2 years after nuclear disaster, Japan spawns freaky fruits and veggies


Locutus
#1


It might be wise to steer clear of vegetables from Japan's Fukushima area for, oh, say a few hundred years. A Korean website assembled this image collection of produce from towns and villages surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. And they are NOT pretty pictures. From Siamese-twinned corn cobs to what can only be called peaches with elephantiasis, the region's agriculture appears to have taken a heavy radiation hit from the nuclear disaster in 2011. It's not clear yet what effect eating the produce might have on the population, but you never know. It could be pretty dangerous, but you never know — in an ideal world, maybe it could give you superpowers.

Fukushima vegetables mutated in viral photos, possibly due to radiation

more tasty food:

http://imgur.com/a/Ne2bP#0
 
karrie
#2
The second picture in, the woman holding the tomatoe with green sprigs coming out of it, is natural. The seeds inside of it have germinated, and those are, literally, tomatoe plants coming out. It has nothing to do with nuclear fallout. There is also a picture of a dandelion with an elongated head that is not uncommon to see around here. I suspect many of these fruits and veggies in fact, are not out of the norm.
 
Nuggler
#3
the cucumber with attachments is kinda neat: Nippon tikkerer. ??
 
Palindrome
+1
#4  Top Rated Post
Most of them seem to be a result of excess replication. The odd double peach or cherry is seen in normal conditions (as are conjoined twins in animal species) - there just seems to be a lot more of it going on there. That, in itself, doesn't make the fruit dangerous to eat - but the radiation levels are probably still way too high, which does.
I have never seen tomato or cucumber seeds start germinating inside fresh fruit. More accelerated reproduction, i suppose.
 
karrie
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Palindrome View Post

Most of them seem to be a result of excess replication. The odd double peach or cherry is seen in normal conditions (as are conjoined twins in animal species) - there just seems to be a lot more of it going on there. That, in itself, doesn't make the fruit dangerous to eat - but the radiation levels are probably still way too high, which does.
I have never seen tomato or cucumber seeds start germinating inside fresh fruit. More accelerated reproduction, i suppose.

radiation usually kills off reproduction, not accelerates it. I've had to throw away more than one tomatoe because the seeds inside had sprouted. Tomatoes are the only ones I've had it happen with though, both from the store, and from my garden.
 
L Gilbert
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Palindrome View Post

Most of them seem to be a result of excess replication. The odd double peach or cherry is seen in normal conditions (as are conjoined twins in animal species) - there just seems to be a lot more of it going on there. That, in itself, doesn't make the fruit dangerous to eat - but the radiation levels are probably still way too high, which does.
I have never seen tomato or cucumber seeds start germinating inside fresh fruit. More accelerated reproduction, i suppose.

Yep. The radiation levels up to 50 km from the site as of about a week ago were measured to be 1.7 million Becquerels. That's still pretty high.
BTW, we have had tomatoes, carrots, spuds, etc. with "babies" attached to them.
 
lone wolf
#7
Monsato patented?
 
karrie
#8
oh, I almost lied when I said only tomatoes.... my kids always fight over the pepper babies we find.
 
L Gilbert
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

Monsato patented?

Nope. lol
 
spaminator
#10


mutated camel toes?
 
Palindrome
#11
Quote:

BTW, we have had tomatoes, carrots, spuds, etc. with "babies" attached to them.

Yes, little fruit inside big fruit, which is an undeveloped twin. Sprouting plants are different: they're the next generation.
 

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