Here’s how much plastic you might be eating every day


B00Mer
#1
Here’s how much plastic you might be eating every day



The average American adult consumes between 126 and 142 tiny particles of plastic every day, and inhales another 132-170 plastic bits daily too, according to new research from the University of Victoria.

The study, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, attempted to estimate how many microplastic particles people consume — and these numbers are likely an underestimate, the researchers say.

Microplastics, which are pieces or fibres of plastic smaller than 5 mm (about the size of a grain of rice), are a growing area of research in the scientific community, and have been found in fish, water, table salt and many more places, including human stool, in one small study.

To figure out how much people were consuming, the researchers combined known quantities of microplastics in various foods and in the air with the diets recommended by the food guide and estimates of how much people eat of those foods.

For example, seafood was estimated to have 1.48 microplastic particles per gram. The recommended weekly seafood intake for young men is 281 grams per week. So according to this, that person would be eating about 414 microplastic particles from seafood alone.

But according to lead researcher Kieran Cox, a PhD candidate at the University of Victoria, scientists have only looked at the microplastic content of about 15 per cent of our diet — meaning they don’t know how much plastic is in the rest.

“By not being able to look at that 85 per cent, we are missing a large piece of the puzzle, which, if the data is representative, is probably a large magnitude increase in plastic,” he said.


Because the study examined existing literature — which counted plastic particles rather than weighing or measuring the plastic, for example — the researchers couldn’t come up with a more precise measurement than the number of particles. This means they don’t know whether their estimate of 52,000 ingested particles each year amount to a teaspoon of plastic, or a tiny pinch.

They also don’t know what it means for your health.
“It is still unclear to what extent our estimate of human consumption of (microplastics) poses a risk to human health,” the authors of the study wrote.
This calculation is just a starting point, said Peter Ross, vice president of research at Ocean Wise, an environmental conservation organization.

“It’s simply part one of a three-part process,” he said. “Part one is do the exposure, part two is understand what the harm is based on different studies, and part three is you do a risk assessment that you can apply to the larger population.”

To him, the exact amount of plastic people ingest doesn’t matter that much.
“The point is that everybody is ingesting microplastics.”
“And number one, we don’t know where these things are coming from, and number two, we don’t have a clue what they might do to us,” he said.


There are two ways that plastics can cause harm, Ross said. The first is that chemicals in plastic can leach out into our bodies. A particularly famous example of a plastic-related chemical was Bisphenol-A (BPA), which has been removed from baby bottles after it was linked to brain and developmental issues.

The second way plastic can cause harm is by its physical presence, Ross said. In animals, “We know that plastic can suffocate. It can block our intestines.” Some animals might eat it and feel full, but not get enough nutrition, he said.

“Micro plastics are just like snowflakes,” he said. “There’s an infinite number of shapes and sizes and chemistries.” Each one might have a slightly different effect.

Microplastics get into the environment in a number of ways, Cox said. The most common type of microplastic is fibres, he said. “Washing your clothes and having that water go out into the ocean, that is a large amount of plastic.”

Single-use plastics also contribute, he said, as tiny bits of plastic can flake off.

As plastics get into the environment, they can wind up in your food, he said. And sometimes, they can get directly from containers into your food — like with bottled water. Drinking bottled water meant an extra 90,000 microplastic particles every year compared to tap water, the researchers found.
“A single choice like mitigating bottled water, added up over the year, has a big consequence,” Cox said.
Ross isn’t sure what can be done to cut down the amount of plastic in the environment, though.

“It’s pretty late in the game,” he said. “We find microplastics all over the Arctic and our seawater samples that we’re collecting all up and down the coast of B.C.

“If we can determine that these things are harmful, then we’ve obviously caused some uncertain amount of damage in the environment or to human health.”


https://globalnews.ca/news/5352302/m...mption-health/


The upside, when I die my family will save on embalming, because I will be more plastic than human..
 
Decapoda
+4
#2  Top Rated Post
Average life expectancy in 1900 was 46.3 for males, and 48.3 for females. In 2018 it was 73.8 and 79.5 respectively. Someone should study the potential health benefits of plastic.
 
B00Mer
+1
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Decapoda View Post

Average life expectancy in 1900 was 46.3 for males, and 48.3 for females. In 2018 it was 73.8 and 79.5 respectively. Someone should study the potential health benefits of plastic.

This should give you pause next time you have sex...

Just what percentage of plastic is your girlfriend..

 
Walter
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Here’s how much plastic you might be eating every day



The average American adult consumes between 126 and 142 tiny particles of plastic every day, and inhales another 132-170 plastic bits daily too, according to new research from the University of Victoria.

The study, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, attempted to estimate how many microplastic particles people consume — and these numbers are likely an underestimate, the researchers say.

Microplastics, which are pieces or fibres of plastic smaller than 5 mm (about the size of a grain of rice), are a growing area of research in the scientific community, and have been found in fish, water, table salt and many more places, including human stool, in one small study.

To figure out how much people were consuming, the researchers combined known quantities of microplastics in various foods and in the air with the diets recommended by the food guide and estimates of how much people eat of those foods.

For example, seafood was estimated to have 1.48 microplastic particles per gram. The recommended weekly seafood intake for young men is 281 grams per week. So according to this, that person would be eating about 414 microplastic particles from seafood alone.

But according to lead researcher Kieran Cox, a PhD candidate at the University of Victoria, scientists have only looked at the microplastic content of about 15 per cent of our diet — meaning they don’t know how much plastic is in the rest.

“By not being able to look at that 85 per cent, we are missing a large piece of the puzzle, which, if the data is representative, is probably a large magnitude increase in plastic,” he said.


Because the study examined existing literature — which counted plastic particles rather than weighing or measuring the plastic, for example — the researchers couldn’t come up with a more precise measurement than the number of particles. This means they don’t know whether their estimate of 52,000 ingested particles each year amount to a teaspoon of plastic, or a tiny pinch.

They also don’t know what it means for your health.

“It is still unclear to what extent our estimate of human consumption of (microplastics) poses a risk to human health,” the authors of the study wrote.


This calculation is just a starting point, said Peter Ross, vice president of research at Ocean Wise, an environmental conservation organization.

“It’s simply part one of a three-part process,” he said. “Part one is do the exposure, part two is understand what the harm is based on different studies, and part three is you do a risk assessment that you can apply to the larger population.”

To him, the exact amount of plastic people ingest doesn’t matter that much.
“The point is that everybody is ingesting microplastics.”

“And number one, we don’t know where these things are coming from, and number two, we don’t have a clue what they might do to us,” he said.


There are two ways that plastics can cause harm, Ross said. The first is that chemicals in plastic can leach out into our bodies. A particularly famous example of a plastic-related chemical was Bisphenol-A (BPA), which has been removed from baby bottles after it was linked to brain and developmental issues.

The second way plastic can cause harm is by its physical presence, Ross said. In animals, “We know that plastic can suffocate. It can block our intestines.” Some animals might eat it and feel full, but not get enough nutrition, he said.

“Micro plastics are just like snowflakes,” he said. “There’s an infinite number of shapes and sizes and chemistries.” Each one might have a slightly different effect.

Microplastics get into the environment in a number of ways, Cox said. The most common type of microplastic is fibres, he said. “Washing your clothes and having that water go out into the ocean, that is a large amount of plastic.”

Single-use plastics also contribute, he said, as tiny bits of plastic can flake off.

As plastics get into the environment, they can wind up in your food, he said. And sometimes, they can get directly from containers into your food — like with bottled water. Drinking bottled water meant an extra 90,000 microplastic particles every year compared to tap water, the researchers found.
“A single choice like mitigating bottled water, added up over the year, has a big consequence,” Cox said.


Ross isn’t sure what can be done to cut down the amount of plastic in the environment, though.

“It’s pretty late in the game,” he said. “We find microplastics all over the Arctic and our seawater samples that we’re collecting all up and down the coast of B.C.

“If we can determine that these things are harmful, then we’ve obviously caused some uncertain amount of damage in the environment or to human health.”


https://globalnews.ca/news/5352302/m...mption-health/

Utter bullshit.
 
B00Mer
+3
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Utter bullshit.

No not bullshit, plastic.

Utter plastic.
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Decapoda View Post

Average life expectancy in 1900 was 46.3 for males, and 48.3 for females. In 2018 it was 73.8 and 79.5 respectively. Someone should study the potential health benefits of plastic.

It's been dropping lately in some countries. The life expectancy for males is starting to go down very slowly in the USA.
 
taxslave
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by b00mer View Post

no not bullshit, plastic.
Udder plastic.

fify.
 
B00Mer
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

It's been dropping lately in some countries. The life expectancy for males is starting to go down very slowly in the USA.

You see how far America is.. not great on the heart
 
Walter
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

It's been dropping lately in some countries. The life expectancy for males is starting to go down very slowly in the USA.

That’s the opioid epidemic doing that.
 
Curious Cdn
-1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

That’s the opioid epidemic doing that.

Probably ... that and general decline. Substandard public healthcare availability can do it, too.
 
Walter
+1
#11
Americans have access to the best healthcare in the world. Mick Jagger got patched up in the US cuz the UK system, like Canada’s, is substandard.
 
Curious Cdn
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Americans have access to the best healthcare in the world. Mick Jagger got patched up in the US cuz the UK system, like Canada’s, is substandard.

Some Americans do. Lots of them have access to diddly-squat. The average American gets what the average Canadian gets for about $2500 more per person per year.
 
Blackleaf
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Americans have access to the best healthcare in the world. Mick Jagger got patched up in the US cuz the UK system, like Canada’s, is substandard.

The NHS is often ranked the best health service in the world.
 
Curious Cdn
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The NHS is often ranked the best health service in the world.

The Americans have the best health care but it is reserved for the filthy rich, only. If you're Middle Class, you lose everything if you get sick or injured. If you're poor, you are lucky to get a bandaid. We see poor Americans up here in Canada getting treatment in Canadian Emergency Wards (what you call "Casualty") all the time in our cities near the border. No one is turned away. That is our law.
Last edited by Curious Cdn; 1 week ago at 08:56 AM..
 
Walter
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Some Americans do. Lots of them have access to diddly-squat. The average American gets what the average Canadian gets for about $2500 more per person per year.

I have an MD brother in the US and no one is turned away at the hospital or clinic.
 
Curious Cdn
-1
#16
No white ones, anyway.
 
Walter
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

The NHS is often ranked the best health service in the world.

By whom, certainly no capitalist, free-enterprise organization.
 
Walter
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

No white ones, anyway.

Yer racist.
 
Curious Cdn
-1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Yer racist.

Yer blind.
 
Walter
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Yer blind.

Blind to skin colour anyway.
 
Curious Cdn
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Blind to skin colour anyway.

I'll bet.
 
taxslave
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

The Americans have the best health care but it is reserved for the filthy rich, only. If you're Middle Class, you lose everything if you get sick or injured. If you're poor, you are lucky to get a bandaid. We see poor Americans up here in Canada getting treatment in Canadian Emergency Wards (what you call "Casualty") all the time in our cities near the border. No one is turned away. That is our law.

All non citizens are billed for medical care in Canada. Usually Visa or Mastercard up front. We also bill for ambulance rides.
 
Curious Cdn
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

All non citizens are billed for medical care in Canada. Usually Visa or Mastercard up front. We also bill for ambulance rides.

if they can't pay, they can't pay. There is no Canadian ER who'll turn someone away because their Visa was refused or there wallet is empty. You get the service, then you get billed and a whole lot of American visitors here never pay their bills.
 
taxslave
#24
The joys of socialism. Even the freeloaders get help.
 
Walter
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

The joys of socialism. Even the freeloaders get help.

Socialism forces everyone, except the elites, to wait.
 
taxslave
+1
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Socialism forces everyone, except the elites, to wait.

The elite being the party faithful. Everyone else must give "their fair share".
 
NZDoug
#27
Edible island!
The mid Pacific garbage patch will make a wonderful food source for the next generation and maybe build a new city on it.
Cool?
 
Curious Cdn
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by NZDoug View Post

Edible island!
The mid Pacific garbage patch will make a wonderful food source for the next generation and maybe build a new city on it.
Cool?

Got a recipe for Rubber Duck a L'Orange Fish Net Float.
 

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