If you live near a prison or correctional facility how safe do you feel?


CBC News
#1
Saskatchewan's minister of public safety has ordered an investigation into why 15 hours passed before authorities alerted the public about a prison break by six inmates.
One of six escapees was caught a short time after fleeing the Regina Correctional Centre on Sunday night at about 10 p.m., but five were still on the loose Tuesday.
A Canada-wide warrant was issued for the five escaped inmates, described as "dangerous and possibly armed" at a Monday afternoon news conference where the public was first alerted about the incident.
With the Trans-Canada Highway nearby, police acknowledge that the inmates could have travelled far in the hours since their escape.
Read full story
If you live near a prison or correctional facility how safe do you feel?


More...
 
lone wolf
#2
Do you think they're going to stick around? They're full of piss, vinegar and the urge to run. Don't leave the car unlocked and they're gone....
 
karrie
#3
The only prison I've ever lived near was surrounded by a knee high white fence. I just assumed that the fence was colour coded to the collar that fit the crime, and these guys weren't athletic enough to lift a leg over, let alone put anyone at risk.
 
Ron in Regina
#4
I grew up with that prison in Regina visible from my back yard and separated from it by several
miles of wheat field. We would have seen those Escapee's coming for a couple of hours, if this had
happened back in the early '70's. That wheat field is now an industrial area.

A locked car is not a deterrent for some thief in a hurry. I've had to replace several steering columns
in my lifetime, and have had to drive vehicles with busted out steering columns while hunting for new
(OK...used) replacement parts. Given a hammer (or a rock, or just something compact and heavy)
and a Bic pen (or a screwdriver, or just something ridged and slender) and most adults out here can
start most cars (with a plastic steering column but predating the anti-theft chipped keys and such).
A locked car would have only added a small portion of a minute to the time it would have taken one
of these guys to steal a car. A car would just be a quick way for these guys to get across town.

These guys will have pit in with relatives or fellow NSK right here in Regina, or not too very far from it.
Living here, I would have liked to have know these guys where on the loose in a reasonable time frame.
If after a head count Sunday night, pictures of these criminals had been broadcast on the local TV
stations at 15 minute intervals...I believe these guys would have been caught Sunday night. I didn't even
know there was a prison break until Monday at noon, and I'd had my radio on for about five hours at that
point on Monday... These five runners are all "NSK" (Native Syndicate Killers) and have a support base
out here on the prairies, so I don't think they've run too far away at all .

I believe that the fecal matter has impacted the rotary device for Corrections already, and they have
announced that the procedure is changing with respect to the time frame the Public will be notified
with to any future prison breaks. Lots of backpedaling is being done today....
 
lone wolf
#5
The unlocked car is so the insurance creep doesn't steal it a second time....
 
Ron in Regina
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

The unlocked car is so the insurance creep doesn't steal it a second time....

Oh...
 
Ron in Regina
#7
I believe that the fecal matter has impacted the rotary device for Corrections already, and they have
announced that the procedure is changing with respect to the time frame the Public will be notified
with to any future prison breaks. Lots of backpedaling is being done over the last several days....


Stories keep changing and butts keep getting covered and recovered. It's a real mess. Bizarre. Check
out the link below to the latest story about this in the "Leader Post."

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpo...3-be796f1ee683
 
Ron in Regina
#8
Now the official information door has closed. No room left for any more official foot in official mouth.
The killers are still on the run several days later. The government even screwed up "shutting up." I
believe that (at least out here) society as a whole feels a whole lot less safe living near a correctional
facility than it did a week ago.

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpo...3-3935e9a35ec7
 
Ron in Regina
#9
Almost a week after the escape, they caught one out of the five. One block over and four blocks
down from my house. The Minister of Public Safety & Policing isn't saying anything, and is making
sure that nobody else in Government is saying anything either...
 
lone wolf
#10
...which can be interpreted to "We messed up" ... because they're always so loud about patting themselves on the back when they do something right.
 
Ron in Regina
#11
Two weeks later. Nobody is saying a thing. The silence is deafening. Four of the convicts
are still on the run. I'm willing to bet someone a quarter (of a dollar) that when/if they finally
catch another one of these escapee's, it'll be within 100km of the correctional facility here
in Regina, if not in the City of Regina itself.
 
dfrizzy
#12
I live pretty darn close to one, and I feel safe. No reason not too.
 
Ron in Regina
#13
Somebody could have been a quarter of a dollar richer... Two caught in Winnipeg. Still
two killers unaccounted for, and I stand by my bet that they're in Regina or within 100km
of Regina.
 
Ron in Regina
#14
Guards failed to notice months of tunneling: jail break report


By Jana G. Pruden, Leader-Post March 12, 2009 10:01 PM
Source: Guards failed to notice months of tunneling: jail break report

REGINA -- A nail clipper, bored and angry inmates, poor management and a culture
of complacency, blaming, and disrespect among correctional workers created a
perfect environment for a successful jailbreak, according to a bluntly critical report
released by the government on Thursday.

The report about the Aug. 24 escape of six dangerous inmates from the Regina
Provincial Correctional Centre paints a picture of a facility in crisis, and raises
serious questions about the operation and management of the jail.

Indeed, even the inmates involved in the escape appear to have been surprised by
their feat.

“We didn’t think we would get away with it,” one of the six is quoted in the report
as saying. “We started working on it. It was something to do and we just kept at
it. When we didn’t get caught, we picked our night and just went.”

The report, prepared by an independent three-person investigation team and
censored by Deputy Minister of Corrections, Public Safety and Policing Al Hilton,
was released by government Thursday.

The comprehensive 139-page report says inmates began engineering the escape in
May, when they placed a table in front of a heat register in the corridor of the 3A
range, in the 1960s era portion of the facility. While inmates played cards at the
table to block the view of correctional officers, other inmates toiled underneath,
first using a modified nail clipper to remove the heating register, then tearing
through the steel back plate and chipping away at the exterior brick wall.

On the night of Aug. 24 , the inmates smashed through the weakened outer wall
with a steel shower rod, and lowered themselves to the ground with ropes braided
out of blankets and bed sheets.

The six inmates placed winter coats over the razor wire fence , and used additional
ropes to climb down to the ground. They then scaled two more fences and fled.

The first of the escapees was recaptured within hours, and the last nearly a month
later. The investigation team, led by longtime Correctional Service of Canada
official William Peet, was commissioned in the wake of the bold jailbreak.

But the most damning aspects of the report pertain not to the escape, but to what
happened before and after the actual event.

The report points out that inmates worked on the hole for a period of four
months, during which time at least 87 different guards supervised the unit.

“It is accepted that an inmate or a group of inmates can deceive a Corrections
Worker or a group of Corrections Workers on any given shift,” the report says.
“The (investigation team) does not accept that an entire corridor of inmates can
deceive the large number of Corrections Workers that supervised the unit over an
extended period.” (Yeah...for FOUR MONTHS)

The report says there were also clear indications of the plan as long as two months
before the escape — including a tip that inmates were “going to be out soon” and
were “doing it like in the movies” — but critical pieces of information were not
followed up adequately by jail management. Several correctional workers also
suspected inmates were “up to something” but didn’t interview inmates, the
report found.

Corrections workers didn’t realize there had been an escape for more than an
hour, and only discovered what had occurred after being contacted by Regina
police. Though the initial lockdown went relatively smoothly, the report found that
what followed was an “uncontrolled and confused response,” which included a lack
of direction from management, a 15-hour delay in notifying the media and
public , and some inmates being confined in restraints for an excessively long
period.

The report says some staff members subsequently interfered with evidence at the
scene and deliberately omitted information relevant to the escape in their reports,
later telling the investigation team they didn’t want to “rat out on a brother or
sister.”

The report identifies not only a very poor relationship between inmates and
corrections workers, but an “adversarial and controversial” relationship between
corrections workers and management.

The report highlights the dangerous combination of distracted guards, who had
access to the Internet and recreational reading material at their posts, and
bored inmates, many of whom were sitting on remand with nothing to do.

“When people have large blocks of time on their hands with nothing constructive to
do, they tend to gravitate towards doing whatever they can get away with,” the
report says. “In this instance, it was digging their way out of the facility.”

The report also puts some blame on the poor condition and maintenance of the
facility, noting the “sense of neglect” demonstrated in the peeling paint, holes,
cracks, and graffiti.

“Operationally, Unit 3A epitomizes a disorderly environment and is a breeding
ground for disorder and criminal activity,” the report says.

The report also isolates a number of broader issues around the way staff are
interacting with inmates at the facility, including a fundamental lack of knowledge
about the principles of incarceration and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

“As a staff member one can despise the crimes alleged to have been committed by
inmates however it is expected that they be treated humanely and with dignity,”
the report said. “It is not the place for Corrections Workers to judge the offender
and therefore treat the offender in a manner that is not consistent with the
Ministry’s mission.”
____________________

This is a demonstration of a culture of Unionized Government Employee's
at their very absolute worst. Watch the excuses fly now. This'll be rich...
Where do you hit several winter coats, and many-many ropes made out of
sheets and blankets in a prison in August??? I guess in the same place that
you hide a HOLE IN THE WALL...as long as nobody bothers to check.

Somebody had to call the Police, who had to call the Prison, who then had
to go and check to find out that Six Prisoners left an hour before through a
HOLE IN THE WALL.
____________________







____________________
 
VanIsle
#15
Because it happened there doesn't mean it happens everywhere. There are a lot of break outs in one in the Fraser Valley as well. Don't know why but probably lax correctional officers. I live near one here, not too near but it doesn't worry me. The last place they want to be is near the jail. It's only medium security here so most of them are not much more than a touch above petty thieves. The baddies get shipped out.
 
JLM
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by CBC News View Post

Saskatchewan's minister of public safety has ordered an investigation into why 15 hours passed before authorities alerted the public about a prison break by six inmates.
One of six escapees was caught a short time after fleeing the Regina Correctional Centre on Sunday night at about 10 p.m., but five were still on the loose Tuesday.
A Canada-wide warrant was issued for the five escaped inmates, described as "dangerous and possibly armed" at a Monday afternoon news conference where the public was first alerted about the incident.
With the Trans-Canada Highway nearby, police acknowledge that the inmates could have travelled far in the hours since their escape.
Read full story
If you live near a prison or correctional facility how safe do you feel?


More...

Prisons these days house the more elite in society like Madoff and Pockington, people who aren't any kind of physical threat, so why would anyone worry? All the bad asses are on the street under strict 2AM- 5AM curfew.
 
Ron in Regina
#17
I lived in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan for several years where we had
the Woman's Provincial Institute, A Men's Provincial Institute, the Men's
Federal Institute, and a large Youth Facility. Never felt unsafe....

What happened in Regina...what was allowed to happen, and how it was
dealt with, and is still being dealt with....really p*sses me off though. Five
of the six excapees here where in on remand for Murder or Attempted
Murder. These where not elite white-collar criminals.

Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post


The report points out that inmates worked on the hole for a period of four
months, during which time at least 87 different guards supervised the unit.

Corrections workers didn’t realize there had been an escape for more than an
hour, and only discovered what had occurred after being contacted by Regina
police. Though the initial lockdown went relatively smoothly, the report found that
what followed was an “uncontrolled and confused response,” which included a lack
of direction from management, a 15-hour delay in notifying the media and
public , and some inmates being confined in restraints for an excessively long
period.

The report says some staff members subsequently interfered with evidence at the
scene and deliberately omitted information relevant to the escape in their reports,
later telling the investigation team they didn’t want to “rat out on a brother or
sister.”

The report identifies not only a very poor relationship between inmates and
corrections workers, but an “adversarial and controversial” relationship between
corrections workers and management.

The report highlights the dangerous combination of distracted guards, who had
access to the Internet and recreational reading material at their posts, and
bored inmates, many of whom were sitting on remand with nothing to do.

“When people have large blocks of time on their hands with nothing constructive to
do, they tend to gravitate towards doing whatever they can get away with,” the
report says. “In this instance, it was digging their way out of the facility.”

 
Tyr
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by CBC News View Post

Saskatchewan's minister of public safety has ordered an investigation into why 15 hours passed before authorities alerted the public about a prison break by six inmates.
One of six escapees was caught a short time after fleeing the Regina Correctional Centre on Sunday night at about 10 p.m., but five were still on the loose Tuesday.
A Canada-wide warrant was issued for the five escaped inmates, described as "dangerous and possibly armed" at a Monday afternoon news conference where the public was first alerted about the incident.
With the Trans-Canada Highway nearby, police acknowledge that the inmates could have travelled far in the hours since their escape.
Read full story
If you live near a prison or correctional facility how safe do you feel?


More...

I grew up near the "big 5" in Kingston, Ont. Escapee's are generally pretty intent on putting as much distance as possible between themselves and the prison. They tended to head to Toronto to try and get lost in the underground and allyways
 
VanIsle
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

I lived in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan for several years where we had
the Woman's Provincial Institute, A Men's Provincial Institute, the Men's
Federal Institute, and a large Youth Facility. Never felt unsafe....

What happened in Regina...what was allowed to happen, and how it was
dealt with, and is still being dealt with....really p*sses me off though. Five
of the six excapees here where in on remand for Murder or Attempted
Murder. These where not elite white-collar criminals.

Any staff members that did not "rat out" their co-workers should be fired. That being said, all facilities are short of correctional officers so I guess at the very least, they should be transferred. Surprize lock-downs should be happening at least once a week as the stuff they find on inmates is amazing. If they were doing their hourly checks and doing lock-downs, this situation would never have happened. All their little "tools" would have been found. Finding their tools should have led to the job they were working on. I don't understand why the correctional officers each have computers. They don't need them. A few need to be around for writing reports but that's all.
 
petros
#20
Quote:

If you live near a prison or correctional facility how safe do you feel?


I live in the same neighbourhood those inmates lived in prior to spending time at PCC Regina. How can 5 more possible make a difference to the thousands currently applying their illegal trades and crimes as free individuals.

The last thing an escapee wants is to gain atention by commiting more crimes and being sent back even longer than initally sentenced to.
 
Ron in Regina
#21
Corrections needs professionalism


By Murray Mandryk, Saskatchewan News Network; Regina Leader-Post
March 13, 2009 Source: Corrections needs professionalism

Certainly, William Peet's report on the Aug. 24 escape from the Provincial
Correctional Centre in Regina proves there's enough blame to go around.

A bit of it should go to Corrections and Public Safety Minister Darryl Hickie, who
wasn't exactly vindicated over the 15 hours it took his ministry to inform the public
that six convicts had escaped and five were still on the loose. In fact, we still have
no idea how this communication breakdown happened, because virtually the entire
page of the report that dealt with how Hickie was informed was blacked out.

Redaction of this report got to the ridiculous point of blacking out the names of
the gangs in the jail. Remember Hickie's claim last August that there were no
gangs in the jail? Peet's report reveals that 102 of the 452 (22.5 per cent)
prisoners are affiliated with gangs.

While the government responded seriously to Peet's report by allocating $87 million
for a new remand centre in Saskatoon and another $9.4 million to upgrade security
equipment and by emphasizing staff training and development, it's significant that
it chose not to blame anyone.

Not one individual was fired, disciplined or singled out. How can the guards
bear no responsibility for failing to notice that convicts had been digging away for
four months with a nail clipper?

As Peet put it, while he can accept one inmate might get away with deceiving one
corrections worker on any particular shift, it's unacceptable that "an entire
corridor of inmates can deceive at least 87 different corrections workers
between April 24 and Aug. 24, 2008, and engineer an escape of this
magnitude."

Some blame should also be placed on the former NDP government that oversaw the
physical deterioration of the facility and even may have exacerbated poor relations
between workers and management at the facility.

One can only shake one's head at the former government's policy, as noted in the
report, of allowing union representatives to consult directly with its Corrections
minister (that would be former jail guard Kevin Yates) "over issues that could not
be resolved at the local level."

Notwithstanding the contributions of our politicians to the jail-break debacle and
the events that followed, the vast majority of the blame falls on those employed at
the facility -- both managers and guards. Unless someone gets really serious about
fixing what's clearly an unprofessional and dysfunctional relationship, no amount of
new cameras, better cell doors or even a new prison will solve anything.

The temptation upon reading the report is to blame the guards alone. It does seem
as if the union got off lightly in Thursday's report. Peet drilled into the corporate
culture at the Regina jail, where shop stewards were "protective of employee
benefits" and, "for the most part, resistant to any suggestions that
management may put forth."

His report referred to "a number of correction workers who don't want to interact
with inmates" and worse, of workers who deliberately excluded information that
was critical to his investigation -- i.e.: that a security breach had been covered
with a wet paper towel and the guard failed to notice -- because they didn't
"want to rat out on a brother or sister." (=Camera's continually covered with
wet paper towels...for four months)

That tires were slashed in the parking lot and a plastic rat was hung on in the
window of the guards' control centre suggests an atmosphere of intimidation.

Yet, Peet said Thursday he was more inclined to blame management, which
certainly has to bear full responsibility for not responding to the tip from police in
July about the jail break and was most responsible for not ensuring the public was
immediately informed.

While it's tough to buy into Saskatchewan Government and General Employees
Union president Bob Bymoen's take that the problem is the "absence of clear
direction and leadership," Peet's report notes that managers at the jail would turn
a "blind eye" to the newspapers and Internet use that was distracting guards from
their duties.

What is clear is that neither the politicians nor the money they spend will
guarantee a fix to problems in corrections. The solution lies with both union and
management being more professional.
________________________
Unionized Government Employee's, and their Management which
are still in the same union but considered as "out of scope" members.
You just gotta love them. Nobody looses their job, or even gets a
reprimand. Unreal...

"That tires were slashed in the parking lot and a plastic rat was hung on in the
window of the guards' control centre suggests an atmosphere of intimidation."

This isn't being done by the inmates, but by unionized employees
against other unionized employees. Sounds like many of the Guards
and Management are on the wrong side of the bars....
___________________
 
petros
#22
Where Murray mentions "correction workers" is he talking the those who work for private firms or are actual "corrections officers" who work for the province?

Something tells me the govt doesn't want to let the people know if it was "corrections officers" or "farmed out cheaper private security" that blew it big time on their watch.
 
Ron in Regina
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Where Murray mentions "correction workers" is he talking the those who work for private firms or are actual "corrections officers" who work for the province?

Something tells me the govt doesn't want to let the people know if it was "corrections officers" or "farmed out cheaper private security" that blew it big time on their watch.


Good Eye. I missed that.
 
petros
#24
Trojan Security has a hefty contract with PCC Regina and do the majority of "guard work". Funny how the anti-union govt makes no mention of that.
 
JLM
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by CBC News View Post

Saskatchewan's minister of public safety has ordered an investigation into why 15 hours passed before authorities alerted the public about a prison break by six inmates.
One of six escapees was caught a short time after fleeing the Regina Correctional Centre on Sunday night at about 10 p.m., but five were still on the loose Tuesday.
A Canada-wide warrant was issued for the five escaped inmates, described as "dangerous and possibly armed" at a Monday afternoon news conference where the public was first alerted about the incident.
With the Trans-Canada Highway nearby, police acknowledge that the inmates could have travelled far in the hours since their escape.
Read full story
If you live near a prison or correctional facility how safe do you feel?


More...

That might be just about the safest place you could live as I doubt if criminals would be hanging around, as the ones who aren't inside are likely to be far away. I believe visiting hours at prisons are during day light hours, so even when their buds come to visit you can keep an eye on them. You probably stand a better chance of being mugged in front of the parliament bldgs.
 
petros
#26
Quote:

You probably stand a better chance of being mugged in front of the parliament bldgs.

And it's guaranteed you'll be mugged from INSIDE the parliament bldgs.