Prince Charles at 60: What are your memories of him? Have you ever met the Prince of


CBC News
#1
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scratch
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by CBC News View Post

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Not one thing of substance. Pure `example` of useless royalty.
 
Risus
#3
He had a hot wife once....
 
Blackleaf
#4
Yeah, he's "useless". So "useless" that in 1976 he founded the Prince's Trust, a charity to help Britain's young people.

The young people helped by The Prince's Trust are the long-term unemployed, people who have been in trouble with the law, people who are in difficulty at school, and people who have been in care. These young people are considered by the Prince's Trust to have a "disadvantaged background" and are generally referred to by The Prince's Trust as being "disadvantaged. The Prince is president of the organisation, and it employs 688 people, 615 who work in charitable purposes.

He says that when he becomes King, he will not rename it The King's Trust but keep it as The Prince's Trust and will ensure that Prince William, who will then become Prince of Wales, will take charge of it.



The Prince's Trust has six main types of charitable activity.
  • The Business Programme helps young people start a business.
  • The Team Programme is a 12-week personal development course, offering work experience, practical skills, community projects and a residential week.
  • Get Intos are short courses offering training and experience in a specific sector to help young people get a job.
  • Development Awards are small grants to enable people to access education, training or work.
  • Community Cash Awards are grants to help young people set up a project that will benefit their community.
  • xl clubs are held in schools.
The Business Programme is the programme for which the Prince’s Trust is best known and it helps young people start a business. A young person can benefit from the program if they are aged 18 to 30, are unemployed or working less than 16 hours a week. If they are in an unsatisfying low paid job they will need to become long term unemployed before they can be helped.

The help provided usually consists of a loan of up to £4,000, which needs to be repaid by the young person togther with 3% interest.

Each year young people pay the Prince's Trust around £360,000 in interest payments on their loans. Ongoing advice is also provided for three years by a business mentor who is a Prince's Trust volunteer.

On repayment of their loan, Business Programme participants have the opportunity to join The Prince's Trust Business Club. This is a free-to-join business networking group exclusively for those who have been supported by The Trust's Business Programme.

Prince Charles also shares his views on topics which are close to his heart: architecture, urban planning, the environment, inner city renewal and the improvement of the qulity of life of the British people. He is a well-known Green campaigner.

He is known to be an advocate of neo-traditional ideas, such as those of Christopher Alexander and Leon Krier, which were illustrated in his 1984 attack on the British architectural community in a speech given to the Royal Institute of British Architects, describing a proposed extension to the National Gallery in London as a "monstrous carbuncle". Charles also published a book and created a documentary entitled A Vision for Britain, which critiqued some aspects of modern architecture.

Despite criticism from the professional architectural press, the Prince has continued to put forward his views, stressing traditional urbanism, the need for human scale, and the restoration of historic buildings as an integrated element of new development and sustainable design. Two of the Charles' charities in particular forward his theories on design: The Prince's Regeneration Trust (formed by a merger of Regeneration Through Heritage and the Phoenix Trust in 2006) and The Prince's Foundation for the Built Environment (which absorbed The Prince of Wales's Institute of Architecture in 2001). Further, the village of Poundbury was created at the instigation of Prince Charles, with a master plan by Krier.

Charles assisted with the establishment of a National Trust for the built environment in Canada, after lamenting, in 1996, the unbridled destruction of many of the country's historic urban cores. He offered his assistance to the Department of Canadian Heritage in the creation of a trust modelled on the British variant, and, with the passing of the 2007 federal budget by his mother's representative in Canada, a Canadian national trust was finally fully implemented.

In 1999, the Prince also agreed to offer the use of his title to the Prince of Wales Prize for Municipal Heritage Leadership, awarded by the Heritage Canada Foundation to municipal governments that have shown sustained commitment to the conservation of historic places.

Charles has also been the recipient of awards for his efforts in regard to architecture, such as the National Building Museum's Vincent Scully Prize he received in 2005, while visiting the United States and touring southern Mississippi and New Orleans to survey the damage caused by Hurricane Katrina; he donated $25,000 of the prize money to help restore communities damaged by the storm.

Starting in 1997, the Prince of Wales also visited Romania to view and draw attention to some of the destruction caused during the Communist rule of Nicolae Ceauşescu, particularly Orthodox monasteries and Saxon villages of Transylvania, where he purchased a house.

Charles also became patron of two Romanian built environment organisations: the Mihai Eminescu Trust and the International Network for Traditional Building, Architecture, and Urbanism), an advocate of architecture that respects cultural tradition and identity.

source: wikipedia

So Prince Charles has done a lot for this country so far, including helping its disadvantaged young people, give advice on issues such as the environment, urban planning and the improvement of people's quality of life and is also the patron of many, many charities.

Far from sitting on his butt doing nothing all day, Charles is, in fact, serving his country proudly, as we saw on the brilliant BBC documentary last night. The documentary showed the Prince visiting the town of Burnley, in Lancashire, a former cotton-spinning town during the Industrial Revolution. Nowadays, it has one of the country's highest unemployment rates and one of its lowest standard of living. Charles met with several of the town's leaders and other notables and he gave some of his advice onto how to solve the town's economic problems and quality of life.

The Queen is also a great Head of State, always does her duty to serve her country even at the grand age of 82 and is infinitely more adored and respected around the world than any president of any republic is.
Last edited by Blackleaf; Nov 13th, 2008 at 11:51 AM..
 
scratch
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Yeah, he's "useless". So "useless" that in 1976 he founded the Prince's Trust, a charity to help Britain's young people.

The young people helped by The Prince's Trust are the long-term unemployed, people who have been in trouble with the law, people who are in difficulty at school, and people who have been in care. These young people are considered by the Prince's Trust to have a "disadvantaged background" and are generally referred to by The Prince's Trust as being "disadvantaged. The Prince is president of the organisation, and it employs 688 people, 615 who work in charitable purposes.

He says that when he becomes King, he will not rename it The King's Trust but keep it as The Prince's Trust and will ensure that Prince William, who will then become Prince of Wales, will take charge of it.


The Prince's Trust has six main types of charitable activity.

  • The Business Programme helps young people start a business.
  • The Team Programme is a 12-week personal development course, offering work experience, practical skills, community projects and a residential week.
  • Get Intos are short courses offering training and experience in a specific sector to help young people get a job.
  • Development Awards are small grants to enable people to access education, training or work.
  • Community Cash Awards are grants to help young people set up a project that will benefit their community.
  • xl clubs are held in schools.
The Business Programme is the programme for which the Prince’s Trust is best known and it helps young people start a business. A young person can benefit from the program if they are aged 18 to 30, are unemployed or working less than 16 hours a week. If they are in an unsatisfying low paid job they will need to become long term unemployed before they can be helped.

The help provided usually consists of a loan of up to £4,000, which needs to be repaid by the young person togther with 3% interest.

Each year young people pay the Prince's Trust around £360,000 in interest payments on their loans. Ongoing advice is also provided for three years by a business mentor who is a Prince's Trust volunteer.

On repayment of their loan, Business Programme participants have the opportunity to join The Prince's Trust Business Club. This is a free-to-join business networking group exclusively for those who have been supported by The Trust's Business Programme.

Prince Charles also shares his views on topics which are close to his heart: architecture, urban planning, the environment, inner city renewal and the improvement of the qulity of life of the British people. He is a well-known Green campaigner.

He is known to be an advocate of neo-traditional ideas, such as those of Christopher Alexander and Leon Krier, which were illustrated in his 1984 attack on the British architectural community in a speech given to the Royal Institute of British Architects, describing a proposed extension to the National Gallery in London as a "monstrous carbuncle". Charles also published a book and created a documentary entitled A Vision for Britain, which critiqued some aspects of modern architecture.

Despite criticism from the professional architectural press, the Prince has continued to put forward his views, stressing traditional urbanism, the need for human scale, and the restoration of historic buildings as an integrated element of new development and sustainable design. Two of the Charles' charities in particular forward his theories on design: The Prince's Regeneration Trust (formed by a merger of Regeneration Through Heritage and the Phoenix Trust in 2006) and The Prince's Foundation for the Built Environment (which absorbed The Prince of Wales's Institute of Architecture in 2001). Further, the village of Poundbury was created at the instigation of Prince Charles, with a master plan by Krier.

Charles assisted with the establishment of a National Trust for the built environment in Canada, after lamenting, in 1996, the unbridled destruction of many of the country's historic urban cores. He offered his assistance to the Department of Canadian Heritage in the creation of a trust modelled on the British variant, and, with the passing of the 2007 federal budget by his mother's representative in Canada, a Canadian national trust was finally fully implemented.

In 1999, the Prince also agreed to offer the use of his title to the Prince of Wales Prize for Municipal Heritage Leadership, awarded by the Heritage Canada Foundation to municipal governments that have shown sustained commitment to the conservation of historic places.

Charles has also been the recipient of awards for his efforts in regard to architecture, such as the National Building Museum's Vincent Scully Prize he received in 2005, while visiting the United States and touring southern Mississippi and New Orleans to survey the damage caused by Hurricane Katrina; he donated $25,000 of the prize money to help restore communities damaged by the storm.

Starting in 1997, the Prince of Wales also visited Romania to view and draw attention to some of the destruction caused during the Communist rule of Nicolae Ceauşescu, particularly Orthodox monasteries and Saxon villages of Transylvania, where he purchased a house.

Charles also became patron of two Romanian built environment organisations: the Mihai Eminescu Trust and the International Network for Traditional Building, Architecture, and Urbanism), an advocate of architecture that respects cultural tradition and identity.

source: wikipedia

So Prince Charles has done a lot for this country so far, including helping its disadvantaged young people, give advice on issues such as the environment, urban planning and the improvement of people's quality of life and is also the patron of many, many charities.

Far from sitting on his butt doing nothing all day, Charles is, in fact, serving his country proudly, as we saw on the brilliant BBC documentary last night.

The Queen is also a great Head of State, always does her duty to serve her country even at the grand age of 82 and is infinitely more adored and respected around the world than any president of any republic is.

B.L,

Honestly, who knew. I surely didn't and I'm ashamed.

Sincerely,
scratch
 

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