Prince Harry passes helicopter pilot's course with flying colours


Blackleaf
#1
Prince Harry, 24, has passed his basic helicopter training course.

Harry has been training with the Army Air Corps and sources say he is now likely to opt to fly Lynx support helicopters, rather than Apaches or Gazelles, the two other helicopters used by the Army Air Corps.

Britain is buying 62 new Lynx Wildcat helicopters from AgustaWestland at a cost of £27 million each.

He spent ten weeks fighting in Afghanistan last year, and is eager to return. The authorities aren't too keen to let him go again (they weren't the first time), but like any other soldier Harry is keen to go and fight on the frontline with the rest of the lads.

Meanwhile, Prince William, 27, is training to become an RAF search and rescue pilot.

It can only be a good thing if the grandsons of the Queen - one of whom will one day become King - are fighting for their country, just like their grandparents, the Queen and Prince Phillip, did during WWII.

Prince Phillip, the Queen's husband, served in the Royal Navy during the War, seeing action in the Battle of Cape Matapan, the Battle of Crete and the invasion of Sicily.

The Queen trained as a driver and mechanic in the Auxilary Territorial Service, the women's branch of the British Army, and drove a military truck.

She's the only living Head of State in the world to have served in WWII, before the likes of Obama and Sarkozy were even born.


Prince Harry passes helicopter pilot's course with flying colours

Prince Harry has passed his basic helicopter training course, it can be revealed.

By Andrew Alderson, Chief Reporter
16 Aug 2009
The Telegraph


During his first 40 hours of flying, the Prince has covered take-off, landing, basic helicopter handling and some advanced handling Photo: MOD

The Prince, 24, is to begin his advanced flying training at RAF Shawbury in Shropshire having now successfully completed 40 hours of flying.

Royal aides say the Prince is "delighted" to have passed stage one of his course, while other informed sources say he is now likely to opt to fly Lynx support helicopters, rather than Apaches or Gazelles, the two other helicopters used by the Army Air Corps.

Prince Harry appears to prefer the Lynx. In June, at a photo call at RAF Shawbury also attended by Prince William, the younger royal brother said: "I think the Lynx is more challenging, it's more my cup of tea than the Apache.

"That's how I feel but that might change halfway though." However, he added: "I'll fly wherever I'm told to fly."

Prince Harry secretly spent ten weeks serving in Afghanistan early last year and has spoken of his desire to return to the war-torn country.

But the Lynx has only had a limited role in Afghanistan. By opting to fly the Lynx, Prince Harry may reduce his chances of serving again in the war zone: typically, there are only five in theatre at any one time.

Britain announced in April that it is buying 62 new Lynx Wildcat helicopters from AgustaWestland at a cost of £27 million each, but they will not be available to for use by troops for a few years.

During his first 40 hours of flying, the Prince has covered take-off, landing, basic helicopter handling and some advanced handling, which is mainly to do with emergency situations.

He has also successfully completed advanced ground school, which he found a struggle earlier in the summer.

Advanced flying training will see him undertake a further 40 hours or so of flying, covering the more advanced aspects of flying such as night-flying, 'instrument' flying in bad weather, more emergency drills, and more advanced handling techniques.

The advanced stage of his course will take him into October. If he passes this stage, he will then move from RAF Shawbury to the Army Air Corps' base at Middle Wallop, Hampshire.

If Prince Harry completes his training, he will be awarded his "wings" in March before he is assigned to either the Lynx, Gazelle or Apache for final instructions.

A spokesman for St James's Palace said last night: "Prince Harry has successfully completed basic flying training at RAF Shawbury and now moves to the advanced flying course."

Prince William, 27, who already has his "wings", is training to become an RAF search and rescue pilot.

telegraph.co.uk
Last edited by Blackleaf; Aug 19th, 2009 at 01:39 PM..
 
FiveParadox
#2
Fabulous!

It’s a huge comfort to know that the Canadian head of State’s grandchildren are just as much concerned with the keeping of the global peace as is Her Majesty The Queen of Canada . My congratulations to His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales Lieutenant , The Blues and Royals . The power that the shared monarchy has to unite the peoples of our world has not yet been completely realised—it has the power to unite the constituent members and peoples of one nation, and it has the power to unite several nations together. I can only hope that our neighbours on the international stage come to understand the tremendous advantages that constitutional monarchy accords to a nation, such that can never be reproduced under any other system of government.
 
talloola
#3
My grandfather, who fought in the boer war, and world war one, would have been
very proud of these young lads, as he was of the queen in world war two.
He had freedom of the city of london, and was a true british patriot, born in London, as was my mother.
Good for them, they are not lazy pampered brothers, they are keen and eager
to participate and make a difference.
 
Nuggler
#4
He spent ten weeks fighting in Afghanistan last year, and is eager to return. The authorities aren't too keen to let him go again (they weren't the first time), but like any other soldier Harry is keen to go and fight on the frontline with the rest of the lads.""


Up and attem, Harry me lad. Get in that chopper an go kill a bunch of brown skinned people. Tis war after all. The very security of Brittania is at stake. The commoners are countin on ya.

THE QUEEN, HARRY, HERE'S TO THE QUEEN. KILL FOR THE QUEEN.








Crash and burn you inbred dickhead.





 
Cliffy
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Nuggler View Post


Crash and burn you inbred dickhead

Jeezuz Nuggler, I nearly swallowed my dentures. Too funny.
 
FiveParadox
#6
I think it’s rather disturbing that anyone here would advocate for the death of any soldier, least of all the head of State’s grandson, Nuggler. It’s admirable that His Royal Highness wishes to serve for the greater defense of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth, just as The Queen and Her Majesty’s consort had done, just as do thousands of United Kingdom citizens. I think it’s fantastic that the drive to protect loved ones supercedes any perceived “status”.
 
Cliffy
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by FiveParadox View Post

I think it’s rather disturbing that anyone here would advocate for the death of any soldier, least of all the head of State’s grandson, Nuggler. It’s admirable that His Royal Highness wishes to serve for the greater defense of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth, just as The Queen and Her Majesty’s consort had done, just as do thousands of United Kingdom citizens. I think it’s fantastic that the drive to protect loved ones supercedes any perceived “status”.

Defending the kingdom and the Commonwealth would mean defending it from attack, on home soil. Going over seas to take part in a war on foreign soil is an act of aggression. Prince Harry can stay home and defend his country but as soon as he leaves to fight in in Afghanistan, he is participating in murder, just like Canadian forces are. There is no righteous war, only self defense is an acceptable use of our armed forces.
 
darkbeaver
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by FiveParadox View Post

I think it’s rather disturbing that anyone here would advocate for the death of any soldier, least of all the head of State’s grandson, Nuggler. It’s admirable that His Royal Highness wishes to serve for the greater defense of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth, just as The Queen and Her Majesty’s consort had done, just as do thousands of United Kingdom citizens. I think it’s fantastic that the drive to protect loved ones supercedes any perceived “status”.

What are you advocating? It seems the protection and welfare of those innocents killed in Afghanistan by these same weapons has escaped you. Like Cliffy says the limeys are there murdering brown people for coin and for no other reason.
Screw all them blue bloods pull them down drag them from their foul and fetid lairs and dispense with them once and for all time, like what has been done in the civilized countries.
 
darkbeaver
#9
Crash and burn you inbred dickhead.
 
FiveParadox
#10
I hope that last post wasn’t directed at me, darkbeaver.

It’s funny that you should speak of ‘civilised’—the United Kingdom, and Canada, are beacons to the world of what civil society should be. The British and Canadian presences in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan are there to support the Afghani people and ensure that democracy, rights and freedoms have a chance. Members of the Canadian Forces are not “murderers”—they are executing the orders handed to them by Her Majesty’s Government for Canada , and they are doing so with professionalism and effectiveness, as they should. The protection and welfare of the Afghani people has not escaped me—it is for protection and welfare that Canada has a presence there.

Canada, and the United Kingdom—civilised countries, with constitutional monarchy. Try again.

And I thought I was Liberal.
 
Cliffy
#11
Members of the Canadian Forces are not “murderers”—they are executing the orders handed to them by Her Majesty’s Government for Canada , and they are doing so with professionalism and effectiveness, as they should.

All that statement means to me is that they are professional assassins taking orders and paycheques from the Canadian government. I fail to see how legal sanctioned murder differs than those committed by organized crime. How does one differentiate the two?
 
FiveParadox
#12
The actions being taken by the Canadian Forces are as authorised by The Crown of Canada , and are being done so with the support of the Canadian people and Government to bring about positive change—change recognised as essential by our neighbours on the world stage. It’s unfortunate that there are members here who refuse to recognise that the Afghani people won’t be safe under the reign of terrorists and radicals. How can one suggest that they are progressive and simultaneously condemn an entire people to a torturous existence devoid of fundamental human rights? I have serious issues with the comparison of honest, hard-working soldiers acting to defend Canadian interests, to organised criminals. The accusation, and label, are disgusting and proponents of that ‘perspective’ should be ashamed of their blatent disregard for the rights of women and children.

I guess it’s to be expected of those who would call for Prince Harry’s death, based solely and exclusively on a disagreement over constitutional monarchy as a system of government. It’s extremely telling of the character of a member when they openly advocate for someone’s death, excitedly and with passion, to advance a partisan agenda. Very unfortunate.
 
Nuggler
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by FiveParadox View Post

I think it’s rather disturbing that anyone here would advocate for the death of any soldier, least of all the head of State’s grandson, Nuggler. It’s admirable that His Royal Highness wishes to serve for the greater defense of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth, just as The Queen and Her Majesty’s consort had done, just as do thousands of United Kingdom citizens. I think it’s fantastic that the drive to protect loved ones supercedes any perceived “status”.


Oh BULLSH1T!!

Whomever gave the red, you can sign your name. I'm not coming looking.