my thoughts, Pickton would have found his victims 'wherever' he could have, he is a
very deranged killer. Those people find their prey.

Ted Bundy, The Green River killer, all totally responsible for their crimes, not the areas they
came to, to collect their women.

Vancouver will take the rap for him because it happened there. Prostitutes will be in other areas, if they can't be there, he would have found them anywhere he wanted to.

Yes, they should clean up.
Keep the incidents separate, because they are.

We'll have to agree to disagree on this one, now, on to other things.
 
spaminator
#43
Serial killer Robert Pickton transferred to Quebec: victim's family
Canadian Press
More from Canadian Press
Published:
June 24, 2018
Updated:
June 24, 2018 4:36 PM EDT
Notorious serial killer and pig farmer Robert Pickton has been transferred to a maximum-security prison in Quebec, the family of the one of his victims said Sunday.
Joyce Lachance, whose niece Marnie Frey was one of six women whom Pickton was convicted of killing, said she received a phone call from Correctional Services Canada on Thursday, notifying her that Pickton had been transferred that day.
She said she was told he was transferred from Kent Institution in Agassiz, B.C., for his protection and so that he could access different programs at the Port-Cartier Institution, about 600 kilometres northeast of Quebec City.
Lachance said she is unhappy the family wasn’t contacted prior to the transfer and that other family members still had not received official notification of the move.
“They are angry because they have not gotten a phone call. Why were they left out? That is awful,” she said.
The person who called told her said she would be receiving a letter soon in the mail confirming the transfer, Lachance said.
She also said she is concerned that if Pickton comes up for parole, it will be more difficult for victims’ family members to make the trip across the country to participate in his parole hearing.
Rick Frey, Marnie Frey’s father, said he’s disappointed that he hasn’t been notified. He said the family has had enough to deal with since his daughter’s disappearance in 1997, and every time Pickton’s name comes up again, it just “stirs the pot.”
“It’s just been a nightmare from day one,” Rick Frey said.
Correctional Service Canada said in a statement that it could not comment on a specific case or disclose the location of a federal offender due to the Privacy Act.
“The safety and security of staff and inmates are paramount when making decisions about inmate accommodation. Transfers are made to manage security requirements within an institution,” it said in a statement.
Pickton was arrested in February 2002 and convicted of six counts of second-degree murder in December 2007. The remains or DNA of 33 women were found on Pickton’s property in Port Coquitlam, B.C.
Serial killer Robert Pickton transferred to Quebec: victim’s family | Toronto Sun
 

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