It's time to stand up to patronising Tusk and Juncker


Blackleaf
#1
We have been too accommodating and way too generous so far. Itís time to pull the rug from under their feet. Itís time to tell the pygmies: No Deal...

ROD LIDDLE Itís time to stand up to the patronising Donald Tusk and Jean-Claude Juncker and do a direct deal with countries which are being bullied by the EU

The two faced 'no progress' comments need to stop otherwise it's no deal


COMMENT
By Rod Liddle, Sun Columnist
28th September 2017

TELL you what. Iím really looking forward to the day the British Government gets tired of being blackmailed by pygmies. Because Iím tired of it already.

The format for the Brexit talks is always the same. The politicians get together for a meeting.


Rod Liddle says he's tired of Brexit negotiations with Jean-Claude Juncker already

Afterwards, the UK representatives ó Theresa May or David Davis or Boris Johnson ó emerge and say nice things about their counterparts.

And how the meeting was constructive and things are moving forwards.

And within a minute some jumped-up little panjandrum from the EU appears before the cameras to be insulting about the people heís just been talking to. And then insulting to the people of the UK.

This has happened time and time again. The half-cut arch-idiot, Jean-Claude Juncker, did it. A couple of weeks ago it was the turn of some Irish lowlife called Phil Hogan, who stuck the boot into Boris. Philís presumably forgotten how the UK bailed out his countryís wrecked economy in 2012.

And this time itís that perpetually smirking Pole, Donald Tusk. Patronising and rude.

He described Theresa May, condescendingly, as ďmore constructive, more realisticĒ. But said that talks were not really progressing.


Pathetic Tusk shows his colours when the media microphones come out

Arenít they, Donald? Well hereís the thing. Letís stop them. Letís pull out and tell them to stuff it.

These EU officials are determined to do two things. First, screw as much money out of us as possible. Money which, legally, we do not owe. Second, make the UK an ďexampleĒ to other countries which might want to get the hell out of the rapidly sinking ship that is the EU.

So, itís time to call their bluff. Exit the Brexit talks with the EU pygmies. Tell them theyíre getting nowt. Not a single penny.

Threaten to shove a nice strong tariff on imports from within the EU. See how the manufacturers in Germany and France and Spain like that.

Then cut out the middle man. Go direct to the elected heads of states with whom we wish to cut a decent trade deal.

Offer preferential trade deals to countries which are currently being bullied by the EU Stasi ó the likes of Poland, Hungary and Slovakia. Start building up a few strategic allies.

And tell Angela Merkel in Germany and Emmanuel Macron in France that we welcome their countryís goods so long as a reciprocal trade deal can be signed right now, no messing around. Otherwise itís tariff time.


We're the ones that should be looking exasperated with this pathetic display, says Rod Liddle

We import much, much, more from France and Germany than we sell to them. So that should concentrate their minds a little.

And both countries are in political trouble. In Germany, Merkelís party lost loads of seats to an anti-EU, anti-immigrant party (which the BBC seems to think is composed of Nazis, werewolves and goblins. No, itís not. Itís composed of people who, like us, have had enough.)

While in France, the electors have woken up to the reality that Macron is a charlatan. He is hugely unpopular.

We have been too accommodating and way too generous so far. Itís time to pull the rug from under their feet. Itís time to tell the pygmies: No Deal.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/456351...iddle-opinion/
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#2
Ah, just tusk them onto the junk pile.

Yeah, I think developing allies and even an alternate trading block ( if not just the realistic threat of one) might just be a good tactic.

I think that the author of the article has a decent sensible opinion.
(though Tariffs might not be easy on the peeps)

Possibly there are other countries wishing to sell similar goods to Britain, without the baggage attached.
Last edited by Danbones; Sep 30th, 2017 at 04:41 AM..
 
Blackleaf
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

Ah, just tusk him them onto the junk pile.

Yeah, I think developing allies and even an alternate trading block ( if not just the realistic threat of one) might just be a good tactic.

Britain can make good allies out the the Eastern European EU Member States who spent decades being bullied by the Soviets and whose people aren't too enamoured at the thought of now being bullied by the EU. The Scandinavians can be our great allies, too (Britain is often considered to be a Scandinavian country anyway).

We can be the New Europe, forging ahead in prosperity and democracy and trade. Let the rest - Old Europe, led by Germany and France and held together by sycophantic politicians in places like Rome, Vienna and Dublin - sink into the mire.
 
Danbones
Free Thinker
#4
There are probably a lot of peeps in those "under the thumb" countries that will change ship at the earliest opportunity as well, they just need the first wave to get them rolling.
 
justlooking
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Britain can make good allies out the the Eastern European EU Member States


***coughcoughMunichcoughcough***

Maybe you have forgotten. They haven't.

Anyway, the Brits should walk away from the EU.

Right now.

No deal, no money, no nothing.. then dare them to start a tariff regime.

Shame the last UK election went so badly, May really screwed herself into a corner.
 
Blackleaf
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by justlooking View Post

***coughcoughMunichcoughcough***

Maybe you have forgotten. They haven't.

Anyway, the Brits should walk away from the EU.

Right now.

No deal, no money, no nothing.. then dare them to start a tariff regime.

Shame the last UK election went so badly, May really screwed herself into a corner.

I've been saying for months that we shouldn't bother with negotiations, because they aren't really negotiations - basically, the two sides get together round the table, EU negotiator Barnier demands that Britain does this and pays that, then gets all worked up when Britain's negotiator Davis says what things Britain wants. Barnier then holds a press conference attacking the British for not playing ball and "not making enough progress." The EU doesn't want to negotiate. It just gives a set of demands that it expects Britain to obey.