Canadian oil sector to be looking toward renewable energy


mentalfloss
#1
Developing a 'nearly worthless product'.. It's a no-brainer, said a helmet-head once..




Western Canada Select (WSC) crude oil has been selling for less than $5.00 a barrel, and on Friday, WCS was listed at $2.87, according to CBC Canada.

There are a number of things that can be started right now, like energy-efficient retrofits of homes and businesses – better windows or thicker insulation, says Boucher.

This type of work is labor-intensive and would be done by local contractors and businesses. Profits would stay in the community and homeowners would benefit from lower fuel bills. "These are simple approaches, but they're domestic. They don't put us in a situation where we're overly exposed to the ebbs and flows of oil and gas," Boucher said.

There is also solar, wind, geothermal and biomass energy from wood and crop waste that could all deliver government tax revenue and jobs. This is especially true of geothermal energy (GE). And guess where this energy is most abundant?

"The same place as the oil and gas that has paid the rent for over a century: right under our feet," writes David Yager in EnergyNow.ca.

Oil producers who've run out of space to store their nearly worthless product "will be paying people to take away our resources," Alberta Premier Jason Kenney said this month.

http://www.digitaljournal.com/busine...article/570517
 
Avro52
+1
#2
The keys you’re typing on are made from oil.
 
petros
+1
#3
He stopped using oil now that it's the cheapest it's been this century.
 
petros
+2
#4
Quote:

There are a number of things that can be started right now, like energy-efficient retrofits of homes and businesses – better windows or thicker insulation, says Boucher

The author must be too young to remember the reno boom of the 00's and the Harper era EcoEnergy program Trudeau killed when he got in office.

I cashed in on that big time. Windows, doors, basement insulation, geo thermal and hot water recovery.
 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
+2
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

He stopped using oil now that it's the cheapest it's been this century.


What the flosstard doesn't realize is that the prices he quotes are offers and not an actual sale.


No one in NorAm will sell for $5 a bbl, kinda like how some US grades had offers for the producer to pay a supplier $40 per bbl - no one will do this.


That said, buddy and his usual suspect buddies are good for a big laugh
 
Jinentonix
No Party Affiliation
+3
#6
Quote:

This is especially true of geothermal energy (GE). And guess where this energy is most abundant?

"The same place as the oil and gas that has paid the rent for over a century: right under our feet," writes David Yager in EnergyNow.ca.

Soooo basically a bunch of whiny fags who cried about fracking are suddenly into fracking?


Maybe a little history for the morons will help. The first known cause of earthquakes/tremors caused by fracking happened at a Swiss geo-thermal proof of concept facility. And even then geo-thermal wells can run dry. A $10 billion geothermal plant in Iceland was shut down some time ago after only 10 years of operation because the geothermal well they had tapped into, dried up.


Now, let's take a REAL close look at what so-called "Green Energy" will cost. A new problem is beginning to emerge that warrants our attention. Some proponents of the Green New Deal seem to believe that it will pave the way to a utopia of “green growth.” Once we trade dirty fossil fuels for clean energy, there’s no reason we can’t keep expanding the economy forever. This narrative may seem reasonable enough at first glance, but there are good reasons to think twice about it. One of them has to do with clean energy itself.
The phrase “clean energy” normally conjures up happy, innocent images of warm sunshine and fresh wind. But while sunshine and wind is obviously clean, the infrastructure we need to capture it is not. Far from it. The transition to renewables is going to require a dramatic increase in the extraction of metals and rare-earth minerals, with real ecological and social costs.
We need a rapid transition to renewables, yes—but scientists warn that we can’t keep growing energy use at existing rates. No energy is innocent. The only truly clean energy is less energy.
In 2017, the World Bank released a little-noticed report that offered the first comprehensive look at this question. It models the increase in material extraction that would be required to build enough solar and wind utilities to produce an annual output of about 7 terawatts of electricity by 2050. That’s enough to power roughly half of the global economy. By doubling the World Bank figures, we can estimate what it will take to get all the way to zero emissions—and the results are staggering: 34 million metric tons of copper, 40 million tons of lead, 50 million tons of zinc, 162 million tons of aluminum, and no less than 4.8 billion tons of iron.



In some cases, the transition to renewables will require a massive increase over existing levels of extraction. For neodymium—an essential element in wind turbines—extraction will need to rise by nearly 35 percent over current levels. Higher-end estimates reported by the World Bank suggest it could double.



The same is true of silver, which is critical to solar panels. Silver extraction will go up 38 percent and perhaps as much as 105 percent. Demand for indium, also essential to solar technology, will more than triple and could end up skyrocketing by 920 percent.
And then there are all the batteries we’re going to need for power storage. To keep energy flowing when the sun isn’t shining and the wind isn’t blowing will require enormous batteries at the grid level. This means 40 million tons of lithium—an eye-watering 2,700 percent increase over current levels of extraction.



That’s just for electricity. We also need to think about vehicles. This year, a group of leading British scientists submitted a letter to the U.K. Committee on Climate Change outlining their concerns about the ecological impact of electric cars. They agree, of course, that we need to end the sale and use of combustion engines. But they pointed out that unless consumption habits change, replacing the world’s projected fleet of 2 billion vehicles is going to require an explosive increase in mining: Global annual extraction of neodymium and dysprosium will go up by another 70 percent, annual extraction of copper will need to more than double, and cobalt will need to increase by a factor of almost four—all for the entire period from now to 2050.



The problem here is not that we’re going to run out of key minerals—although that may indeed become a concern. The real issue is that this will exacerbate an already existing crisis of overextraction. Mining has become one of the biggest single drivers of deforestation, ecosystem collapse, and biodiversity loss around the world. Ecologists estimate that even at present rates of global material use, we are overshooting sustainable levels by 82 percent.



Take silver, for instance. Mexico is home to the Peñasquito mine, one of the biggest silver mines in the world. Covering nearly 40 square miles, the operation is staggering in its scale: a sprawling open-pit complex ripped into the mountains, flanked by two waste dumps each a mile long, and a tailings dam full of toxic sludge held back by a wall that’s 7 miles around and as high as a 50-story skyscraper. This mine will produce 11,000 tons of silver in 10 years before its reserves, the biggest in the world, are gone.
To transition the global economy to renewables, we need to commission up to 130 more mines on the scale of Peñasquito. Just for silver.

Lithium is another ecological disaster. It takes 500,000 gallons of water to produce a single ton of lithium. Even at present levels of extraction this is causing problems. In the Andes, where most of the world’s lithium is located, mining companies are burning through the water tables and leaving farmers with nothing to irrigate their crops. Many have had no choice but to abandon their land altogether. Meanwhile, chemical leaks from lithium mines have poisoned rivers from Chile to Argentina, Nevada to Tibet, killing off whole freshwater ecosystems. The lithium boom has barely even started, and it’s already a crisis.


More: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/t...=pocket-newtab


As it is, derelict wind turbines are being left in place to just rot and fall apart because it's not "cost effective" for the companies to remove them despite their contractual obligations to do so.


Sorry to inject some reality into your stupid little fantasy. As for oil prices dropping, I guess you didn't hear there's a pandemic going around and people are supposed to stay home. As for WCS, the ONLY reason it's price is so god awful is because pinheads like you keep whining like bitches about exporting it. Mexico has a very similar heavy crude as WCS and it was selling for over twice that of WSC. Do you know why? BECAUSE THEY CAN RELIABLY GET THEIR F*CKING PRODUCT TO MARKET. We can't even build a pipeline without stupid little fags like you crying like little girls about it.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Developing a 'nearly worthless product'.. It's a no-brainer, said a helmet-head once..
Western Canada Select (WSC) crude oil has been selling for less than $5.00 a barrel, and on Friday, WCS was listed at $2.87, according to CBC Canada.
There are a number of things that can be started right now, like energy-efficient retrofits of homes and businesses – better windows or thicker insulation, says Boucher.
This type of work is labor-intensive and would be done by local contractors and businesses. Profits would stay in the community and homeowners would benefit from lower fuel bills. "These are simple approaches, but they're domestic. They don't put us in a situation where we're overly exposed to the ebbs and flows of oil and gas," Boucher said.
There is also solar, wind, geothermal and biomass energy from wood and crop waste that could all deliver government tax revenue and jobs. This is especially true of geothermal energy (GE). And guess where this energy is most abundant?
"The same place as the oil and gas that has paid the rent for over a century: right under our feet," writes David Yager in EnergyNow.ca.
Oil producers who've run out of space to store their nearly worthless product "will be paying people to take away our resources," Alberta Premier Jason Kenney said this month.

Nice little fluff piece you have here, but did you realise this is going on right now and guess who is delivering on the biggest projects of renewable energy? You got it Energy companies offsetting their Carbon footprint.
 
mentalfloss
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Avro52 View Post

The keys you’re typing on are made from oil.

When it was worth something.

Now it's worth less than petros' cum.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
#9
good .
 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
+2
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

When it was worth something.

Now it's worth less than petros' cum.


Do you gargle those keyboard keys as well?
 
Jinentonix
No Party Affiliation
+3
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

When it was worth something.

Now it's worth less than petros' cum.

But it's still worth more than you.
 
mentalfloss
#12
No, I still have a job.
 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
+1
#13
Boystown didn't shut due to coronavirus?
 
mentalfloss
#14
We're essential.

Unlike Alberta. *snicker*
 
Hoid
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Developing a 'nearly worthless product'.. It's a no-brainer, said a helmet-head once..




Western Canada Select (WSC) crude oil has been selling for less than $5.00 a barrel, and on Friday, WCS was listed at $2.87, according to CBC Canada.

There are a number of things that can be started right now, like energy-efficient retrofits of homes and businesses – better windows or thicker insulation, says Boucher.

This type of work is labor-intensive and would be done by local contractors and businesses. Profits would stay in the community and homeowners would benefit from lower fuel bills. "These are simple approaches, but they're domestic. They don't put us in a situation where we're overly exposed to the ebbs and flows of oil and gas," Boucher said.

There is also solar, wind, geothermal and biomass energy from wood and crop waste that could all deliver government tax revenue and jobs. This is especially true of geothermal energy (GE). And guess where this energy is most abundant?

"The same place as the oil and gas that has paid the rent for over a century: right under our feet," writes David Yager in EnergyNow.ca.

Oil producers who've run out of space to store their nearly worthless product "will be paying people to take away our resources," Alberta Premier Jason Kenney said this month.

http://www.digitaljournal.com/busine...article/570517

This has all come true or is coming true.

The way the stock market works is that it factors in the future.

It has factored in the future of oil-based fuel and this is what it is.
 
petros
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

What the flosstard doesn't realize is that the prices he quotes are offers and not an actual sale.
No one in NorAm will sell for $5 a bbl, kinda like how some US grades had offers for the producer to pay a supplier $40 per bbl - no one will do this.
That said, buddy and his usual suspect buddies are good for a big laugh

Not too sharp that boy.
 
Avro52
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

No, I still have a job.

Fluffer?

You do seem to know what the value of cum is.
 
petros
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

This has all come true or is coming true.
The way the stock market works is that it factors in the future.
It has factored in the future of oil-based fuel and this is what it is.

Its a dream. After April 30th you'll wake up to June futures.
 
petros
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Avro52 View Post

Fluffer?
You do seem to know what the value of cum is.

At night he drives for Skip the Dishes.
 
Avro52
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

At night he drives for Skip the Dishes.

Whats he delivering....?

 
captain morgan
No Party Affiliation
+1
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

We're essential.
Unlike Alberta. *snicker*

Wow
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

This has all come true or is coming true.
The way the stock market works is that it factors in the future.
It has factored in the future of oil-based fuel and this is what it is.

Your partly right.

I feel badly for the renewables and EV market... Gonna be tough sledding for those guys
 
petros
+2
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Avro52 View Post

Whats he delivering....?

Pizza, hes saving up for an IROC.
 
Avro52
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Pizza, hes saving up for an IROC.

An old V8, whats the MPG on that?

1
 
petros
+1
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Wow
Your partly right.
I feel badly for the renewables and EV market... Gonna be tough sledding for those guys

Renewable is a Natty Daddy catch term like tidewater.
 
petros
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Avro52 View Post

An old V8, whats the MPG on that?
1

Do you know what IROC is an acronym for?
 
Avro52
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Do you know what IROC is an acronym for?

No, actually.
 
petros
#27
Italian Retard Out Cruising
 
Avro52
+1
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Italian Retard Out Cruising

Yikes....good thing I bought a trans am in my twenties.
 
mentalfloss
#29
Take that IROC and seduce your white trash with it.


This Historic Oil Price Crash Will Create A New Era For Energy

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-G...nergy.amp.html
 
Dixie Cup
Conservative
+2
#30
Oil will be a requirement for many, many years to come. What goes down will eventually come back up. Too many people rely on it for consumer products in addition to transportation and a reliable source of heat & electricity. Those demanding that we go strictly solar & wind are being disingenuous. There may be a place for renewables but they will never replace oil at any time in the near future. Simply too unreliable.
 

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