Will Trump use NAFTA to force Mexico to pay for the wall?


B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#1
Trump to begin renegotiating NAFTA with leaders of Mexico, Canada



President Donald Trump said Sunday he will begin renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement when he meets with the leaders of Canada and Mexico.

A central promise of Trump's campaign was that he would revamp the 23-year-old trade pact.

At a White House event Sunday, Trump said he had scheduled meetings with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Mexican President Enrique Peņa Nieto. The White House says the meeting with Nieto is set for Jan. 31.

What is NAFTA?

"We're going to start some negotiations having to do with NAFTA," Trump said.

"Anybody ever hear of NAFTA?" he said. "I ran a campaign somewhat based on NAFTA. But we're going to start renegotiating on NAFTA, on immigration, on security at the border."

Convincing Canada and Mexico to renegotiate NAFTA -- or convincing Congress, where majority Republicans have long supported free trade, not to try to block him from withdrawing from the deal -- could be tough tasks.

Former President Barack Obama was critical of NAFTA as a candidate, too. His effort to renegotiate the deal came in the form of the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would have imposed Democratic-favored labor and environmental rules on the countries included in the deal, including Canada and Mexico.

But Trump was sharply critical of the Trans-Pacific Partnership as a candidate, saying he will kill the deal -- which is well within his power, since it has not yet been enacted.

Trump has also pledged to get Mexico to pay for a wall along the United States' southern border -- potentially, he has said, through tariffs. Imposing those border taxes now would violate NAFTA.

Any move to change the terms of NAFTA or withdraw from the deal also runs the risk of being met with retaliatory tariff hikes in other countries -- meaning the cost of goods shipped to the United States could become higher for American consumers, and US companies could lose access to key foreign markets.

source

...or maybe Canada softwood tariffs are paying for the Mexican wall.. WTF??
 
White_Unifier
#2
In martial arts there's the concept of using the opponent's force against him. If pushes you, you pull him. If he pulls you, you push him. Sun Tsus The Art of War teaches a similar concept.

If the uses raises import tariffs against Canada, we should introduce an export tariff against the US at a rate of X USD/kg or litre or kilowatts.

If the US wants to raise the ost of Canadian exports to the US, Canada should oblige.

Why do I propose a tax by weight and units if energy instead if a percentage of market value? Because that would target the export if raw resources the most while leaving software development and other such online exports alone. US industry depends on raw resource exports. If Canada introduced such a tax in retaliation against a US import tariff, it would take the US by surprise and push inflation up in that country so fast the US would be begging Canada to drop our export tariffs.
 
petros
#3
I made a comment on this methodology months ago.

PMEX is going to get nailed or go public.
 
Bar Sinister
No Party Affiliation
#4
The Dumpster might want to check with the thousands of American companies who have a vested interest in NAFTA. If he doesn't he's a fool. Oh, wait a minute...
 
Highball
#5
Doubtful. He may try to portray that after he has the negotiations with the governments of Canada and Mexico. BUT I can tll you now that Mexico will NEVE willing contribute any funds to the crazy idea.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#6
Breaking news on Trump to dispel a viscious myth


Feinstein Hasn't Seen Evidence of Trump-Russia Collusion
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#7
[youtube]6vL4ntaryvA[/youtube]
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#8
If you take a close look at all the skulduggery that goes back and forth across that border, building the wall makes sense, who pays for it is secondary!
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

If you take a close look at all the skulduggery that goes back and forth across that border, building the wall makes sense, who pays for it is secondary!

There is nothing that atrillion dollar wall can do to stop thousands of hundred dollar ladders or a million ten dollar spades.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

There is nothing that atrillion dollar wall can do to stop thousands of hundred dollar ladders or a million ten dollar spades.


I wouldn't be too sure about that! Of course there's going to be the odd guy who can defeat it, but a hefty electric fence along the top of the wall might dissuade a few of them!
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I wouldn't be too sure about that! Of course there's going to be the odd guy who can defeat it, but a hefty electric fence along the top of the wall might dissuade a few of them!

The Mexican dope smugglers will have routes through it jade before it's even finished.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

There is nothing that atrillion dollar wall can do to stop thousands of hundred dollar ladders or a million ten dollar spades.

First off, more than half of the illegals nowadays are overstays on visas, not illegal crossers.

Second, ladders, tunnels, boats. . . none are affected by a wall, though it's nice that we're creating jobs in Mexico.

Third, the wall will never be built. It was only a symbol for race hate, and Trump never intended to build it.

Finally, there is a very simple way to stop illegal immigration, one we will never, ever use.
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post


Finally, there is a very simple way to stop illegal immigration, one we will never, ever use.

Gas chambers? Not likely, anyway.
 
TenPenny
#14
If all the Republicans would stop employing illegal immigrants, maybe they'd stop coming across the border.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

If all the Republicans would stop employing illegal immigrants, maybe they'd stop coming across the border.

That's the simple way. A two-line law:

Section 1: Any person who employs an illegal alien shall be subject to a fine of $10,000 and a term of 30 days incarceration for each such illegal alien employed, sentences to be cumulative and consecutive.

Section 2: No governmental entity shall have the authority to vary or modify the penalties specified in Section 1.

 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#16


#ImpeachTrump
 
MHz
#17
Built with Canadian softwood. Nope.
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/repo...ticle36049782/

U.S. imports of German softwood up tenfold as duties weigh on Canada

U.S. imports of softwood from Germany have grown tenfold in the first half of the year as punishing duties pushed imports of Canadian softwood down.
RBC Capital Markets analyst Paul Quinn estimates Canadian lumber producers have plunked down $500-million so far in countervailing and antidumping duties since the spring.
The U.S. alleges Canada unfairly subsidizes its softwood industry and has slapped on import taxes averaging 26.75 per cent as punishment.
Canada disputes the U.S. assessment but cannot officially challenge the U.S. tariffs until after final decisions are made about the level of duties to be imposed some time this fall.
Canada and the U.S. are trying to negotiate a new softwood trade deal to replace one that expired in 2015, but thus far have been unable to come up with a plan acceptable to the U.S. Lumber Coalition.
In the meantime, Canadian companies are paying duties and prices are rising, making imports from places like Germany suddenly more attractive.
“When Canadian lumber is more reasonably priced it’s not that viable of an option,” said Jerry Howard, CEO of the National Home Builders Association in the U.S.. “The Germans this time were poised to take advantage of it and I think that they have.”
In the first six months of this year, German softwood imports into the U.S. soared more than 900 per cent over the same period last year.
Germany’s share of imports rose from 0.35 per cent in the first six months of 2016, to 3.6 per cent this year.
Overall, U.S. imports of softwood were up three per cent over the first six months of the year.
However Canadian shipments were down one per cent.
As a result, Canada’s share of U.S. softwood imports fell to 92 per cent from 96 per cent.
Richard Walker, a spokesman for the Forest Products Association of Canada, said Canada’s softwood exports were growing before the duties were imposed at the end of April. In May and June they fell.
“It’s the American consumer who has been paying the price to date as lumber prices have gone up in anticipation of the duties,” said Walker.
Germany wasn’t the only beneficiary. Austrian softwood imports were up 178 per cent, Romania was up 141 per cent, Russia 42 per cent and Sweden 41 per cent.
Howard estimates the softwood dispute has pushed prices for home builders up 20 per cent, which means new homes are costing U.S. consumers more and more Americans will be priced out of the market.
“If our own forestry practices in the United States were more modernized and more state of the art we could probably produce almost enough lumber to satisfy our needs, but right now we have to supplement our own domestic harvests somewhere,” he said.
Quinn used the average duties imposed and multiplied it by the amount of wood exported to estimate as of now, Canadian producers have paid close to $500-million in duties as of August.
The second quarter reports for six of the country’s biggest softwood producers show the impact of the duties up to the end of June. Canfor deposited the most at $34.8-million, followed by West Fraser which paid $34-million. Resolute has deposited $4-million, Interfor $7.3-million, Western Forest Products $9.2-million and Conifex $4.6-million.
Most companies are being asked to pay the duties retroactively for 90 days. Interfor’s quarterly report suggests that could amount to another $11.4-million for it alone.
The duties deposited are held in trust by the United States until all Canada’s appeals are completed. If Canada and the U.S. reach a settlement agreement, that agreement will likely dictate where those duties end up.
The last time there was a softwood trade dispute, the U.S. collected $5.2-billion in duties over five years and the settlement in 2006 included a clause that the U.S. would repay $4.5-billion of it.
Report Typo/Error
 
White_Unifier
#18
If the US insists on import duties on Canadian lumber, Canada should impose export duties on Canadian exports to the US at x$/kg and x/kWh. If a duty will be imposed on Canadian products being exported to the US, I'd rather the Canadian and not the US government collect that tax. I'd rather no tariff to be sure. But if the US forces our hand, we might as well be the ones collecting that tax.
 

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