"The west wants out": Separatist sentiments growing in Alberta


Twin_Moose
Conservative
+2
#1081
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

What does $40K buy? A culvert install? 10km of road paint? New flags on Fed buildings?

Pretty much, former Enviro Barbie and now build it Barbie has issued tonnes of them she got nailed a couple of times for issuing under $40k contracts to the same contractor for the same project already. So you know she is using the accountability rule to do bigger projects by issuing on going small contracts to circumvent the procurement process

Quote:

The Procurement Process - Buyandsell.gc.ca
https://buyandsell.gc.ca/.../the-procurement-process
For requirements below $25,000 for goods, and below $40,000 for services and construction contracts, including all applicable taxes, contracting officers may request quotations from suppliers directly. These requirements are considered by PWGSC as low dollar value procurement.

 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+1
#1082
Quote: Originally Posted by Decapoda View Post

Since March 1st, only three municipal projects worth roughly $3.8
million have been approved for funding by your government. Meanwhile, an additional 123
municipal projects representing over $590 million of infrastructure spending are awaiting
approval from the federal government. Many of these projects are “shovel ready” as
requested by your government, yet the time to put shovels in the ground has come and
gone as construction season in Saskatchewan nears its end. It is greatly concerning that
these projects, representing real jobs and real investment in communities, have sat on a
desk for months waiting for approval.

Why do these Liberals have such an aversion to investing in infrastructure instead of their preference of simply giving away billions of dollars they don't have? Why have we still not heard from Cathrine McKenna about the missing $145 billion dollars in Liberal infrastructure "investment" that can't be accounted for? Why are people not demanding accountability from these incompetent buffoons? Where's the money Cate??

Not all infrastructure projects count either. we have a fire hall was due to start construction when COVID hit so it was postponed. Firehalls in BC are not approved infrastructure projects.
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+1
#1083
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

What does $40K buy? A culvert install? 10km of road paint? New flags on Fed buildings?

Political junket to somewhere warm.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#1084
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Political junket to somewhere warm.

When I was working for the government, you could always tell by the schedule for bilateral conferences:

Ottawa - summer, bosses - winter, staff.
Mexico City - summer, staff - winter, bosses.
 
JamesBondo
#1085
Summer is not a good time to visit Mexico, I went in the early fall and was faced with 40degC days.
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+1
#1086
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

When I was working for the government, you could always tell by the schedule for bilateral conferences:
Ottawa - summer, bosses - winter, staff.
Mexico City - summer, staff - winter, bosses.

Many of our politicians and senior staff like to have important meetings in the country they were born in when the weather is crappy here.
 
Ron in Regina
Free Thinker
+1
#1087
I'm posting the below link not because I'm in favour of separation, but I'm opposed to the shit attitude displayed by some with respect to the sentiment of alienation in Western Canada as to it's reality or not. It's real, & someone doesn't have to be a traitor to recognize it as being real.

http://nationalpost.com/opinion/herb...umbers-show-it

Alberta’s demand for a “fair deal” in Confederation is not taken as a serious issue outside of that province. Some of that complacency comes from a perspective that despite the large transfers of tax revenues to the rest of the country, Alberta has gained from being part of Canada. Financial Post columnist Kevin Carmichael stated that, “There are some Albertans who seem to think they would be better off as their own country. Maybe, but only because the province has enjoyed the benefits of being a member of a stable, diversified economy for more than a century.”

To understand whether Alberta is losing out economically as part of Confederation, or whether Albertans are ingrates who cannot see the importance of Canada for their economic success, as Carmichael suggests, Kent Fellows, a research associate at the University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy, and I investigated two questions: How important is trade with Alberta for the rest of Canada? And how important is trade with the rest of Canada for Alberta?

Beyond the direct impact of energy exports on the national economy, Alberta is important to the economies of other provinces as a market for their goods. Alberta imports from other provinces and territories goods and services for consumption, and intermediate inputs for Alberta’s production of goods and services. To give a few examples:

In 2015, Alberta imported $322 million worth of processed meat products from Ontario and $210 million worth of processed dairy products from Quebec. Alberta also imported $2.2 billion worth of natural gas from British Columbia (the majority of which was likely exported from Alberta along with Alberta-produced gas, mostly to the United States, with smaller but significant volumes going to Ontario).

Using a computational model of the Canadian economy, we investigated the impact of higher trade barriers between Alberta and the other provinces. We simulated the impact of imposing 100 per cent tariffs on interprovincial imports into Alberta and 100 per cent tariffs imposed by other provinces on imports from Alberta. Our modelling assumes that Alberta maintains the Canadian dollar, and that the trade cost increases have no impact on the Canada-U.S. dollar exchange rate.

To see the relative importance of oil and gas exports to other provinces, we also modelled increases in interprovincial export costs applied only to crude oil and natural gas from Alberta to other Canadian provinces. We believe our modelling evaluates the trade impacts of Alberta seceding, or at least having much greater independence, from the rest of Canada.

The rest of Canada clearly benefits from relatively unfettered trade with Alberta. Our model suggests that for the rest of the country, the value of trade attributable to having Alberta as part of the national market is $24 billion, or around 2 per cent of gross domestic product.

The value of trade with Alberta is 20 per cent higher than the value of annual federal fiscal transfers from Alberta to the rest of Canada over the past 20 years (nearly $20 billion per year). Those fiscal transfers from Alberta, in addition to the trade values, come in large part from the higher incomes and tax collections arising from international energy exports.

If Carmichael sees Alberta benefiting from being part of a stable, diversified national economy, then he and other Canadians need to recognize that Canada benefits from Alberta being a prosperous energy exporter. It is time to give up on the fallacy of the “resource curse” that is leading to disastrous federal policies.

Carmichael could be right that Alberta benefits from being part of the Canadian economy, but Alberta pays for that benefit, unlike Canadians in other provinces. Alberta’s GDP is $20 billion (or six per cent) higher with interprovincial trade than if it were excluded from the national market.

This value is approximately equal to the loss of GDP represented by its federal fiscal transfers to the rest of Canada. Alberta’s loss in GDP is due to lost exports to other provinces, while the rest of Canada’s GDP loss results from other provinces relying on more expensive goods imported from each other, or from international markets.

The rest of Canada has much more to lose from an independent Alberta than Alberta does
, meaning it might make sense the rest of Canada to consider a fair deal for Alberta to keep Confederation whole. The rest of Canada stands to lose $20 billion in annual fiscal transfers from Alberta and $24 billion from lost interprovincial trade if it were no longer part of the federation.

Alberta, on the other hand, would lose $20 billion in interprovincial trade, but would keep an equal value in net taxes no longer transferred to the federal government . Should Alberta successfully negotiate a tariff with the rest of Canada that’s less than 100 per cent, then Alberta would see a net gain from independence.

In seeking a “fair deal” from Confederation, Albertans are testing the foundations of the Canadian federation. Should the federal government choose not to bring more balance between the costs that federal policies, decisions and inaction imposes on Alberta and the rents it extracts from the province through its fiscal arrangements, Alberta separatists could find growing political support in the province. Secession, if it occurs, will result if enough Albertans find being treated like a disrespected cash cow intolerable.
 
Hoid
#1088
Because "the west" is Alberta.
 
Ron in Regina
Free Thinker
+2
#1089
Because Alberta is an "Example" used in this case, & yes Alberta is a part of Western Canada. Is this better?

 
Hoid
#1090
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

Because Alberta is an "Example" used in this case, & yes Alberta is a part of Western Canada. Is this better?

That has nothing to do with "western" separation.

It is an impressive cut and paste though.
 
Hoid
#1091
BTW didn't the Libs just announce they are going to go with small nuke reactors to achieve their carbon neutral goals?

Isn't that what Moe wanted?

Where's his thank you letter?
 
Hoid
#1092
Also shouldn't Premier Moe be in jail?

https://saskatoon.ctvnews.ca/23-year...post-1.5134917

'23 years and I find out our premier killed my mother': Scott Moe apologizes for fatal crash following Facebook post
 
Ron in Regina
Free Thinker
+1
#1093
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

BTW didn't the Libs just announce they are going to go with small nuke reactors to achieve their carbon neutral goals?

Isn't that what Moe wanted?

Where's his thank you letter?

I've heard that rumor that the Libs are now in support of small nuclear reactors....in Ontario.

Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Also shouldn't Premier Moe be in jail?

https://saskatoon.ctvnews.ca/23-year...post-1.5134917

'23 years and I find out our premier killed my mother': Scott Moe apologizes for fatal crash following Facebook post

That's a skeleton in his closet that he'll have to deal with. http://forums.canadiancontent.net/sh...d.php?t=168404


Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

http://www.cjme.com/2020/09/26/saskparty-and-ndp-field-candidates-in-all-ridings/
Ahead of the writ drop, both the Saskatchewan Party and opposition NDP have a full slate of 61 candidates. The NDP announced its final 12 candidates on Friday. The Sask. Party announced its final candidate last Saturday. Both parties have disclosed the criminal past of candidates including impaired driving convictions and pardons.

The NDP candidates with convictions include:

  • Carter Antoine, who is running for a seat in Yorkton-Melville, was convicted of impaired driving in 2017
  • Bhajan Brar, for Regina Pasqua, was convicted of dangerous driving causing bodily harm in 2011
  • Ken Burton, for Moosomin, was convicted of impaired driving in 1973
  • Bonnie Galenzowski, for Melville-Saltcoats, was convicted of impaired driving in 1982
  • Rod McCorriston, for Carrot River Valley, was convicted of impaired driving in 1980
  • Lyle Whitefish, for Saskatchewan Rivers, was convicted of impaired driving in 2011

The Sask. Party candidates with an impaired driving conviction are:
  • Terry Dennis, MLA for Canora-Pelly, was convicted 1978 and 2001
  • Don McMorris, MLA for Indian Head Milestone, was convicted in 2016
  • Terry Jenson, for Martensville Warman, was convicted in 1994
  • Scott Moe, premier and MLA for Rosthern Shellbrook, was convicted in 1992
  • Manny Sadhra, for Saskatoon Fairview, was convicted in 2008
  • Eric Olauson, for Saskatoon University, was convicted in 1992 and 1993

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskat...rash-1.4280677
 
Durry
+1
#1094
I don’t see a way out for us anytime soon, if ever.
As long as Ont & Quebec hold on to their large population base, under the current parliamentary scheme, we will continue to be screwed, so we just have to learn to suck it up.