Rare Tudor gun shield used to protect Henry VIII to go to auction


Blackleaf
#1
An incredibly rare Tudor shield once used by King Henry VIII and his men has been put up for sale at auction for £50,000.

The remarkable 'gun shield' dates back to the 16th century were used by the king's bodyguards to protect the monarch.

The metal armour, around the size of a dustbin lid, has a specially designed hole in the centre to poke a matchlock pistol through.


Rare Tudor 'gun shield' used by Henry VIII's bodyguards to protect the 16th century king is set to fetch £50,000 at auction

Rare metal armour is one of only 35 in the world and goes on sale on May 1
Shield comes with a specially designed hole to poke a matchlock pistol through
There hasn't been a Tudor gun shield on the market in more than 40 years


By CONNOR BOYD FOR MAILONLINE
17 April 2019

An incredibly rare Tudor shield once used by King Henry VIII and his men has been put up for sale at auction for £50,000.

The remarkable 'gun shield' dates back to the 16th century were used by the king's bodyguards to protect the monarch.

The metal armour, around the size of a dustbin lid, has a specially designed hole in the centre to poke a matchlock pistol through.


This incredibly rare Tudor shield once used by King Henry VIII and his men has been put up for sale at auction for £50,000


There is less than 35 of them in the world and they come with a specially designed hole in the centre to poke a matchlock pistol through

After Henry's death in 1547, an inventory of the Royal Armoury held on to 35 of them.

It's not known how many survive today but there are three on display at the Tower of London while another is at Windsor Castle.

The shield being sold by auctioneers Woolley and Wallis of Salisbury, Wiltshire, is from a private collection.

Experts at the auction house have invested several hundred man hours establishing the shield's heritage.

Ned Cowell, arms and armour specialist at the firm, said their studies showed the item formed part of the same collection as the one in the Tower of London.

He said: 'This was always an exciting piece and the opportunity to compare it with shields held in the Royal Collection has shown just how historically important it is.


The remarkable 'gun shield' dates back to the 16th century and is identical to the defences known to be used by King Henry VIII's bodyguards

'To have an object so closely associated to a monarch that wrought such profound changes on English society is just incredible.

'To find these is extremely rare and as far as I know there has not been one of the market since the 1970s.

'It's even unusual for them to come up with dealers so I would be surprised if I see another in my lifetime.

'It's an amazing opportunity and we've been taking a lot of interest in it already.'


The convex circular shield has a diameter of around 20inches. There is gash near the centre - possibly caused by a spike or a halberd weapon

The convex circular shield has a diameter of around 20inches and would have been held using iron straps at the back.

It remains in generally good condition but comes with some battle damage. There is a large gash caused by a spike or a halberd weapon near the centre of the artefact.

Prior to coming into its current ownership, the piece was previously on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in 1931.

The sale takes place on May 1.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...0-auction.html
 
Curious Cdn
#2
We developed one of those during WWI! It was a shovel with a big hole in the middle!

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/f...600.009-e.html

They said that we could have British Government, French Culture and American Know-how but instead, we got French Government, American Culture and British Know-,how.
 
Blackleaf
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

We developed one of those during WWI! It was a shovel with a big hole in the middle!
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/f...600.009-e.html
They said that we could have British Government, French Culture and American Know-how but instead, we got French Government, American Culture and British Know-,how.

So he thought he had invented something when he actually hadn't.
 
Curious Cdn
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

So he thought he had invented something when he actually hadn't.

It was one of the stupidest things that anyone had seen and we still laugh about it 105 years later. It wasn't so funny for the poor souls at the Second Battle of Ypres who had to "dig in" using shovels with holes in the during a battle. Needlees to say, those and a lot of very flawed gear were disposed of immediately after that first battle.
 
Blackleaf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

It was one of the stupidest things that anyone had seen and we still laugh about it 105 years later. It wasn't so funny for the poor souls at the Second Battle of Ypres who had to "dig in" using shovels with holes in the during a battle. Needlees to say, those and a lot of very flawed gear were disposed of immediately after that first battle.

Lots of weirds, and often useless, things were invented during WWI.


German


American


British
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Lots of weirds, and often useless, things were invented during WWI.

German

American

British

.... and Canadian ...

Like "Income Tax", which is a temporary measure brought in under the War Measures Act of 1914 and soon to be lifted just as soon as the crisis lifts.
 
Cliffy
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

.... and Canadian ...

Like "Income Tax", which is a temporary measure brought in under the War Measures Act of 1914 and soon to be lifted just as soon as the crisis lifts.

but... but... we must be still in crisis.
 
Blackleaf
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

.... and Canadian ...

Like "Income Tax", which is a temporary measure brought in under the War Measures Act of 1914 and soon to be lifted just as soon as the crisis lifts.

Income tax was invented in Roman Egypt.

I got my monthly wage on Thursday and I got a £250 bonus. Even the bonus got taxed. About £50 of it, I think, was taken out for income tax.
 
MHz
#9
What year did you people first decide that killing most of the people you met in your travels was the road to eternal success??
 
Curious Cdn
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

What year did you people first decide that killing most of the people you met in your travels was the road to eternal success??

Somewhere around 7,500 B.C. when agricultural civilizations first started coveting their neighbour's greener grass.

Pushing up through smoke
From a world half darkened
By overhanging cloud
The shroud that mushroomed out
And struck the dome in the sky
Black, red, blue, dance in the air
Merge
Scatter glittering sparks already tower
Over the whole city
Quivering like seaweed
The mass of flames spurts forward
Popping up in the dense smoke
Crawling out, wreathed in fire
Countless human beings on all fours
In a heap of embers that erupt and subside
Hair rent, rigid in death
There smoulders a curse


The Mahabharata circa 1000 B.C.
 
Danbones
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

It was one of the stupidest things that anyone had seen and we still laugh about it 105 years later. It wasn't so funny for the poor souls at the Second Battle of Ypres who had to "dig in" using shovels with holes in the during a battle. Needlees to say, those and a lot of very flawed gear were disposed of immediately after that first battle.

Jeepers, a wiener would fit right in there!
 
Curious Cdn
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

Jeepers, a wiener would fit right in there!

You sure do have a problem.
 

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