Pilots did everything right


#juan
#1
Animation of Hudson River Landing.....I was impressed. Pilots did everything right.

YouTube - Hudson River Plane Landing (US Airways 1549) Animation with Audio
 
CDNBear
#2
Juan, to say I was impressed, would be understating what I truly think.

Amazing, simply amazing.
 
#juan
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Juan, to say I was impressed, would be understating what I truly think.

Amazing, simply amazing.

I think the pilots knew what they were going to do and ignored suggestions to look for an airport. As it turned out, they had just time enough to do exactly what they did. Bravo.
 
CDNBear
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

I think the pilots knew what they were going to do and ignored suggestions to look for an airport. As it turned out, they had just time enough to do exactly what they did. Bravo.

Bravo indeed!

A water landing, from my limited knowledge of flying, is an extremely difficult task to accomplish in a small plane, at best.

To do it in a commercial airliner, lose no one to boot!

Again...simply amazing. Awesome piloting.
 
lone wolf
#5
Now THAT is cool thinking under one Hell of a lot of pressure....
 
shadowshiv
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by #juan View Post

I think the pilots knew what they were going to do and ignored suggestions to look for an airport. As it turned out, they had just time enough to do exactly what they did. Bravo.

And one can only imagine what would have happened had they chosen to look for an airport instead. How many lives(in the plane and on the ground) could have been lost?
 
lone wolf
#7
Go Air Force!
 
L Gilbert
#8
I think their actions were remarkable and a bit extraordinary. (I hate the word "amazing")
 
Hazmart
#9
This still amazes me. Absolutely amazing.
lone wolf I was thinking the same, the pilot is so calm on the recording, you would never know anything was wrong. Amazing!
 
L Gilbert
#10
Thanks, Haz.
 
shadowshiv
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Hazmart View Post

This still amazes me. Absolutely amazing.
lone wolf I was thinking the same, the pilot is so calm on the recording, you would never know anything was wrong. Amazing!

That is why I could never be a pilot. The pressure and (potential) pitfalls that they face each and every time they take flight is immense. With a car, you can at least pull off to the side of the road. With a plane...where can you go?

Kudos to the pilots.
 
shadowshiv
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by L Gilbert View Post

Thanks, Haz.

I think you both posted at the same time. I don't think she was slighting you, Gilbert.
 
CDNBear
#13
Amazing, simply amazing...

 
#juan
#14
I have some experience in much smaller jets but there is one rule that seems to apply to all. Airspeed, Altitude, and Ideas. You don't want to run out of them at the same time.
 
Curiosity
#15
Thanks for the video Juan - Capt. Sullenberger (?) had nerves of steel - no matter how many times they rehearsed the drill....

Why can't they come up with some kind of screening for birdstrikes on the turbines?

Would it compromise the engines? There seem to be so many accidents caused by birds....

I wonder if he is back flying yet.

Curio
Last edited by Curiosity; Apr 4th, 2009 at 03:15 PM..
 
lone wolf
#16
They used to have great protection. Propellers!
 
Curiosity
#17
lone wolf

Right!! These modern gimmicks are worthless!!
 
#juan
#18
A bit more info about bird strikes:

Top 10 Things to Know About Bird Strikes
 
bobnoorduyn
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

They used to have great protection. Propellers!

Well, kinda partly true, the propellers themselves don't prevent the ingestion of birds, (or other debris, small dogs, cats and such). The design and positioning of the engine inlet on many larger modern turboprops puts it out of the line of fire, so to speak, of incoming beasties. In other words, the intake is not aligned with the actual engine inlet so the inertia of the bird, or whatever, allows it to bypass the engine entirely, and often exiting through a bypass door, (though not in the same healthy condition in which it entered). Even with older or smaller, and other modern large turboprops that don't employ this feature, the engine inlet is a much smaller target than that of a turbojet or turbofan and less likely to eat a large fowl dinner.
 
bobnoorduyn
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post

Thanks for the video Juan - Capt. Sullenberger (?) had nerves of steel - no matter how many times they rehearsed the drill....

Why can't they come up with some kind of screening for birdstrikes on the turbines?

Would it compromise the engines? There seem to be so many accidents caused by birds....

I wonder if he is back flying yet.

Curio

I don't know what drill they actually rehearsed, I sometimes think I worked for the only company that actually trained for a landing after a total power loss. It always came as a surprise, you had to identify that it was a multiple flameout, (not an electrical failure) there were memory actions to be completed, and the simulator was programmed so you could not get a relight and had to deadstick to a successful landing on the confines of the pavement you were aiming for, (BTW contrary to popular belief, commercial jetliners do glide quite well).

As for question one/two; a screen would never be strong enough, plus it would be highly conducive to icing, an even worse threat. There could be ways to deflect birds away from the engine, but no one has come up with anything practical yet, so we have to rely on the strength and integrity of titanium blades, these things can take a lot of abuse, but only to a point.

Wondering? Hell, if I had Million $$$ +++ book deals I'd hang up my wings in a New York minute.
 
lone wolf
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduyn View Post

I don't know what drill they actually rehearsed, I sometimes think I worked for the only company that actually trained for a landing after a total power loss. It always came as a surprise, you had to identify that it was a multiple flameout, (not an electrical failure) there were memory actions to be completed, and the simulator was programmed so you could not get a relight and had to deadstick to a successful landing on the confines of the pavement you were aiming for, (BTW contrary to popular belief, commercial jetliners do glide quite well).

As for question one/two; a screen would never be strong enough, plus it would be highly conducive to icing, an even worse threat. There could be ways to deflect birds away from the engine, but no one has come up with anything practical yet, so we have to rely on the strength and integrity of titanium blades, these things can take a lot of abuse, but only to a point.

Wondering? Hell, if I had Million $$$ +++ book deals I'd hang up my wings in a New York minute.

No ya wouldn't.... Ya'd be fixin' a turbo to a Norseman frame....
 
bobnoorduyn
#22
While what Capt. Sully accomplished was acceptional, and I by no means wish to steal his thunder, we shouldn't forget the crew of Air Canada Flight 143, a B-767which landed in Gimli after fuel exhaustion, and that of Air Transat Flight 236, an A-330 which did likewise in the Azores. I don't think they got book deals, and I can be certain their names are hardly known outside the industry. Maybe because they're Canadian, eh?
 
bobnoorduyn
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

No ya wouldn't.... Ya'd be fixin' a turbo to a Norseman frame....

Nope, I'd be fixin' ta jest buys me a regular one, if there's any still left alive fer buyin'. Turbo's is ok, but there's nuthin' like the sound of one of them PW R1340 reciprocatin' round engines.
 
lone wolf
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduyn View Post

Nope, I'd be fixin' ta jest buys me a regular one, if there's any still left alive fer buyin'. Turbo's is ok, but there's nuthin' like the sound of one of them PW R1340 reciprocatin' round engines.

Glad to hear it. I'm partial to radials myself....

Ever checked Arizona? I heard about a really nice Beaver rebuilt from there....
 
bobnoorduyn
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

Glad to hear it. I'm partial to radials myself....

Ever checked Arizona? I heard about a really nice Beaver rebuilt from there....

Sorry, no, I'm not that partial to the Beaver anyway, maybe because they weren't that much of a challenge, kind of boring, I dunno.
 
Curiosity
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by bobnoorduyn View Post

While what Capt. Sully accomplished was acceptional, and I by no means wish to steal his thunder, we shouldn't forget the crew of Air Canada Flight 143, a B-767which landed in Gimli after fuel exhaustion, and that of Air Transat Flight 236, an A-330 which did likewise in the Azores. I don't think they got book deals, and I can be certain their names are hardly known outside the industry. Maybe because they're Canadian, eh?

Bobnoorduyn

Thanks for your responses and answers - for all our exposure to flight these days we remain ignorant of procedures in place for all kinds of circumstances. I think the publicity given Capt. Sully and his crew was because they landed with no advertised injury (other than horrible flashbacks no doubt) to passengers and it happened in the middle of the New York metropolis where film and news were immediately available for on the scene reportage. The evacuation procedure utilized was text book - as the crew related in one of their post accident interviews by the press the next day or two. Also forgot about icing and screens...thanks!

News and information (or lack of it) in no way demeans all the wonderful landings we never hear of by flight crews all over our world....and for a flying public perhaps it is better that way - we were never meant to be aeronautical animals and if our machine fails, we are at the mercy of fate.

I honestly believe Scully could run that landing through in his sleep ... he appears to be one of those Boy Scout types who remains responsible to his job rather than seeking fame. Look at all the flights he has on his log which we have never heard of....because there were no incidents.

There was one flight attendant (the one at the far rear exit) I am concerned with - I believe she will not fly on duty again and may be suffering with trauma...at least the press have left her alone.
 
Curiosity
#27
Juan

Thanks for that information on bird strikes... I had no idea of the scope of that problem....

They should be selling bird strike insurance to people...
 
spaminator
#28
MIRACLE ON THE HUDSON: Survivor still counts his blessings 10 years later
Craig Robertson
Published:
January 10, 2019
Updated:
January 10, 2019 11:37 AM EST
WATCH ABOVE as Sun’s lifestyle editor Rita DeMontis talks to ‘Miracle on the Hudson’ survivor Dave Sanderson who is remembering the heroic achievement by pilot Sully Sullenberger ten years later.
What do YOU think?
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http://youtube.com/watch?v=BUWz7hdvfwg
http://torontosun.com/news/world/mir...10-years-later
 

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