Trans Mountain protesters warned they may already be under surveillance


petros
+4
#1
Ha-Ha!

CALGARY—Trans Mountain opponents are prepping for what is expected to be a summer of protest against the pipeline expansion project, but experts fear police and private security teams already have them under surveillance.

Corporate security teams for major energy companies have long worked hand-in-hand with the RCMP and CSIS to deter protesters who are seen as potential eco-terrorists, according to a paper published by two academics in 2016. Its authors suggest the same situation is likely with the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.

Experts say the importance of the Trans Mountain pipeline to the federal government means surveillance of protests is almost certainly happening.

Drawing from internal RCMP memos obtained through Access To Information and Privacy requests, they found both sides collect a broad range of mundane information, including the attendance of peaceful protests and anti-infrastructure comments made on blogs.

For a protester caught up in this surveillance, the consequences can be quite real.

Kevin Walby, an associate professor in the department of criminal justice at the University of Winnipeg and one of the paper’s co-authors, gave a hypothetical. Photos of a particular protester might be taken by corporate security agents, shared with police officers, and then used to pull them out of a crowd at a protest even if they haven’t committed an offense.

It raises the profile of any given activist, making it more likely that police will target them,” Walby said.

Once a person’s information is in the hands of the RCMP or CSIS, Canadian national security law also allows it to be shared between a wide range of government departments under certain circumstances. Bill C-59, which recently received royal assent, grants permission to do so if the person in question is involved in “significant or widespread interference” with critical infrastructure.

Brenda McPhail, director of the Canadian Civil Liberties’ Association’s privacy, technology and surveillance project, said significant or widespread interference with “critical infrastructure,” such as a pipeline, could qualify. She explained that C-59 contains a rider exempting constitutionally-protected acts of advocacy, protest, dissent, or artistic expression — unless they’re conducted in conjunction with an activity that does.

“Increasingly, security forces view protests as potential sites of violence rather than constitutionally protected spaces to express dissatisfaction or political opinion,” she said.

The word “significant” also isn’t well-defined in the legislation, McPhail said, making it unclear where and when it would take effect.

“Would a non-violent but long-term occupation of a potential mine site be significant?” she asked. “Or the same thing with an occupation of the pipeline site, like a blockade. How long would it have to happen for it to be significant?”

First Nations and environmental groups vowed to continue protesting the 1,150-kilometre pipeline expansion between Edmonton and Burnaby, B.C. immediately after the federal government approved it earlier this month.

In a statement, the RCMP said its liaison officers in Alberta and B.C. are maintaining relationships with Indigenous communities and encourages “open and direct dialogue” between First Nations, industry and government. Trans Mountain Corporation said in its own statement it had “enhanced security” at its facilities.

Walby said the importance of the Trans Mountain pipeline to the federal government means surveillance of protests is almost certainly happening.

“I would be surprised if it wasn’t because this is a critical infrastructure initiative and the government stake in it is huge,” he said.

Through their ATIP requests, Walby and Jeffrey Monaghan, an assistant professor at Carleton University’s institute for criminology and criminal justice, found CSIS and the RCMP take part in semi-annual meetings with energy industry representatives called Utility and Energy Sector Stakeholder briefings. The energy representatives all possessed security clearances allowing them to view classified intelligence.

Trans Mountain Corporation said it did not attend the most recent meeting.

The stakeholder briefings “provide a forum for the private sector to brief the Canadian intelligence and law-enforcement community on issues we would not normally be privy to,” according to the internal RCMP documents obtained by Monaghan and Walby.

In one example of this co-operation, Enbridge surveilled a peaceful protest of no more than 50 people outside Hardisty Terminal during the approval process for the Northern Gateway pipeline.

That information later showed up in a situational awareness report provided to Alberta’s Counter-Terrorism Crisis Management Plan.

Surveillance of activists can also include the use of algorithms or scrapers designed to monitor social media accounts remotely, McPhail explained. Monaghan and Walby’s research suggests the RCMP also conduct their own on-the-ground surveillance, particularly of Indigenous groups.

In one exchange, RCMP officers warned of the “possibility of activities” related to Northern Gateway environmental protests at an all-Indigenous basketball tournament in Prince Rupert, B.C.

Indigenous groups who are peacefully opposed to energy projects have found themselves on the receiving end of conventional, yet aggressive policing tactics. In January, RCMP officers enforcing an injunction against a northern B.C. blockade set up by Wet’suwet’en Nation protesters arrived heavily armed and forcefully arrested 14 people.

Walby said much of the policing around TMX protests will be similar. “There’ll be some armoured personnel carriers, there’ll be riot gear, but it’s the work behind the scenes that’s really scary.”

Monaghan suspects that pre-emptive surveillance may be a way for police forces to out-manoeuvre protesters’ tactics, especially in the face of public scrutiny.

“They’ll never admit that, but I think that part of this information preparedness that they go about trying to get ready for is really about communications, and it’s about controlling tomorrow’s media narratives,” he said.

Brennan Doherty is a work and wealth reporter with Star Calgary. Follow him on Twitter: @bren_doherty
 
Twin_Moose
+5
#2  Top Rated Post
Hopefully they go in and remove the paid for professional protestors, remove the paid for agitator take the wind out of the protest.
 
Curious Cdn
+1 / -1
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Hopefully they go in and remove the paid for professional protestors, remove the paid for agitator take the wind out of the protest.

You mean the Exxon guys who don't want Canadian oil to go anywhere else in the World but straight south?

Those professional agitators?
 
petros
+4
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Hopefully they go in and remove the paid for professional protestors, remove the paid for agitator take the wind out of the protest.

Hit them where it hurts. Jam their WiFi.
 
petros
+4
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

You mean the Exxon guys who don't want Canadian oil to go anywhere else in the World but straight south?
Those professional agitators?

That would be the financiers. Audits can freeze the money flow in a heartbeat.
 
captain morgan
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

You mean the Exxon guys who don't want Canadian oil to go anywhere else in the World but straight south?

Those professional agitators?


The Exxon guys will be sending their agents out to buy up as much land and oil production they can in Western Canada in order to use that pipeline to ship to the Far East
 
Curious Cdn
-1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

The Exxon guys will be sending their agents out to buy up as much land and oil production they can in Western Canada in order to use that pipeline to ship to the Far East

"Far East" being Eastern Texas and Louisiana ...
 
MHz
#8
Nova Plants need the line to shop pellets that are about the weight of popcorn. Only one place they would be going, China and the new plants the IMF is opening up that will be robots that will replace the 80,000 laborers in NATO aligned countries that will be the last worker those countries produce.
Last edited by MHz; Jul 4th, 2019 at 08:25 PM..
 
petros
+3
#9
WTF? Is the rain setting off the mold again?
 
taxslave
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

"Far East" being Eastern Texas and Louisiana ...

Far east is Newbrunskick and Nova Scotia. Near east is anywhere east of Hope.
 
petros
+2
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Far east is Newbrunskick and Nova Scotia. Near east is anywhere east of Hope.

Winnepeg is the Middle East
 
petros
+2
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Far east is Newbrunskick and Nova Scotia. Near east is anywhere east of Hope.

It's all "back East".
 
Jinentonix
+2
#13
Quote:

Drawing from internal RCMP memos obtained through Access To Information and Privacy requests, they found both sides collect a broad range of mundane information, including the attendance of peaceful protests and anti-infrastructure comments made on blogs.

Someone should send a sample of Hoidybowl's work to them.
 
Curious Cdn
-1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Far east is Newbrunskick and Nova Scotia. Near east is anywhere east of Hope.

It's not coming this way. I costs too much to use petroleum from Western Canada. It's a lot cheaper to bring it in from just about anywhere by tanker than to pump it over the high point in the country.
 
Curious Cdn
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

It's all "back East".

.... in the "mysterious East" over that way,somewhere or other.
 
taxslave
+2
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

It's not coming this way. I costs too much to use petroleum from Western Canada. It's a lot cheaper to bring it in from just about anywhere by tanker than to pump it over the high point in the country.

Funny theycan pump it all the way to Vancouver. Lots higher than the little hills out your way.
 
Twin_Moose
+2
#17
Especially since it is pumped to Montreal already, just needs a little more capacity
 
Curious Cdn
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Funny theycan pump it all the way to Vancouver. Lots higher than the little hills out your way.

Maybe, Vancouver is a lot closer and maybe, it's a lot harder to ship cheap oil from the Middle East and the Gulf of Mexico to Vancouver than to New Brunswick. It's a nice sea level, straight-line ship voyage from both places to Atlantic Canada and the transportation costs are negligeable.
 
Curious Cdn
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Especially since it is pumped to Montreal already, just needs a little more capacity

Not from the West, it's not ...
 
taxslave
+2
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Maybe, Vancouver is a lot closer and maybe, it's a lot harder to ship cheap oil from the Middle East and the Gulf of Mexico to Vancouver than to New Brunswick. It's a nice sea level, straight-line ship voyage from both places to Atlantic Canada and the transportation costs are negligeable.

Only because trudOWE hasn't imposed a tanker ban on the east coast like he did to us. If those tankers had to pay a carbon tax like Canadian oil has to it would be significantly more expensive. Good thing foreign oil doesn't polute.
Oh wait that ban only applies to outgoing oil not imports.
 
petros
+1
#21
Tankers have made their way from NL to Vancouver thru Panama. Aug of 2015 prices in Metro Vancouver dropped 10 cents upon arrival of a tanker from NL.
 
Curious Cdn
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Only because trudOWE hasn't imposed a tanker ban on the east coast like he did to us. If those tankers had to pay a carbon tax like Canadian oil has to it would be significantly more expensive. Good thing foreign oil doesn't polute.
Oh wait that ban only applies to outgoing oil not imports.

The reality of World geography is that whatever trudOwe did or didn't do is irrelevant. The situation is many decades old, going back to WWII and not to some imagined Liberal cabal against Western Canada. It is a lot cheaper to float the easily extracted oil that is all around the North Atlantic basin up the St. Lawrence (you don't pump anything going east "up-and-over" from Montreal) than to pump it over the continent in pipelines. There is no cheaper way to move any commodity than by ship. This will not change. Maybe, it is our national duty to take the more expensive Alberta product in the East but it makes more economic sense to pump it West, instead to the thirsty and still developing Pacific Rim where you can get more $$$ for it.

Look at a globe, sometime.
 
taxslave
+3
#23
So why not buy Newfoundland oil?
The real problem is Ontariowe and Quebec don't have any oil of their own and their last goround at stealing Western oil didn't work out so well.
 
Twin_Moose
+2
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Not from the West, it's not ...

Are you sure?



Oil from Enbridge's Line 9B begins pumping into Montreal

Quote:

Up to 300,000 barrels of oil a day are expected to flow between Alberta and Quebec...……..More

 
Walter
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

It's not coming this way. I costs too much to use petroleum from Western Canada. It's a lot cheaper to bring it in from just about anywhere by tanker than to pump it over the high point in the country.

What high point, it’s all downhill from AB to NS.
 
pgs
+1
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Only because trudOWE hasn't imposed a tanker ban on the east coast like he did to us. If those tankers had to pay a carbon tax like Canadian oil has to it would be significantly more expensive. Good thing foreign oil doesn't polute.
Oh wait that ban only applies to outgoing oil not imports.

No connection between Irving Oil and Liberals . No collisions between whales and tankers in the Gulf of St. Lawrence either .
 
Curious Cdn
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Are you sure?

Oil from Enbridge's Line 9B begins pumping into Montreal

Maybe, that's why the price of our gasolene is going up.
 
Twin_Moose
#28
Just a side note CC Suncor refinery drove the decision to reverse Line 9 to use their Ft Mac oil, This reversal happened back in 2015 and I have mentioned it a lot on this forum, especially when we were discussing Energy East where TCPL has a line they want to convert that is running gas to Montreal. They wanted to end it at either the St. Lawrence to load out from, or take it to Halifax for Irving and a loading terminal.
 
Curious Cdn
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

No connection between Irving Oil and Liberals . No collisions between whales and tankers in the Gulf of St. Lawrence either .

Most of the Whale deaths are in and around the Bay of Fundy where tankers dare not go.
 
Twin_Moose
#30
Also if you missed it Line 9 was first installed by the insistence of Trudeau Sr. to supply PetroCan with western crude during his NEP push, later reversed to send foreign oil down to Sarnia, reversed again to send Western crude to Montreal. Now you should be caught up LOl