Treasure hunter finds ring that may have been worn by two of Henry VIII's wives


Blackleaf
#1
When metal detectorist Paul Ibbotson found a bejewelled gold ring in a farmer’s field he knew it was special.

But when he researched it he became convinced it may have belonged to two of Henry VIII’s wives and was last worn by Catherine Howard months before she was beheaded.

His fanciful story will intrigue visitors to a museum in York when the 15th-century ring – valued at £20,000 – goes on display later this year.

Was this ring worn by Henry VIII's fifth wife before she was beheaded? Treasure hunter finds ring 'worn by TWO of the 16th-century monarch's six wives' in a field in York


Paul Ibbotson found a bejeweled golf ring in a field and knew it was special

The researched it and found out it was last worn by Catherine Howard

Its provenance cannot be proved and it will be house in a musuem in York

By Chris Brooke for the Daily Mail
15 June 2019

When metal detectorist Paul Ibbotson found a bejewelled gold ring in a farmer’s field he knew it was special.

But when he researched it he became convinced it may have belonged to two of Henry VIII’s wives and was last worn by Catherine Howard months before she was beheaded.

His fanciful story will intrigue visitors to a museum in York when the 15th-century ring – valued at £20,000 – goes on display later this year.


The ring (left) was valued at £20,000 and after some research Paul Ibboston (right) believes it could have belonged to Anne of Cleves

But experts, while describing the gold ring set with ruby and emerald as an ‘incredible treasure’, say its provenance cannot be proved.

Mr Ibbotson, 52, from Blackpool, found it in a field at Fulford, near York, in December 2016. It was officially declared treasure and he and the landowner received £10,000 each. Now, after more than two years of research, Mr Ibbotson believes it could be the ring on the index finger of Anne of Cleves in Hans Holbein’s 1539 portrait.


Could Anne of Cleves have worn the same ring? The portrait above shows her wearing beautiful jewels


The ring (pictured above) will be displayed at a Museum in York later this year with experts saying it's an 'impossible story'

The painting convinced King Henry VIII to marry her but he was disappointed when he met her in real life and their marriage the following year was never consummated, and annulled.

Meanwhile, Catherine Howard, a lady-in-waiting, had caught Henry’s eye at court and became his fifth wife in July 1540. Mr Ibbotson believes Anne gave her the ring and she wore it when the royal couple arrived in York in 1541.

He suggests Catherine and her lover the courtier Thomas Culpeper may have met in the area and that she threw it to the ground to show her love for him over the king. The lovers were both eventually executed.

Lucy Creighton, of the Yorkshire Museum, said the story ‘is impossible to verify [but] this doesn’t make the ring any less special’.


Henry VIII's wives and how their fates panned out while being married to one of the most famous kings of all time

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art....html#comments
 
Danbones
#2
So how come the sjws haven't wiped him from the pages of history yet?
 
Curious Cdn
#3
Anne of Cleves wasn't beheaded. She skidaddled back to Deutchland as fast as her fat little legs could carry her, once she found out that Henry was a syphilitic Jabba the Hut.
 
Blackleaf
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Anne of Cleves wasn't beheaded. She skidaddled back to Deutchland as fast as her fat little legs could carry her, once she found out that Henry was a syphilitic Jabba the Hut.

And she wasn't as attractive as he first thought, too.
 
Curious Cdn
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

And she wasn't as attractive as he first thought, too.

Not that he could have done anything about it anyway, by that point.
 
Blackleaf
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Not that he could have done anything about it anyway, by that point.

He could - he was the King - and he did: He just got rid of her.
 
Curious Cdn
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

He could - he was the King - and he did: He just got rid of her.

I think that it was mutually agreed upon.
 
Blackleaf
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

I think that it was mutually agreed upon.

Henry was the power behind it.
 
Curious Cdn
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Henry was the power behind it.

Woman were chattels, back then. Anne of Cleves was obviously a smart one.
 
Blackleaf
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Woman were chattels, back then. Anne of Cleves was obviously a smart one.

Henry didn't think so. He preferred educated women, and she wasn't. She was good at needlework, though.

Anne of Cleves was "of middling beauty and of very assured and resolute countenance" - French ambassador Charles de Marillac

"Her hair hanging down, which was fair, yellow and long ... she was apparelled after the English fashion, with a French hood, which so set forth her beauty and good visage, that every creature rejoiced to behold her" - chronicler Edward Hall

Henry met her privately on New Year's Day 1540 at Rochester Abbey in Rochester on her journey from Dover. Henry and some of his courtiers, following a courtly-love tradition, went disguised into the room where Anne was staying. Eustace Chapuys reported:

[The King] so went up into the chamber where the said Lady Anne was looking out of a window to see the bull-baiting which was going on in the courtyard, and suddenly he embraced and kissed her, and showed her a token which the king had sent her for New Year’s gift, and she being abashed and not knowing who it was thanked him, and so he spoke with her. But she regarded him little, but always looked out the window…. and when the king saw that she took so little notice of his coming he went into another chamber and took off his cloak and came in again in a coat of purple velvet. And when the lords and knights saw his grace they did him reverence.

According to the testimony of his companions, he was disappointed with Anne, feeling she was not as described. According to the chronicler Charles Wriothesley, Anne "regarded him little", though it is unknown if she knew if this was the king or not. Henry did then reveal his true identity to Anne, although he is said to have been put off the marriage from then on. Henry and Anne then met officially on 3 January on Blackheath outside the gates of Greenwich Park, where a grand reception was laid out.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_o...g_preparations
Last edited by Blackleaf; Jul 7th, 2019 at 12:30 PM..
 
Curious Cdn
#11
She go out alive with a purse full of money.

Anne of Cleves was a smart one.
 
MHz
#12
Put down the 3D printer and walk away,
 
Danbones
#13
He'll have to let go the banana he printed first.