Iran cartoon show mocks Holocaust


Blackleaf
#1
A contest was launched in February in response to widespread Muslim outrage at the publication of Danish cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammed in European newspapers.



Iran cartoon show mocks Holocaust

Tehran exhibition attacks West's 'double standards' over religious satire

Robert Tait in Tehran
Sunday August 20, 2006
The Observer


Ariel Sharon, the incapacitated former Israeli Prime Minister, is wearing an SS uniform. A man with Jewish side locks is depicted as a vampire drinking from a container marked 'Palestinian blood'. An Arab figure is impaled to the ground by the absurdly long nose of a man in a black hat characteristic of orthodox Jews and marked 'Holocaust'.

At their worst, the images conform to lurid western stereotypes of Iran as a hotbed of anti-Semitism, as evoked by President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's dismissal of the Holocaust as a 'myth'.

They are among the results of a competition run by the country's biggest-selling newspaper, Hamshahri, to find the 'cleverest' cartoons satirising the slaughter of six million Jews by the Nazis in the Second World War.

More than 200 images have gone on public display in an exhibition at Tehran's Palestine Contemporary Art Museum. The exhibition's opening was attended by the de facto Palestinian ambassador to Iran, Salah al-Zawawi, who has full diplomatic status in Tehran.

Organisers say they received about 750 entries from around the world, including America and Britain, as well as many Muslim countries. The winning entrant will be announced next month and will receive a prize of US$12,000 (6,380).

The contest, condemned by Israel and Jewish organisations, was launched in February in response to widespread Muslim outrage at the publication of Danish cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammed in European newspapers. It followed a series of anti-Israeli outbursts from Ahmadinejad, including a call for the Jewish state to be wiped off the map.

Massoud Shojai Tabatabai, director of the Iranian House of Cartoons which co-ordinated the project, said its aim was to challenge perceived western double-standards on free speech, which Iran's leaders insist precludes openly debating the authenticity of the Holocaust.

'Why is it acceptable in western countries to draw any caricature of the Prophet Mohammed, yet as soon as there are any questions or doubts raised about the Holocaust, fines and jail sentences are handed down?' Tabatabai told The Observer.

That sentiment finds expression in a split-image cartoon from a Brazilian entrant in which a stand-up comic is portrayed performing in a venue called the West Club. In one image, captioned 'Making jokes about Islam', the comedian is greeted with raucous laughter. But the accompanying picture, marked 'Making jokes about the Holocaust', shows him being booted out of the window.

The exhibition's other themes are a contention that the death toll of the Holocaust is exaggerated and a comparison of the Nazis' behaviour with Israel's treatment of the Palestinians. The latter is explored in a cartoon, purportedly by a Belgian Jewish artist, in which two parallel railway lines - one marked with a swastika, the other with a star of David - merge before leading into a building resembling Auschwitz and bearing the slogan 'Welcome home'.

'We are concerned about the real holocaust, which is happening to Palestinians,' said Tabatabai. 'Why should Palestinians pay for events which happened thousands of kilometres away in Europe?'

The exhibition comes at time when displays of official anti-Zionist propaganda in Iran have reached new levels following the conflict in Lebanon between Israel and the Iranian-backed Shia militia, Hizbollah.

Nevertheless, some of those attending seemed more interested in the art and uncertain about the underlying political convictions of the work on show. 'It's a good exhibition with different levels of artistic ability,' said Mohammed, 26, a student in Tehran University's fine arts faculty. 'Of course I'm supportive of the Palestinians. But if so many artists decided to participate in this contest, then the Holocaust must have happened.'

guardian.co.uk
 
Daz_Hockey
#2
That's disgusting, Mohammed was ONE man, thats all he was, draw a picture of his for christsake, I find it insulting that you cannot draw a picture of him.

NOW te slaughter of millions of jews as a comic strip?, now that truely is insulting, it's a racial slur, it's evil and deserves to have people bombarding that particular countries foreign embassy.

I was just watching the TV, and all I can hear is comments about how it was europe's fault for the jewish state and why should the palestines pay for it....well....hang on, never heared of the Grand Mufti?, or perhaps the majority of Arabs who were on Hitler's side just waiting to join up with his forces?....no, it was a WORLD war, not a european one, burying their heads in the sand and saying stuff like that is as stupid and racist as any stupid drawings.

What kind of an idiot can compare the two?

Disgusting, bomb the lot of em
 
#juan
No Party Affiliation
#3
As an Arab newspaper said,

If the Danish cartoons of Mohammad were "freedom of the press", why are cartoons of the 60 year old Holocaust, not. Seems fair to me, though I don't care for jokes about the Holocaust.
 
Daz_Hockey
#4
well the fact is juan, there were'nt millions of Mohammeds being slaughtered, it wasnt very recent (and not thousands of years ago) and mocking one man in my opion doesnt constitute as a racial slur.

whereas the mocking of of the systematic murder of an entire race?....what in the world can you see as a justifiable comparison of the two?.
 
#juan
No Party Affiliation
#5
Daz

I don't think it is the comparative weights of the crimes, but freedom of the press. I'm not a holocaust denier. I've been to two of the camps. If freedom of the press excuses one, it must excuse both.
 
EastSideScotian
#6
Very Disturbing. The point is, that Iran is blantently useing hate propaghanda. The Danish cartoon was condmened by most evryone.
 
Daz_Hockey
#7
very tricky, very tricky indeed, but the two are very different cases as you and I know....I dont know, with a freedom of the press comes a responsibilty surely?

where do you draw the line?, the drawing of a man who died centuries ago or the drawing of a whole race not 65 years ago?
 
tamarin
Conservative
#8
Well, if this keeps up we'll probably go back to the language basics of forty years ago when no one batted an eye or twitched an ear to hear an Arab called a *** or ***. We've been in the PC pen for a long time. Guess we're just about to break out. I can hear the peanut gallery folk tossing cashews: two wrongs don't make a right!
Surely, if the despots of the Mid-East can do and say as they please, why do we even care about etiquette?
 
#juan
No Party Affiliation
#9
Admittedly, "freedom of the Press" is becoming a bit murky, and it is hard to say what a court of law might say about this. Originally, "Freedom of the Press" was not expressed as "Freedom of the Press except for this situation or that". It was simply "Freedom of the Press". There is an answer, but I fear it might be thirty eight pages long.
 
Daz_Hockey
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan

Admittedly, "freedom of the Press" is becoming a bit murky, and it is hard to say what a court of law might say about this. Originally, "Freedom of the Press" was not expressed as "Freedom of the Press except for this situation or that". It was simply "Freedom of the Press". There is an answer, but I fear it might be thirty eight pages long.


#juan


I would agree with the above, but, Heinsight is an exact science, when the colonies decided to include the idea of a "freedom of the press" they hadn't encountered Julius Stricher and Der Stermer had they?.

And while drawing a picture of a middle eastern looking gentleman may offend people (and let's admit it here, where it was published there isn't really any noticable population from anywhere near arabia), it is much more offensive and calous to draw a picture of a race (on your doorstep I might add) of whom teetered on the very real possibility of being completly exterminated 65 years ago and have had to face neighbour who would like to complete the job constantly.

I'm sorry #juan, weighing it up, they don't compare.
 
#juan
No Party Affiliation
#11
Quote:

And while drawing a picture of a middle eastern looking gentleman may offend people (and let's admit it here, where it was published there isn't really any noticable population from anywhere near arabia), it is much more offensive and calous to draw a picture of a race (on your doorstep I might add) of whom teetered on the very real possibility of being completly exterminated 65 years ago and have had to face neighbour who would like to complete the job constantly.

I'm sorry #juan, weighing it up, they don't compare.

Daz you are still comparing offenses. I am not. Of course the offenses don't compare. Freedom of speech was upheld in Denmark, and it will be upheld in Iran as well, wouldn't you think?
 
Just the Facts
Free Thinker
#12
I think the best response would be a calm rolling of the eyes and maybe a "what a bunch of immature doorknobs" or something along those lines. They're just trying to get a rise out of the Jews so they can say "see! you're offended same as we were". Just ignore them. Let them have their stupid cartoon contest, and let them wallow in their own stupidity.

And buy an electric car, that would be the best way to give them the finger. Like the guy in Syriana said, "a hundred years ago you were living in tents out here in the desert chopping each other's heads off and that's where you'll be in another hundred years".
 
Toro
#13
Iran has every right to publish such a cartoon IMHO.

But it does give an interesting view of the mindset.
 
Daz_Hockey
#14
maybe they do, but after the Mohammed affair surely they should expect nothing less than a public burning of their flag across the predominantly christian nations of this world?..

will it happen?, will the christian society demand the deaths of the artists in question?....


of course not, I find it somewhat odd especially how stir-crazy they were going about the pictures of their profit.
 
Lithp
#15
OK,
So Iran has every right to publish that cartoon. So if a common Iranian citizen published a cartoon mocking mohammed and islam there would be no problems for them right?

Lets face it. Islamic nations are oppressive in the extreme when their government rules by islamic law.

The sad part is all the extremeists who say they are waging this islamic jihad for their religion actually underestimate the power of their own god.
I'm sure that if their god is as powerful as they protray then all the "infidels" will meet their fate through him. I'm sure their god does not need any of their help in executing "justice".
 
Daz_Hockey
#16
whats sad is all the muslims in the UK who openly want to introduce Sharia law to parts of bradford in the north
 
sine000
#17
Man...someone should kill the people who make the cartoons....

THIS IS NOT ONLY A DISGRACE TO THE JEWS....IT IS A DISGRACE TO EVERYONE WHO HAD TO LIVE THROUGH IT!!
 
Just the Facts
Free Thinker
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Daz_Hockey

maybe they do, but after the Mohammed affair surely they should expect nothing less than a public burning of their flag across the predominantly christian nations of this world?..

I think that's exactly what they want, in order to vindicate their own behaviour. Lets not give them the satisfaction.
 
sine000
#19
haha...Iran has nothing to do besides threatening the world with enriching Uranium....ah....
 
agentkgb
#20
Freedom of speech should excuse both, although I agree that in Iran dissing Mohammed would be an idiotic idea. I'm not Muslim, but it seems like mocking the holiness of Mohammed might be more offensive to the many Muslims around the world than mocking the terrors of the Holocaust would offend Jews.
Is it mocking the Holocaust as a whole (including the 4-5 million non-Jews who were killed), or the deaths of Jews during the Holocaust. If its the later I think it's a display of hatred of a religious group, which mocking Mohammed is too.
 
sine000
#21
true...but Iran takes Mohammad to seriously....
 
typingrandomstuff
#22
Now, you wouldn't say a country indirectly disliking another country would create a great image.
 
Logic 7
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

A contest was launched in February in response to widespread Muslim outrage at the publication of Danish cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammed in European newspapers.



Iran cartoon show mocks Holocaust



'We are concerned about the real holocaust, which is happening to Palestinians,' said Tabatabai. 'Why should Palestinians pay for events which happened thousands of kilometres away in Europe?'

The exhibition comes at time when displays of official anti-Zionist propaganda in Iran have reached new levels following the conflict in Lebanon between Israel and the Iranian-backed Shia militia, Hizbollah.

Nevertheless, some of those attending seemed more interested in the art and uncertain about the underlying political convictions of the work on show. 'It's a good exhibition with different levels of artistic ability,' said Mohammed, 26, a student in Tehran University's fine arts faculty. 'Of course I'm supportive of the Palestinians. But if so many artists decided to participate in this contest, then the Holocaust must have happened.'

guardian.co.uk



That is a very good question from a student.


"Why should Palestinians pay for events which happened thousands of kilometres away in Europe?'"
 
#juan
No Party Affiliation
#24
It is interesting that the Islamic world retaliates for Danish newspaper cartoons by attacking Jews with cartoons. The only connection I can see is that Jews own the majority of newspapers. This is not meant to be anti-semitic. Jews do own a large number of the world's newspapers.
 
Daz_Hockey
#25
see, I was watching a program on the religious take over by aytolah Humani (or however it's spelt), now at the time, he was one of 2 imans trying to guide through iran and away from the shah...arguably, this older cleric was more popular than Humani, and was kind of his senior.....

well, you may think the older fella might have been worse....untrue, his dying words were "BEWARE OF THE TOTALITARIAN DICTATOR WHO DRESSES HIMSELF IN CLERICAL SHEEPSKIN"

Now if someone had bloody listened to THAT, there would be no Al Queda...simple.
 

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